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FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1901.

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reasons for the revision of the act. Your Council, however, have to regret the difficulty the Hon. Secretary experiences in getting members to read papers, and hope that a hint that volunteers in this direction will be gladly welcomed will be sufficient.

Your Council have great pleasure in being able to announce that the Branch's invitation to the British Dental Association to hold their Annual Meeting for 1903 in Brighton was accepted, the time being fixed for June 18, 19, and 20, and that Mr. Walter Harrison was elected as President-elect. Your Council feel the greatest confidence that all the members of the Southern Counties Branch will do their utmost to make the meeting a success.

The suggestion of the Western Counties Branch to hold a joint meeting has been adopted. The meeting takes place in January, 1903, at Bournemouth. During the coming year the revised Articles and Bye-Laws now under consideration by a Committee will come before the Branch for their approval and suggestions, and will need the most careful consideration.

Your Council have decided that the travelling expenses of the Branch representative to the Board meetings shall be paid, and they recommend the nomination of Mr. Walter Harrison as President-elect, and that the next Annual Meeting be held in Brighton on Wednesday, June 17, immediately before the Annual General Meeting of the Parent Association, and that ordinary meetings be held at Redhill in October, 1902, Bournemouth (with the Western Counties Branch) in January, 1903, and Hastings in April, 1903.

During the past year there has been five Council Meetings, the attendance of members being as follows: Messrs. J. H. Reinhardt, A. King, G. O. Richards, W. Harrison, Morgan Hughes, J. C. Foran, H. Beadnell Gill and W. Barton, 5; F. R. Flintan, John Wood and A. L. Goadby, 4; J. Dennant and F. V. Richardson, 2; S. Lee Rymer, W. B. Bacon and L. Maxwell, 1; and C. S. Reed, elected in place of J. F. Rymer (resigned), 1 out of 1.

The PRESIDENT said that arising out of the Council's Report he might state that immediately on the announcement of the death of Mr. Rogers, of Winchester, he wrote a letter of condolence and sympathy to Mrs. Rogers on behalf of the Branch.

Mr. BOWDEN moved the adoption of the Council's Report, and this was seconded by Mr. TROLLOPE and unanimously agreed to.

The PRESIDENT said he saw the next item on the agenda was a valedictory address by himself. He never gave an address in his life, and he was not going to begin now. He hoped he had done his duty during the past year. He had really tried, and if he had failed, it was from the want of ability and not from the want of will. He thought they were getting along very nicely indeed. The Branch was steadily increasing in numbers, and they were all getting to know each other better and better, and the better they knew each other the better fellows they found they all were. All he now had to do was to induct Mr. Arthur King into that chair. He was sure they could not find a better man to succeed a poorer.

Mr. ARTHUR KING then took the Chair, amidst applause. He said the first thing he should like to do was to propose a very hearty vote of thanks to their late President for the exceedingly able way in which he had managed their meetings, and ruled when they were in or out of order, and succeeded in maintaining such a large amount of harmony at all the meetings. He thought

the thanks of the whole of the members of that Branch were due to Mr. Reinhardt for his very able management of their affairs during the past year. Mr. ROBBINS Seconded, and the vote was cordially adopted.

The PRESIDENT then delivered his inaugural address.'

Mr. REINHARDT said he thought they would all wish to thank Mr. King for his address, and said he thought he had very properly referred to the attacks which had been made on some of the old members of the Association.

The PRESIDENT expressed his thanks for the way they had received Mr. Reinhardt's remarks. He saw the next business was to select two scrutineers to count the voting papers. Two voting papers were spoiled.

Mr. Mountford and Mr. Foran were selected scrutineers, and they subsequently announced that the result of the voting was the election of Messrs. G. O. Richards, D. E. Caush, Vernon Knowles, H. W. Van der Pant and F. Bell to the Council.

The meeting then proceeded to the election of officers.

The PRESIDENT proposed that Mr. Walter Harrison should be the President-elect. This was seconded by Mr. J. WOOD, supported by Mr. Reinhardt, and unanimously agreed to.

Mr. WALTER HARRISON said he was extremely obliged to them for the kind and continued confidence they had shown in him. They had placed him in a very exalted position during the coming year, and but that he knew their kindness and help were behind him he should not have considered the nomination. He knew they would all do their level best, and he would do his, and he hoped that during the next year they would make a record in the Annual Meetings of the British Dental Association.

Mr. BEADNELL GILL proposed the election of Mr. S. Lee Rymer, Mr. Dennant and Mr. Reinhardt as Vice-Presidents for the coming year. Mr. RICHARDS seconded, and the proposition was unanimously carried.

Mr. ELLWOOD proposed the re-election of Mr. Walter Harrison as Hon. Treasurer, remarking that he had shown himself to be one of the most able hon. treasurers they had ever had. Mr. CAUSH seconded the proposition, which was unanimously agreed to.

Mr. MORGAN HUGHES proposed that Mr. Walter R. Wood be re-elected Hon. Secretary. They would agree with him that they had been very fortunate indeed in the choice of a new secretary. He thought they had all experienced the benefit of Mr. Wood's systematic methods in arranging the business both of the Council and the Association.

Mr. WALTER HARRISON seconded, remarking that they had one of the best secretaries they had ever had. Mr. Wood was very sincere in his work, and had even started a bureau, so that the work might be carried out in a methodical manner.

Mr. REINHARDT said that, as the member who had the most to do with the Hon. Secretary for the last year, and as one who had received thanks for work which was really done by Mr. Wood, he wished to endorse all that had been said.

The motion was carried unanimously.

On the proposition of Mr. BARTON, seconded by Mr. TROLLOPE, Mr. D. E.

To be published as an Original Communication.

Caush and Mr. A. R. Roberson were elected auditors; but on it subsequently transpiring that Mr. Caush had been elected a member of the Council, Mr. T. H. Elliott was elected an auditor in his place, on the motion of Mr. REINHARDT, seconded by Mr. WoOD.

Mr. MORGAN HUGHES then moved the resolution standing on his name :Mr. PRESIDENT AND FELLOW MEMBERS OF THE SOUTHERN COUNTIES BRANCH,-We have already expressed our deliberate opinion as a Branch that amendment of the laws relating to the practice of dentistry is necessary both to dentists and to the public. Unless we have changed that opinion since the Croydon meeting-and as far as I am concerned I see no valid reason why we should-it is not necessary for me to take up your time by speaking to the first part of the Resolution I have the honour to bring forward.

I was told by a friend who was present at the dinner of the Metropolitan Branch, and which I was unfortunately unable to attend, that Mr. Charles Tomes had taken a very gloomy view of our prospects of obtaining any additional dental legislation from Parliament, and I was therefore glad to have an opportunity of reading those remarks when subsequently published in the Journal. Anything that Mr. Charles Tomes says or thinks is worthy of our closest attention. I have studied his speech very carefully, and do not look upon it as so depressing as my friend did.

In the first place, he thoroughly agrees with us that the present state of the law is unsatisfactory. His exact words are "No one can seriously dispute that anything short of a prohibition of practice is utterly unsatisfactory; the only point for argument is how, and more particularly when, to make the effort to get something better."

He then proceeds to give reasons why he fears the present time is inopportune for getting any dental legislation through the House of Commons. One of his principal reasons, however, was based upon premises that have since turned out to be erroneous. He laid great stress upon the rejection in Committee of a clause in the Midwives Bill prohibiting the habitual practice of midwifery for gain. That decision of the Committee has, since Mr. Tomes spoke, been overruled by the House of Commons itself, and that in spite of the opposition of the Home Secretary and of the lack of precedent for such provision in either the Medical or Dental Acts. This clause, having passed successfully through the second reading in the House of Commons, and I see by this morning's paper that it has also passed its second reading in the House of Lords, may therefore be considered in the ordinary course of events to be safe.

Now, gentlemen, I consider the passing of this clause prohibiting the habitual practice for gain a most important and encouraging precedent for us. It shows what power medical men have when they approach the House of Commons unanimously and through their accredited representatives, and it shows that there is a large amount of common sense in the House of Commons. They saw that the Bill was useless without some such provision; and being anxious to secure the welfare of poor women in their hour of trouble, carried the amendment somewhat against the advice of their more cautious legal advisers. I think it is only reasonable to suppose that what the House of Commons is willing to do for a body of poorly-educated and qualified midwives they will also be more willing to do for an educated and qualified body of medical or dental practitioners.

Mr. Tomes also cautions us-and I presume the caution was especially intended for rash readers of papers like myself-against proclaiming the weakness of our Act upon the housetops. Gentlemen, with all due respect I do not believe in the policy of the ostrich, who is supposed to bury his head in the sand at the approach of danger. And surely the weakness of our Act is already proclaimed too widely not only upon the housetops, but upon the windows, walls, and doors of the unregistered dental quack in the chief streets of every town, for the discussion of its failings at our small private meetings, or even its limited publication through our Journal, to teach the would-be evader of our Act anything he did not already know. Again, it is necessary for us to realise the weakness of our position before we can take steps to strengthen it, and I am not sure that it will not be also necessary for us to let the public know how little they are protected from dental imposture before we can enlist public sympathy on our side.

Mr. Tomes finally recommends that dentists should set to work to educate the public. If my resolution is carried, we shall be on the way to find out how to do this. I claim, therefore, that my resolution is in harmony with Mr. Tomes' views. It does not commit us to any rash or premature action in the House of Commons, and is, I think, the right and constitutional method of preparing ourselves for the effort that must be made without undue haste or unnecessary waste of time. I believe our objects can be best attained by the Representative Board appointing a small but powerful committee, not necessarily confined to members of that Board, who should be empowered to formulate the legislation the profession needs, and to suggest methods by which we can begin the work of educating and influencing public opinion in favour of such legislation. I hope, therefore, that if our Branch will support the motion that I intend shortly to bring before the Representative Board, and which I have reason to believe will meet with further support from other important Branches, the work of organising fresh dental legislation will be set going in the right way, and will fall into the right hands for carrying it to a successful issue.

Gentlemen, I must apologise for the very hasty way in which I have put together these few remarks, but feel that the resolution speaks for itself. I am anxious to hear the opinions of others, and trust that members will give us the benefit in public of those opinions that their modesty too frequently keeps only for the ears of their personal friends. Thanking you for your kind attention, I move the following resolution :

:

"That this meeting of the Southern Counties Branch of the British Dental Association, being fully convinced of the necessity of fresh legislation to prevent the practice of dentistry by unregistered persons, respectfully request the Representative Board to consider the matter at an early date, and suggest that a committee of enquiry be appointed to report what legislation is necessary, and to make suggestions as to the best means of influencing public opinion in favour of such legislation."

Mr. ELLWOOD seconded. He congratulated the Branch on the very lucid manner in which Mr. Morgan Hughes had presented the matter, and also on the kindly manner in which he gave credit, in contradistinction to some of the journalistic effusions they had seen, to those pioneers of dental reform who in the past did good and yeoman service. Far be it from them to detract in any way from the good that had been already done, but the time had come when

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