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THE FIRST DAY AT THE CANTONMENT.

The accompanying illustration, taken at Camp Dix, New Jersey, one of the thirty-two major cantonments utilized during the War to train the American Expeditionary Forces, gives an excellent idea of the civilian appearance of the men drafted into the American army, as they appeared upon arrival at camp.

of water power sites in different parts of the United States for the purposes prescribed by the statute, and will recommend a site or sites for the plant or plants which in its judgment should be established.

This board will have power to direct other representatives of their own or other Departments of the Government to appear before it to give information, aid or advice, and to employ such clerical assistance as may be necessary.

A complete record and minutes of the proceedings of this board will be kept, and a full report of the board, with the record of its proceedings and its recommendations, will be submitted to the President. WOODROW WILSON.

PROCLAMATIONS

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

[Enlarging Whitman National Forest, Oregon.]

Whereas, it appears that the lands hereinafter described, in the State of Oregon, have been found by the Secretary of Agriculture to be chiefly valuable for the production of timber or for the protection of stream flow; and

Whereas, it appears that such lands should be added to the Whitman National Forest;

Now, therefore, I, WOODROW WILSON, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the power in me vested by section I of the Act of Congress approved September 8, 1916 (39 Stat., 852), entitled "An Act Authorizing an adjustment of the boundaries of the Whitman National Forest, in the State of Oregon, and for other purposes," do proclaim that the boundaries of the Whitman National Forest are hereby changed to include the following described lands:

Parts of townships 10, 11 and 12, ranges 34, 35 and 36, east of Willamette meridian, as shown on map submitted.

The withdrawal made by this proclamation shall, as to all lands which are at this date legally appropriated under the public land laws or reserved for any public purpose, be subject to and shall not interfere with or defeat legal rights under such appropriation, nor prevent the use for such public purpose of lands so reserved, so long as such appropriation is legally maintained or such reservation remains in force.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this thirty-first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and seventeen, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and forty-first.

[SEAL.]

By the President:

ROBERT LANSING, Secretary of State.

WOODROW WILSON.

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BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

[Declaring an Emergency in Water Transportation of the United States.] Whereas, Congress did by "An Act To establish a United States Shipping Board for the purpose of encouraging, developing and creating a naval auxiliary and naval reserve and a merchant marine to meet the requirements of the commerce of the United States with its Territories and possessions and with foreign countries; to regulate carriers by water engaged in the foreign and interstate commerce of the United States; and for other purposes," approved September 7, 1916, provide that "during any national emergency the existence of which is declared. by proclamation of the President, no vessel registered or enrolled and licensed under the laws of the United States shall, without the approval of the board, be sold, leased or chartered to any person not a citizen of the United States, or transferred to a foreign registry or flag";

And whereas, many shipowners of the United States are permitting their ships to pass to alien registers and to foreign trades in which we do not participate, and from which they cannot be bought back to serve the needs of our water-borne commerce without the permission of governments of foreign nations;

Now, therefore, I, WOODROW WILSON, President of the United States of America, acting under and by virtue of the authority conferred in me by said Act of Congress, do hereby declare and proclaim that I have found that there exists a national emergency arising from the insufficiency of maritime tonnage to carry the products of the farms, forests, mines and manufacturing industries of the United States to their consumers abroad and within the United States, and I do hereby admonish all citizens of the United States and every person to abstain from every violation of the provisions of said Act of Congress, and I do hereby warn them that all violations of such provisions will be rigorously prosecuted, and I do hereby enjoin upon all officers of the United States, charged with the execution of the laws thereof, the utmost diligence in preventing violations of said Act, and this my proclamation issued thereunder, and in bringing to trial and punishment any offenders against the same.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this 5th day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and seventeen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and forty-first.

[SEAL.]

By the President:

ROBERT LANSING, Secretary of State.

WOODROW WILSON.

SECOND INAUGURAL ADDRESS

Delivered before the Public on the Front Portico of the Capitol at Washington, D. C., March 5, 1917.]

MY FELLOW CITIZENS:

The four years which have elapsed since last I stood in this place have been crowded with counsel and action of the most vital interest and consequence. Perhaps no equal period in our history has been so fruitful of important reforms in our economic and industrial life or so full of significant changes in the spirit and purpose of our political action. We have sought very thoughtfully to set our house in order, correct the grosser errors and abuses of our industrial life, liberate and quicken the processes of our national genius and energy, and lift our politics to a broader view of the people's essential interests.

It is a record of singular variety and singular distinction. But I shall not attempt to review it. It speaks for itself and will be of increasing influence as the years go by. This is not the time for retrospect. It is time rather to speak our thoughts and purposes concerning the present and the immediate future.

Although we have centered counsel and action with such unusual concentration and success upon the great problems of domestic legislation to which we addressed ourselves four years ago, other matters have more and more forced themselves upon our attention-matters lying outside our own life as a nation and over which we had no control, but which, despite our wish to keep free of them, have drawn us more and more irresistibly into their own current and influence.

It has been impossible to avoid them. They have affected the life of the whole world. They have shaken men everywhere with a passion and an apprehension they never knew before. It has been hard to preserve calm counsel while the thought of our own people swayed this way and that under their influence. We are a composite and cosmopolitan people. We are of the blood of all the nations that are at war. The currents of our thoughts as well as the currents of our trade run quick at all seasons back and forth between us and them. The war inevitably set its mark from the first alike upon our minds, our industries, our commerce, our politics and our social action. To be indifferent to it, or independent of it, was out of the question.

And yet all the while we have been conscious that we were not part of it. In that consciousness, despite many divisions, we have drawn closer together. We have been deeply wronged upon the seas, but we have not wished to wrong or injure in return; have retained throughout the consciousness of standing in some sort apart, intent upon an interest that transcended the immediate issues of the war itself.

As some of the injuries done us have become intolerable we have still been clear that we wished nothing for ourselves that we were not

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