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FERTILE FOR ITS RECEPTION, would fail to produce its fruits. The "Christian Times" has, in two of its numbers,* furnished two articles, drawn up with considerable ability, and which cannot be read with other than painful interest. A truly deplorable list is given of the Oxford and Cambridge seceders. It is observed by the writer:"The Oxford List, for the correctness of which we venture to vouch, is subjoined. It is a most serious and lamentable document;—in producing it, we would earnestly deprecate the idea of holding up the names of any to reprobation,—SORROW AND Most painful REGRET WOULD BE THE FEELINGS EXCITED IN THE BREASTS OF RIGHT-MINDED PROTESTANTS; but THE FACTS, IN THEIR MAGNITUDE, should be presented, and ought to sink deeply into the mind of the nation.

"To those who see THE IRRECONCILABLE ANTAGONISM between the system of Rome and the teaching of the New Testament, it would be a strange and conflicting thing that even five or ten members of the University-the teacher of teachers, sent for the defence of the Gospel and the propagation of the truth-these few would indicate the set of a mental current, and the operation of powerful, though unseen, influences. But what can be said; not fives or tens, but such numbers as are presented thus secede to Rome, from the Universities and the Church.

"As we glance down the list, and look at College after College, we see THE UNIVERSALITY OF THE INFECTION. Going from ancient University, from Balliol, from Merton-going from these ancient houses down to the last created and endowed College-upon each and all the plague spot is perceived. The leprosy of a common infection is upon every College." The subjoined list will exhibit, in some degree, the extent of the "common infection" thus adverted to, and the reader is now presented with a statement from the source to which reference has been made, in the first place of the OXFORD SECEDERS :UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 13 Perverts. CORPUS CHRISTI COLL. 3 Perverts.

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The twenty Colleges of Oxford now enumerated, have produced, it will be observed, according to the document quoted, NINETY-TWO PERVERTS TO THE PAPAL CHURCH. Notice will now be taken of the number of Perverts to Popery contributed by the CAMBRIDGE Uni

VERSITY.

TRINITY COLLEGE 22 Perverts.

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE 10 Perverts. CORPUS CHRISTI COLL. 2 Perverts.

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In all 55. Or the two Universities giving together a total, according to the analytical view quoted, 147 Perverts from professedly Protestant Oxford and Cambridge, to the Church of Rome.*

It is said these are but the first fruits, or the earnest of extensive Puseyite inoculation. The shades of difference between Puseyism and Popery being comparatively so imperceptible as to enable the professors of the former to conform, or glide in with ease, to the formula of the latter.

Mr. Seymours, in his "Mornings among the Jesuits in Rome,” states that in a conversation with one of them, it was declared that the Jesuits had secret sources of information regarding the religious condition of this country :-"That there was a large section of the Church of England-and that too an increasing section-steadily and surely inclined to the Church of Rome; and added that, although I might not be aware of the fact, YET HE KNEW IT FROM SOURCES OF INFORMATION THAT WERE NOT ACCESSIBLE TO ALL, that multitudes in England were privately coming over to the Church of Rome."

The Papists rejoice over the adhesions to popery of a Spencer, a Fielding, a Newman, a Wilberforce, a Manning, or a Simeon, and some others of lesser distinction. There is, doubtless, a deep, wide-spread, and insidious under-current at work against the Protestantism of this country. Nor need there be any hesitation in declaring that there is too much reason to fear that JESUITISM, by its inconceivable agencies, BOTH WITHIN AND WITHOUT THE CHURCH, AS WELL AS AT THE UNIVERSITIES, IS EXERCISING A POWER WHICH NO LAW CAN REACH.

The British Quarterly Review, in noticing several works upon Jesuitism, thus comments upon its nature, principles, and practice :

"Jesuitism is the army of Papal Rome. Every army must have weapons of offence and defence. Of special necessity are arms to

* For names of THE Oxford and Cambridge PERVERTS, see Appendix B.

Jesuitism in these times when it is intensely hated, and when it is subject to assaults from so many quarters. In Rome, at this hour, Jesuitism and the Inquisition stand side by side frowning defiance on the world, which has learnt to keep these, its deadly enemies, at bay, but which, at the earliest relaxation of its vigilance, WOULD

BURST FORTH INTO UNPRECEDENTED ACTIVITY AND LAY IT WASTE.

"The secrecy of Jesuitism is the chief source of our dread. Secrecy is its essence. In secrecy has it wrapped its workings from the earliest period until now. Secret for the most part in Catholic lands, its operations among Protestants are covered with the thickest veil. It not only studies but seems to love secrecy. Like certain animals, it has lived in the dark so long that it instinctively shrinks from the light.

"In England a Jesuit is a rare sight. When seen he is not known. Nor is he here seen in any outward and visible form. Jesuits there are in the land-but who can point them out? An ordinary Catholic priest has his insignia, which marks him out as distinctly as any soldier of the line. But what are the signs of a Jesuit? His is a hidden presence, and being hidden it is feared. Here is something which cannot be put down, because it cannot be grappled with. IT HAS NO BODILY SHAPE, NO VISIBLE FORM. IT GLIDES AMONGST IT STEALS

AND AROUND US LIKE AN EVIL SPIRIT FROM BENEATH.
INTO NURSERIES. IT CREEPS INTO THE CREDULOUS HEARTS OF LOVE-
LORN SPINSTERS AND SILLY GOVERNESSES. IT THROWS OUT LURES TO
FANTASTIC BEINGS IN THE SHAPE OF MEN, AND IT PLIES ITS SNARES
TO CATCH FOPPISH YOUNG CLERGYMEN, TO WHOM DOUBT IS TROUBLE-
SOME, AND THOUGHT IMPOSSIBLE. Did Jesuits walk our streets IN
THEIR OWN PROPER PERSONS they would appear less formidable.”*

As to ascertaining the number of Jesuits, it is perfectly out of the question. In returns to an order of the House of Commons, made in 1836, it is made to appear that there was NOT ONE JESUIT IN ENGLAND! or came into England from the year 1829 to 1836. Wales showed one. Fifty-seven are registered for Ireland. How many Jesuits existed in the country before 1829 is not stated, nor does any official document make known their increase or decrease since 1836. As justly remarked by the British Quarterly, "In face of law, then, England was free from Jesuits-not one in all her borders! Yet it is a matter of public notoriety that at the same time there existed, and had long existed, the present Jesuits' College at Stonyhurst." And this institution has been for years sending forth its missionaries and priests.

* Jesuitism as it is.-British Quarterly Review, May, 1851.

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Some statistics are given of Jesuits. From Romish authorities it is stated that they number 5,470; and 880 of that fraternity it is said are engaged in England. This island receives a due share of attention from General Roothaan-about one-sixth of his army being here engaged in active warfare. Whether or not so large a number is employed in England he cannot say; but their numbers are such as to justify the friends of Scriptural Christianity in calling for counteraction."*

In the "Parliamentary Returns," from the numbers attempted to be ascertained in 1836, it is made to appear that "England was free from Jesuits." What is NOW said respecting them?

"ENGLAND IS BESET BY JESUITS. We know what we say. This is not the place for evidence. We simply give the results of inquiry; and we repeat-England is beset by Jesuits. They are here for our conversion; their aim is TO BRING the land over TO ROMANISM. By fair means if possible-BY FOUL MEANS IF NECESSARY,-they have vowed to subject us to the yoke which our fathers found so galling and hateful.

"Nor are their efforts unproductive. Catholicism has increased and is increasing; in the efforts of Jesuitism Is THE CHIEF CAUSE. Of all countries England is now the grand object of the Jesuits' desire. England conquered, THE CONQUEST OF THE WORLD IS EASY. England, therefore, is made THE SPECIAL POINT OF ATTACK. From all quarters of the Catholic world arrows are directed against England; while in our very midst Jesuitism is busily and ardently at work SAPPING THE GROUND ON WHICH WE TREAD, AND UNDERMINING THE CHURCHES, THE SOCIETIES, THE GOSPEL WHICH WE LOVE.

"There are Jesuits in England-many Jesuits, WELL ORGANISED, WITH A RECOGNISED HEAD, AND AN INTIMATE CONNECTION WITH ROME; THEY ARE A LARGE BAND; THEY HAVE A DEFINITE OBJECT; THEY

ACT AS ONE MAN-Sometimes they seek their object on the platform, in the pulpit, through the press; but who knows them? who can point them out? The police can detect a pickpocket, but who can unmask a Jesuit? THEY ARE IN ALL RANKS, ALL SOCIETIES; they meet us in our daily walks; they eat with us in the tavern, and read by our side in the news-room; but who can say "That man is a Jesuit?-cornu ferit ille, caveto.'

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Already they HAVE effected much; MORE THEY ARE PREPARING to effect. MORE, MUCH MORE, THEY WILL effect, unless THEY ARE HUNTED OUT, EXPOSED, WITHSTOOD, CONFUTED, AND PUT TO FLIGHT.

* Jesuitism as it is.-British Quarterly Review, May, 1851.

To a much greater extent than is generally supposed, THE LIBERTIES OF EUROPE, AS WELL AS ITS RELIGION, DEPEND ON THE ISSUE.'

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What said that profound student and great discriminator of human character, NAPOLEON, respecting THE JESUITS, whom he designated as a very dangerous society, and one which should never have been admitted on the soil of the Empire. The doctrines of Jesuitism ARE SUBVERSIVE OF ALL MONARCHICAL PRINCIPLES. The General of the Jesuits insists on being sovereign master,-SOVEREIGN OVER THE SOVEREIGN. Wherever the Jesuits are admitted THEY WILL BE MASTERS, COST WHAT IT MAY. Their society is by nature dictatorial, and, therefore, it is THE IRRECONCILABLE ENEMY OF ALL CONSTITUTED AUTHORITY. Every act, every crime, however atrocious, is a meritorious work, if it is committed for the interest of the Society of Jesus, or by order of the General of the Jesuits.†

THE AGGRESSION of Rome is the question of the day, and it has been for the Session of 1851 the question of the British legislature. The Pope appointed a Cardinal and an Archbishop of Westminster, and several Catholic Bishops have been consecrated to their respective Sees. Bulls and Pastorals have been issued; and from the extent with which papistical doctrines had been diffused in the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and embraced by many of its members, added to these also the correspondent views entertained by a large section within the Protestant pale, there might have appeared to the Papal conclave but little to be accomplished in Protestant Britain to bring over, into the bosom of the One Holy Catholic Church, her erring children of the Anglican Church.

The letter of LORD JOHN RUSSELL to the Bishop of Durham upon the Papal Aggression, conveys the sentiments of THE PREMIER, and as the document has been the subject of such general comment, it should receive a prominent notice in connection with the arrogant assumptions of Rome.

"TO THE RIGHT REV. THE BISHOP OF DURHAM.

"MY DEAR LORD,-I agree with you in considering the late aggression of the Pepe upon our Protestantism, 6 as insolent and insidious,' and I therefore feel as indignant as you can do upon the subject. I not only promoted to the utmost of my power the claims of the Roman Catholics to all civil rights, but I thought it right, and even desirable, that the ecclesiastical system of the Roman Catholics should be the means of giving instruction to the numerous Irish immigrants in London and elsewhere, who, without such help,

* Monthly Christian Spectator, May, 1851.
† Recits de la captivité, &c., tome 2, p. 274.

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