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factory evidence of the inability of the civil authorities to suppress any disorder, and until the proper call is made by the Governor of the State. Captain Mills is an officer in whose judgment I should place great reliance. He should be instructed to inquire into the conduct and capacity of the civil authorities, and to report whether they have done their duty; keep me advised promptly by telegraph, and direct General Sibley to have troops ready to send, in case I should deem it proper to send them. A telegram will reach me at the War Department to-morrow.

A true copy:

(Signed)

GEORGE G. MEADE,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

Major General.

PHILADELAHIA, September 22, 1868.

General R. C. Drum, Atlanta, Georgia:

Send an officer to inquire into and report all the facts connected with the riot said, in this morning's telegram, to have occurred yesterday at Camilla, in Southwest Georgia, unless you have already reliable information on the subject. Reply to-day to this place; tomorrow to Washington.

A true copy:

(Signed)

GEORGE G. MEADE,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

Major General.

ATLANTA, GEORGIA, September 23, 1868.

Major General George G. Meade, (care of War Department):

Your two telegrams reached me last night. Your wish relative to detail of Captain Mills, had been anticipated, as my telegram of yesterday will have informed you. Both Houses of the State Legislature have rassed resolutions that the presence of troops is not necessary, and that the civil authorities are competent to take care of matters. General Sibley has been instructed as you direct. (Signed) R. C. DRUM,

A true copy:

Assistant Adjutant General.

R. Č. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., September 23, 1868.

General Drum, Atlanta, Georgia :

Call by telegraph on commanders of Districts to submit a project for the distribution of their commands, within the limits of their Districts for the purpose of preserving order during the approaching Presidential election, and the political campaign preceding the same. The posts should not be less than a company, and so distributed as to enable detachments to be made to places in the vicinity, if necessary. The troops to be prepared to go into camp, if quarters cannot be temporarily hired. The movement in regard to supplies and quarters, to be considered as that of a moveable column-the troops being held ready at any moment to move from point to point as may be nec

essary.

Let this call be answered in writing, and direct District commanders to confer with Governors of States

A true copy:

(Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

Major General Ú. S. A.

ATLANTA, GEORGIA, Sept. 30, 1868. Honorable Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.: Morning's telegrams announce you are to give to-day, to the Alabama delegation, a letter of instructions addressed to me. If this is so-and I shall be glad to hear it is--I beg you will send me a copy by telegraph, as it will aid me in the order I am preparing, distributing the troops. Every thing is quiet in the Department, the Camilla affair, having only resulted in a little political riot. I am awaiting the report of investigating officer to transmit the same.

A true copy:

(Signed)

GEORGE G. MEADE,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

Major General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, September 30, 1868. [Received at Atlanta, Georgia, September 30, 1868]

To Major General George G. Meade, Commanding Department of the South:

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The instructions sent you to-day, consist of a reference of the Alabama memorial to you, for your action, under the instructions heretofore given; and with the Presidents wish that you exercise within the limits of lawful authority, full discretion and preserve the peace. (Signed) J. M. SCHOFIELD,

A true copy:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

Secretary of War.

COLUMBIA, S. C., October 3, 1868. Received at Atlanta, Georgia, October 3, 1868. Major General George G. Meade, Commanding:

Since writing affairs are greatly aggravated. Several wanton murders have been committed. A State Senator, on his way home, was met by a mob at Chester last night, who threatened his life if he attempted to proceed, and he was compelled to return. Armed men patrol the roads. The civil authorities are powerless to enforce the laws. Instructions to General Bomford are necessary for the maintenance of the supremacy of the State government.

A true copy:

(Signed)

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

R. K. SCOTT,

Governor.

ATLANTA, GEORGIA, October 3, 1868.

R. K. Scott, Governor, Columbia, South Carolina:

Colonel Bomford under date of September 15, was furnished with the instructions received by me from the War Department. I have no authority to employ the troops except under the conditions speci

fied in the letter from the War Department, dated August 25, a copy of which will be sent by mail, and which you can see by asking Colonel Bomford, as it was sent to him on the 15th instant. I shall in a few days issue an order distributing, till after the election, the troops under Colonel Bomford's command-but they will not be able to act, except under the prescribed conditions given and when duly called on in the mode indicated in the instructions.

A true copy:

(Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

Major General.

ATLANTA, GEORGIA, October 6, 1868.

General Grant, Washington, D. C.:

I forward an outline of an order to be at once issued, on which I desire the comments of yourself, Secretary of War and the President. I am of opinion the moral effect of this order, and the distribution of troops will tend greatly to allay existing excitements, and to remove some existing delusions. In connection with this measure, it would have a very beneficial effect, if a movement could be made-say of one or two companies to each of the following places :-Raleigh, Columbia, Atlanta and Montgomery, to act as reserves until after the election. The mere arrival and passage through the country will have a great effect, as indicating the determination of the authorities at Washington to sustain me.

(Signed)

GEORGE G. MEADE,

Major General.

The following is an extract of the order referred to: HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, ATLANTA GEORGIA, October 8, 1868.

GENERAL ORDERS

(Exxtract.)

No. 27.

Whereas, by an act of Congress of the United States, approved March 2d, 1865, it is made the duty of the military authority to preserve the peace at the polls at any election that may be held in any of the States; and Whereas, this duty has become the more imperative, from the existing political excitement in the public mind, from the recent organization of civil government, and from the fact that Congress has by statute prohibited the organization of military forces in the several States of this Department, it is therefore ordered,

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VIII. District commanders will instruct post commanders in their duties, and the relative position of the civil and military powers. They will furnish them with copies of the circulars from these Headquarters, of August 25, and October 1st ult., (the latter of which was forwarded September 15, to District Commanders,) in which the instructions of the War Department are set forth in full. They will impress on post commanders that they are to act in aid and co-operation, and in subordination to the civil authorities; that they are to exercise discretion and judgment, unbiased by political or other prejudices; that their object should be exclusively to preserve the peace

and uphold law and order, and they must be satisfied such is the object of the civil officer calling on them for aid, that they must in all cases where time will permit, apply for instruction to superior authority, but they must at all hazards preserve the peace, and not be restrained by technical points, when, in their conscientious judgment under the rules above set forth, it is their duty to act. Post Commanders on being notified of the proposed holding of political meetings, may send an officer, and if necessary a detachment, to watch the proceedings and see that the peace is preserved.

IX. To the people of the several States composing the Department, the Major General commanding appeals that they will co-operate with him and the civil authorities in sustaining law and order, in preserving the peace and in avoiding those scenes of riot and bloodshed, and the wanton destruction of property and life, which has already, in some instances, been enacted in the Department. He urges abstinence from all inflammatory and incendiary appeals to the passions; discountenancing the keeping open of liquor shops on days of political meetings and of election; the abstaining from carrying arms, and asserting the individual right of construing laws by force of arms. No just cause is ever advanced by resort to violence. Let there be charity and forbearance among political opponents, whatever may be the result; let each good citizen determine, that all who, under the law, have the right to the ballot, shall exercise it undisturbed. If there are disputed points of law, let them be referred to the courts, and let not mobs or political clubs, or other irresponsible bodies, construe and undertake to execute the law. This appeal is made in the earnest hope that the Major General Commanding can rely on the good sense and correct judgment of the mass of the people, and that he will not be compelled to resort to the exercise of the power with which he is intrusted, and which he will most reluctantly employ. But he thinks it his duty to make known, that so far as the power under his command will admit, he will not permit the peace to be broken, and that he will not be restrained in the conscientious discharge of his duty by technicalities of laws made when the present anomalous condition of affairs were neither anticipated or provided for.

BY ORDER OF MAJOR GENERAL MEADE :
R. C. DRUM,

A true copy:

Assistant Adjutant General.

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, D. C., October 8, 1868. Received Atlanta, Georgia, October 8, 1868. To Major General Meade, Commanding Military Department of the South:

Your dispatch of October 6, has been submitted to the General of the Army, the Secretary of War and to the President of the United States. The General approves your proposed order. The President and Secretary of War do not deem it necessary to add any thing to the instructions heretofore given you, believing those instructions ample for your government.

A true copy:

(Signed)

E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant General.

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

REPORTS

OF CHIEFS OF STAFF DEPARTMENTS ON DUTY AT HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT AND DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH.

Statement showing the amount of labor done at Headquarters, Third Military District and Department of the South, from January 1, 1868, to November 1, 1868, not including papers specially relating to Registration, elections, appointment to office, &c., pertaining to Civil Bureau:

Number of letters received......

......5,432

Number of miscellaneous papers (Inspection reports of property, certificates of disability, furloughs, &c.,) received and acted upon..

Number of endorsements.

Number of letters sent..

Number of General Orders issued,

...

.2,026

.1,883

.6,084

Number of Special Orders issued.........

140

A true copy:

...239

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,
OFFICE OF JUDGE ADVOCATE,

ATLANTA, GEORGIA, Nov. 1, 1868.

Brevet Brigadier General R. C. Drum, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant General, Department of the South.

GENERAL:-I have the honor to transmit herewith a report of the number of cases tried in the Third Military District from January 1, 1868, to July 31, 1868, and in the Department of the South from August 1, 1868, to October 31, 1868.

The nine cases reported as "trial commenced but not completed" were the nine prisoners charged with the murder of G. W. Ashburn,

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