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object seems to be to drive obnoxious men out of the country. If you cannot spare a regiment, any companies you can send will be of great value.

(Signed)

GEORGE G. MEADE,

Major General.

A true copy

R. C. DRUM, Assistanl Adjutant General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 7, 1868.

Major General George G. Meade, Commanding Third Military District Atlanta, Georgia:

Will it not be well to remove all the civil officers in Columbus, and all other places, where like outrages occur.

In Alabama, where outrages are committed, the men elected might be installed.

A true copy

(Signed) U. S. GRANT,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, April 9, 1868.

General U. S. Grant:

I have not removed civil authorities of Columbus, because Captain Mills, commanding there, reported they were acting in concert with him, and evinced every disposition to ferret out murderers. I did not send any Board to investigate, because Mills and his subordinates were doing every thing it was practicable to do. I have been fully alive to the necessity of action, but am waiting till I see the time when action will be available. Captain Mills has made some ten arrests, principally of people whom he has reason to believe have knowledge of the perpetrators of the deed. I have sent Major Smyth, of the Judge Advocate General's Department, to assist in the investigation, and have written to Mills to get his judgment on expediency of making removals of the civil officers. There will be difficulty just now in finding people willing to assume the responsibilities and dangers of the position.

A true copy:

(Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE,

R. C DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

Major General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, April 11, 1868.

General U. S. Grant, Washington, D. C.:

Have requested General Gillem to send companies at once to this place. These, with those from Thomas, will answer all purposes so far as can be anticipated. Matters have become in appearance much quieter, since issuing General Orders No. 51.

A true copy:

(Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE, Major General

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT, ATLANTA, GEORGIA, April 29, 1868. General U. S. Grant, Washington, D. C.:

Election passed off as quietly as could be expected, one or two serious outbreaks only. Many complaints of frauds from both sides, and some applications based on them for re-election. These will be thoroughly investigated, and action predicated on result of investigation. Official returns come in slowly. No accurate judgment can as yet be formed, but the probabilities are that the Constitution is ratified by a very large majority; Bullock, Republican, elected by a small majority, and Democrats carried a majority of the Legislature. No acknowledgment has been received by me of my letter to you of the 16th instant, and I would be relieved to know, at the earliest moment, your views on the points raised therein.

A true copy:

GEORGE G. MEADE,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

Major General.

HEADQUARTERS, WAR DEPARTMENT,

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 29, 1868.

Major General George G. Meade, Commanding Third Military District : I have carefully read your letter of 16th April, and its enclosures. I see nothing in them to change my opinion as expressed to you in my dispatch of March 2, 1868.

The officers elected under the new Constitution of Georgia, are not officers of the Provisional Government referred to in the Reconstruction Acts, nor are they officers elected under any so-called State authority, and are not therefore required to take the oath prescribed in section nine, Act of July 19, 1867. The eligibility to hold office must be determined by the new Constitution, and the Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, designated as Article Fourteen. (Signed) U. S. GRANT, General.

A true copy:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, May 2, 1868.

General U. S. Grant, Washington, D. C. :

Ryland Randolph, editor of the Tuscaloosa Monitor, whose paper has been frequently sent to you, as well as myself, recently assaulted, with intent to kill, a freedman in that town. The disordered condition of the State; the influential position of the criminal, induced General Shepherd to have Randolph arrested and to prefer charges against him, which I have ordered tried by Military Commission. Judge Busteed, of the United States District Court, has granted a writ of habeas corpus returnable on the 5th inst. Under my orders, (General Orders No. 11,) this writ will be obeyed so far as presenting the body in court and making respectful return, setting forth the ground and authority of arrest. It is not known whether Judge Busteed will acknowledge the authority or admit the justification on

the grounds set forth. Should he order the discharge of the prisoner, your opinion of the course to be pursued is solicited. (Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE,

Major General.

A true copy:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., May 4, 1868.

Major General George G. Meade, Commanding: Randolph being taken before a United States Court, I advise submission to decision of that court.

A true copy:

U. S. GRANT,

General.

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, May 8, 1868.

General Grant, Washington, D. C. :

Colonel Sprague telegraphs, election in Florida passed off without disorder; judging from partial returns, Constitution ratified by about three thousand majority, and Reed ticket, (Republican,) elected by a small majority. The official returns have been received in this State from all but one county, and show Constitution ratified by 17,973 majority; Bullock elected by 7,279 majority; Senate 27 Republicans, 16 Democrats, 1 doubtful. House 95 Republicans, 74 Democrats, and 6 doubtful. (Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE, Major General.

A true copy:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., May 9, 1868.

Major General George G. Meade, Commanding : Do you think it advisable to appoint civil officers elected at late election in Georgia to relieve all army officers heretofore appointed by you?

(Signed)

U. S. GRANT,

General.

A true copy:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, May 11, 1868.

General U. S. Grant, Washington, DC..

It was not my intention to put in office any of the civil officers recently elected until Congress had acted on the Constitution. The only army officers detailed are the Governor, Comptroller and Treasurer. The Governor, if put in office, could not appoint any one, and would have to appoint every one through me. I do not desire any such position, and doubt if it would result harmoniously. Again, all appointees would have to take the test oath, and I question whether many of the elected men can do this. I have been greatly embarrassed in the few appointments I have made to find men who

could take this oath. When the Constitution is sent to Congress, if they authorize the civil government going into office in advance of the admission of the State and on the same terms as if the State had been admitted—that is, without requiring the test oath, I think this would be well. I am not disposed to relieve Governor Ruger at present, as there are certain financial and other questions originating under him, which it is due to him, he should have time to adjust and

settle.

I perhaps ought to explain what I mean by want of harmony between the Governor elect and myself. Of course you will understand his appointments will be made on political and party grounds, and will be undoubtedly from his standpoint, on good and sufficient reasons, but I have nothing, and wish to have nothing to do with these matters, and if he makes appointments through me, the responsibility of concurrence, if nothing more, must rest on me.

A true copy:

(Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE, Major General.

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., June 1, 1868. Major General George G. Meade, Commanding Third Military District: I would suggest that the military interfere no obstacle to the meeting of the legislature of Florida. Leave Congress to reject or affirm

their acts.

I do not suggest ordering the legislature to meet, but mere instructions to the commander of the State that he do not interfere in the matter.

A true copy:

(Signed)

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

U. S. GRANT,

General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, June 1, 1868.

General U. S. Grant, Washington, D. C.:

It will not be practicable to adopt your suggestion in regard to the Florida Legislature without some action on my part. When the election of State and County officers were ordered, I directed the returns to be sent to the Superintendent of Registration, instead of the Board of Canvassers, as provided in the ordinance of the Convention. The members of the Legislature cannot get their certificates of election, without my directing the returns to be turned over. My object was and is to retain control of the whole subject, because if the Legislature is permitted to convene without orders from me, and without regard to the paramount authority which the Reconstruction laws vest in me, interminable confusion and conflict of authority will be sure to result. So long as the Reconstruction laws are in force, I should be opposed to the convening of the Legislature, except by my order, and under my authority. If these Legislatures would confine themselves to simply acting on the Fourteenth Article, and then adjourning to await Congressional action, I would not object so much, but once assembled they will do as they please, pass laws inconsistent with my powers and orders, tax ad libitum the State Treasuries, without any

control and without any means of enforcing their acts except through me; whereas, if Congress will only act on the Constitution, and authorize District Commander to instal the elected governments, on some terms as if State was admitted, there would be no difficulty in the Governrr-elect calling together the Legislature, and controlling their actions through the veto. Unless, therefore, you send positive orders, I shall require the Legislatures of Georgia and Florida, to await action of Congress on the presented Constitutions of those States. (Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE,

A true copy:

R. Č. DRUM, Assistant Adjatant General.

Major General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, June 2, 1868.

General U. S. Grant, Washington, D. C.:

Official returns of the Florida election this day received, show for the Constitution, fourteen thousand five hundred and sixty-one (14,561) votes; against the Constitution, nine thousand five hundred and eleven (9,511) votes; majority for the Constitution, five thousand and fifty (5,050) votes. For the office of Governor,-Harrison Reed received fourteen thousand four hundred and twenty-one (14,421) votes; George W. Scott received seven thousand seven hundred and thirty-one (7,781) votes, and Samuel Walker received two thousand two hundred and fifty-seven (2,257) votes. (Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE,

A true copy:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

Major General.

ATLANTA, GEORGIA, June 22, 1868. To Major General George G. Meade, (Care Adjt. General U. S. Army): General Dunn requests me to say that the trial of Columbus prisoners has not yet commenced, nor can it probably before the last of this week. There is no prospect that the trial can be completed before the State is admitted. Can a trial by Military Commission be continued after admission of State? He desires you to see if Congress will not pass an Act for the disposition of all trials that may be pending on admission of a State.

A true copy:

R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant General.

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., June, 26, 1868. Major General George G. Meade, Commanding Third Military District: The act to admit the States of North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Georgia, Alabama and Florida to representation in Congress, became a law June 25, 1868.

Please notify the Governors elect of the States in your district, for under the act, the Governor elect may, if he deems it necessary, con

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