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" There happened in my time one noble speaker who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, where he could spare or pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less... "
Essays, Critical and Miscellaneous - Página 249
por Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1856 - 744 páginas
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A Memoir of S. S. Prentiss, Volumen1

George Lewis Prentiss - 1861 - 398 páginas
...none, and inimitable by any." Or, as rare Ben Jonson wrote of Lord Bacon himself : " No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered...uttered ; no member of his speech but consisted of its own graces.- His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him without loss." The main topic...
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Critical, Historical and Miscellaneous Essays, Volumen3

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1862 - 514 páginas
...Jonson, a most unexceptionable judge, has described Bacon's eloquence in words, which, though oflen quoted, will bear to be quoted again. " There happened...his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his...
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The Christian Examiner, Volumen72

1862 - 488 páginas
...writes Ben Jonson, " one noble speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered...his own graces. His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry and pleased at...
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Bacon, His Writings and His Philosophy

George Lillie Craik - 1862 - 728 páginas
...or pass by a jest, was nobly censorious [censorlike]. No man ever spake more neatly, more prcssly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness,...his own graces. His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at...
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The Biographical History of Philosophy: From Its Origin in Greece ..., Volumen2

George Henry Lewes - 1863 - 478 páginas
...admirable judge to assure us that Bacon's oratory was worthy of his other powers. Ben Jonson thus writes: "There happened, in my time, .one noble speaker, who...his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded when he spoke, and had his judges angry or pleased at his...
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A Compendium of English Literautre: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1863 - 788 páginas
...speaking. His language (where he could spare or pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered...his own graces. His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry and pleased at...
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Francisci Baconi de re litteraria judicia

Paul Jacquinet - 1863 - 160 páginas
...Pindarum, gravissimum (1) « No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more « weightily, orjsuffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he « uttered....own graces. « His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. <i He commanded where he spok ; and had his judges angry and « pleased...
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Philosophical works

Francis Bacon - 1864
...speaking. His language (where he could spare or pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered...his own graces. His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry and pleased at...
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1865 - 784 páginas
...speaking. His language (where he could spare or pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered...own graces. His. hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry and pleased at...
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The works of lord Macaulay, complete, ed. by lady Trevelyan, Volumen6

Thomas Babington baron Macaulay - 1866 - 730 páginas
...capacious rather than a subtle mind. Ben Jonson, a most unexceptionable judge, has described Bacon's eloquence in words, which, though often quoted, will...his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his...
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