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try. These gentlemen were glad to accept the invitation and came in a spirit,-as expressed by Mayor Schmitz,-of a desire to recognize the larger interests of the country and to aid in adjusting the entire situation.

Conferences
at
Washington.

some years ago, and it has still further imperial aims and objects that look into the future. It intends in the most definite way to direct-the main currents of Japanese emigration toward territories under Japanese imperial control. What the San Franciscans really want, on the other hand, is a pracMayor Schmitz, with his assotical cessation of the tide of Japanese coolie ciates, spent a number of days immigration. Their school order was not inlast month at Washington and tended to create an international dispute. It had several conferences with the President was a mere casual expression of their atti- and Secretary Root. There developed raptude toward Asiatic immigration. If they idly the outline of a solution more complete could be assured that the coming of coolies than anybody had anticipated. The Caliwould cease, they could not possibly object fornians seemed disposed to modify their to according courteous treatment to a few school policy in view of the evident purpose Japanese children in their schools. From the of the Administration to do what it could to international standpoint, however, the situa- exclude the further entrance of Asiatic lation was such that our Government could borers. Furthermore, a mode of exclusion not well take up with Japan the labor ques- was discovered that could be brought into tion until it could give some assurance re- immediate effect. There was pending in specting the other matter. President Roose- conference committee between the two velt, therefore, showed his accustomed wis- houses of Congress an elaborate Immigration dom and good sense in inviting Mayor bill modifying in various ways the existing Schmitz and the school board of San Fran- laws regulating the general subject. The cisco to come to Washington and confer chief reason for a long-standing deadlock in with him regarding a series of matters which the conference committee lay in the fact that were of serious importance to the entire coun- the Senate had voted to exclude illiterates,

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ARE THE WESTERN NATIONS ALARMED AT JAPAN'S COMMERCIAL PROSPERITY? (Reproduced from a highly colored double-page cartoon in the illustrated weekly, Puck, of Tokio.)

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Copyright, 1906, by the National Press Association, Washington.

MAYOR SCHMITZ AND MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., WHO VISITED
WASHINGTON LAST MONTH FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONFERRING WITH THE PRESIDENT ON THE JAPA-
NESE SCHOOL QUESTION.

(From left to right.-Alfred Roncovieri, Supt. of Schools: David Oliver, Jr., Director of Schools:
John T. Williams, Asst. City Attorney; Thomas F. Boyle, Director of Schools; Elmer C. Leffingwell,
Secy. Board of Education; Mayor E. E. Schmitz; Lawrence E. Walsh, Pres. Board of Education;
Aaron Altman, Director of Schools.)

and the other house was unwilling to accept so sweeping a change in our immigration laws. It was suggested that by a simple modification of the pending Immigration bill the desired exclusion might be accomplished without a direct mention of any nationality. No Japanese laborers are allowed to leave Japan without passports. The Japanese Government is not issuing passports authorizing laborers to come to the United States, but such documents name the Hawaiian Islands, the Philippines, Mexico, and other countries as points of destination. The amendment of the pending Immigration bill as proposed would authorize the President to refuse admission to laborers holding such passports, if in his judgment their coming is detrimental to our industrial conditions. The solution is not an absolute one, but

Important Solutions.

It was understood that this policy

would be entirely agreeable to the Japanese Government. It was accordingly accepted by the conferences of the two houses. In order to secure a prompt solution of the Japanese question, Senator Lodge and his associates yielded to the House committee on the question of excluding illiterates. Thus it was confidently expected that three very important questions would be settled at one stroke, namely, the California school question, the Japanese labor question, and the dispute which was preventing the Immigration bill from becoming a law. It is to be much regretted that many American newspapers were so indiscreet as to declare boldly and with great headlines day after day that we were on the verge of war with Japan. It is true that the ques

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try. These gentlemen were glad to accept the invitation and came in a spirit,—as expressed by Mayor Schmitz,-of a desire to recognize the larger interests of the country and to aid in adjusting the entire situation.

Conferences
at
Washington.

some years ago, and it has still further imperial aims and objects that look into the future. It intends in the most definite way to direct the main currents of Japanese emigration toward territories under Japanese imperial control. What the San Franciscans really want, on the other hand, is a pracMayor Schmitz, with his assotical cessation of the tide of Japanese coolie ciates, spent a number of days immigration. Their school order was not inlast month at Washington and tended to create an international dispute. It had several conferences with the President was a mere casual expression of their atti- and Secretary Root. There developed raptude toward Asiatic immigration. If they idly the outline of a solution more complete could be assured that the coming of coolies than anybody had anticipated. The Caliwould cease, they could not possibly object fornians seemed disposed to modify their to according courteous treatment to a few school policy in view of the evident purpose Japanese children in their schools. From the of the Administration to do what it could to international standpoint, however, the situa- exclude the further entrance of Asiatic lation was such that our Government could borers. Furthermore, a mode of exclusion not well take up with Japan the labor ques- was discovered that could be brought into tion until it could give some assurance re- immediate effect. There was pending in specting the other matter. President Roose- conference committee between the two velt, therefore, showed his accustomed wis- houses of Congress an elaborate Immigration dom and good sense in inviting Mayor bill modifying in various ways the existing Schmitz and the school board of San Fran- laws regulating the general subject. The cisco to come to Washington and confer chief reason for a long-standing deadlock in with him regarding a series of matters which the conference committee lay in the fact that were of serious importance to the entire coun- the Senate had voted to exclude illiterates,

[graphic]

ARE THE WESTERN NATIONS ALARMED AT JAPAN'S COMMERCIAL PROSPERITY? (Reproduced from a highly colored double-page cartoon in the illustrated weekly, Puck, of Tokio.)

[graphic][merged small]

MAYOR SCHMITZ AND MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., WHO VISITED WASHINGTON LAST MONTH FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONFERRING WITH THE PRESIDENT ON THE JAPANESE SCHOOL QUESTION.

(From left to right.-Alfred Roncovieri, Supt. of Schools: David Oliver, Jr., Director of Schools: John T. Williams, Asst. City Attorney; Thomas F. Boyle, Director of Schools; Elmer C. Leffingwell, Secy. Board of Education; Mayor E. E. Schmitz; Lawrence E. Walsh, Pres. Board of Education; Aaron Altman, Director of Schools.)

and the other house was unwilling to accept so sweeping a change in our immigration laws. It was suggested that by a simple modification of the pending Immigration bill the desired exclusion might be accomplished without a direct mention of any nationality. No Japanese laborers are allowed to leave Japan without passports. The Japanese Government is not issuing passports authorizing laborers to come to the United States, but such documents name the Hawaiian Islands, the Philippines, Mexico, and other countries as points of destination. The amendment of the pending Immigration bill as proposed would authorize the President to refuse admission to laborers holding such passports, if in his judgment their coming is detrimental to our industrial conditions. The solution is not an absolute one, but

Important Solutions.

It was understood that this policy

would be entirely agreeable to the Japanese Government. It was accordingly accepted by the conferences of the two houses. In order to secure a prompt solution of the Japanese question, Senator Lodge and his associates yielded to the House committee on the question of excluding illiterates. Thus it was confidently expected that three very important questions would be settled at one stroke, namely, the California school question, the Japanese labor question, and the dispute which was preventing the Immigration bill from becoming a law. It is to be much regretted that many American newspapers were so indiscreet as to declare boldly and with great headlines. day after day that we were on the verge of war with Japan. It is true that the ques

state of Japanese feeling some weeks ago. But on the part of neither government was the incident looked upon as one that could by any chance lead to hostilities. There had not arisen even the slightest diplomatic friction between the Japanese and American authorities. The people of the United States would not have allowed themselves to be dragged into war unless thrown upon the defensive by an unprovoked attack.

Japan, England,

Japan nor the United States could gain anything by a war, and both would suffer frightfully and needlessly. As for the position of Great Britain, there is probably not a human being in the entire British Empire, regarded by his neighbors as of sound mind, who has conceived it possible that by means of a question of school policy in San Francisco respecting Oriental children, the two halves of the English-speaking world could be set at the task of destroying one another. And yet a good many newspapers of wide circulation in the United States have published alarming headlines in bold type which were meant to create the impression that we were on the edge of deadly conflict, not only with Japan but also with Great Britain.

Good Sense at the Helm.

Meanwhile our official relations with Japan had been of the most perfectly cordial nature, and every single day during all that period of discussion had given fresh evidence of the unprecedented cordiality of the relations between England and this country. The Swettenham incident at an earlier period of our history would have been rather seriously disturbing. An American admiral had gone to the relief of an earthquake-stricken town in the British West Indies to render friendly aid, and had been offensively ordered away by the governor of the island. The news papers printed thousands of columns about it all, while the governments at Washington and London did not allow it to disturb

There was much needless newspaper discussion of the question and War. whether or not England, by virtue of her alliance with Japan, would have been compelled to join in war upon this country. The idea seems too foolish to be dignified by anything more than a passing allusion. England's purpose in the alliance with Japan was the preservation of the status quo in Asia. It was desired by the two allied parties to protect China against further dismemberment, to strengthen England's position in India, to prevent the absorption of Persia by Russia or any other power, and to give general security to Japan in the enjoyment of the moderate fruits of her great triumph over Russia. Nothing could have been farther from the intention of England or of Japan than to join in an alliance that could be turned against the United States of America for any purpose whatsoever. For it was all along perfectly understood that in sentiment the United States had been the leader of the world in the doctrine that China should not be dismembered or unduly exploited; while the United States had also been the leader in emancipating Japan from the oppressive commercial treaties that were abrogated some years ago. The governments of both countries were doing their best to remove grounds of difference. Nothing had happened that could be construed by any reasonable mind as affording a cause even for sharp diplomatic correspondence between the two countries, much less as cause for going to war.

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THE PRESIDENT CROWNED AGAIN.

From the World (New York).

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