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ATLANTA, GEORGIA, February 29, 1868. General U. S. Grant, Washington, D. C.:

The Florida Convention have submitted to me an ordinance relating to the ratification of the Constitution and election of officers under it. This ordinance provides that when the election is held under my orders for ratification, that the judges, inspectors and other officers shall provide separate ballot boxes, etc., and shall receive the ballots for Congressional, State and County officers, of all persons qualified to vote under the provisions of the Constitution, or, in other words, the votes of persons not registered under the Reconstruction Laws, are to be allowed to vote for these officers. Is this election of officers under the Constitution, and only to take office on the adoption of the Constitution, to be considered as an election for officers under the Provisional Government referred to in section six of Act approved March 2, 1867, and all non-registered voters, excluded by this section at first election held under the new Constitution? Again, the ordinance designates certain days in May for holding the election. Since adjourning, the President of the Convention, on behalf of a majority of its members, applies to have the date of election advanced to some time in April. Does section four of Act approved March 23, 1867, authorize District Commander to fix day of election, or change the same, after the Convention has designated a day?

A true copy.

GEORGE G. MEADE,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

Major General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 2, 1868. Major General George G. Meade, Commanding Third Military District:

The election proposed by the Convention for officers under the new Constitution, I do not consider as an election for officers under the Provisional Government, referred to in Section six (6) of the Act approved March 2, 1867. It is clear to my mind, that a proper construction of Section four (4), of Aet approved March 23, 1867, does not authorize District Commanders to fix or change the day of election, after it has been designated by the Convention.

A true copy

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

U. S. GRANT,

General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, March 6, 1868.

General Grant, Washington, D. C.:

Can you not send me an official or certified copy of the supplementary Reconstruction Act, recently passed by Congress,-I mean the one authorizing elections for State officers, at same time that Constitution is submitted for ratification.

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Major General George G. Meade, Commanding Third Military District : Please transmit immediately, a copy of the protest of the Georgia

Convention, against the proceedings of Governor Jenkins, now pending in the Supreme Court of the United States, which you lately forwarded. The copy to be authenticated by the signatures of the President and Secretary of the Convention, without any State; but certified by you to be genuine signatures of those officers, and that they are the President and Secretary of the State Convention now in session. The paper should reach here before next Friday, and may be sent by special messenger, to be detailed for that purpose. To have the authentication correct, it would be well to send a copy of the authentication by telegraph, omitting the protest itself, so that any changes desired by counsel can be made. Acknowledge this telegraph.

A true copy:

EDWIN M. STANTON.

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, March 9, 1868,

Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR-I send herewith by the hands of Brevet Lieutenant Colonel C. D. Emory, Aide-de-Camp, an official copy of the resolution of the Georgia Convention in relation to the suit brought in the Supreme Court of the United States in the name of the State of Georgia.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A true copy:

(Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE,

Major General U. S. A., Commanding.

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 8, 1868.

Major General George G. Meade, Commanding :

The proposed certificate is right, but to use every precaution, it would be well to add also your affidavit. The papers must be here by Thursday night, and as much earlier as possible.

A true copy:

R. Č. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

E. M. STANTON.

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 7, 1868.

Major General George G. Meade, Commanding:
Law asked for by you, sent by mail.
When may your report on Alabama election be looked for?

A true copy:

(Signed)

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

U. S. GRANT,

General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, March, 9, 1868.

General U. S. Grant, Washington, D, C.:

I have only to-day received report on Alabama election. Vote for Constitution 70,812; against it 1,005; total vote cast 71,817; total vote cast for Convention 91,808; white vote for Constitution 6,702; white vote cast for Convention 18,553: vote on Constitution lacks for

ratification 13,550. Out of 62 Counties, twenty voted four days, thirteen voted two days, and two had no election, the balance, twentyseven, voted five days. I am satisfied the Constitution was lost on its merits, and I think the best to do, would be for Congress to re-assemble the Convention to revise the Constitution and then re-submit it to the people under the new law, giving a majority of votes cast the power to ratify. I do not see much use in re-opening the polls as I proposed, as there is no possibility the votes that would be cast affecting the result. As soon as I can get away from here, I shall go to Montgomery to decide the question. In the mean time, as soon as I can have prepared the data, I will send you a report, showing the election as it took place; this will require perhaps a week.

(Signed)

GEORGE G. MEADE,

Major General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 9, 1868,

Major General George G. Meade, Commanding:
Telegraph me the number of votes cast for Constitution; the num-

ber against, and the total number registered. calls on me for this information.

Resolution of Congress

(Signed)

U. S. GRANT,

General.

A true copy:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, March 10, 1868.

General U. S. Grant, Washington, D. C.:

I telegraphed you yesterday the result of Alabama election. By adding the amount, vote on Constitution fails of ratification, to that vote, and doubling, you will get amount of registered votes, viz: one hundred and ninety thousand seven hundred and thirty four,—but I should explain, that this amount is partly estimated, as some of the counties had not all sent in their revised registration. Again, this amount includes registration in these counties where no election was had, which ought not, in my judgment, to be included. All these points I will give you when my written report goes on. I telegraphed yesterday only the substance of Hayden's report.

(Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE,
Major General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, March 12, 1868.

General Grant, Washington, D. C.:
Alabama election returns show that the vote on Governor is eleven
hundred and eighty-six less than vote on Constitution, and vote on
Probate Judges is seven hundred and forty-two less than vote for
Constitution. I send these because it has been charged that gross
frauds were perpetrated in mutilating the tickets of colored men by
tearing off the vote on the Constitution, and it was predicted that the
vote for Probate Judges would exceed the vote on the Constitution by
many thousands. 1 am of the opinion that most of the charges of ex-
tensive frauds will prove as illusory as the above. There were un-
doubtedly irregularities in the election sufficient to justify its being

set aside as recommended, and I believe a more liberal Constitution would command a majority of votes. In this State and Florida, where the Constitutions do not go beyond the requirements of Congress, but fully comply with them, there seems to be no doubt among all parties but that the people will ratify them by large majorities. The Georgia Convention adjourned yesterday, and the election for ratification will be held on the twentieth proximo.

(Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE, Major General U. S. A.

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 13, 1868.

Major General George G. Meade, Commanding:
The last amendatory Reconstruction Act is now law.

U. S. GRANT,

General.

A true copy:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 13, 1868.

Major General George G. Meade, Commanding Third Military District: If you think it advisable to authorize the Florida election to take place in April, do not permit anything in my dispatch on that subject to keep you from it.

A true copy:

U. S. GRANT,

General.

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, March 14, 1868.

General Grant, Washington, D. C:

Georgia Convention, in ordering election of members of Congress and State officers, after prescribing that at these elections the qualifications for voters shall be the same as prescribed by acts of Congress for voters on ratification, require voters to swear they will support the Constitution submitted, and that they have not prevented, or attempted to prevent, any one from voting. Is this permitted by the law of March 12, 1868, which prescribes that at these elections registered voters may vote? If permitted, do you think any oath should be required of registered voters for officers under the Constitution which is not required of voters on the Constitution?

(Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE.

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 16, 1868. Major General George G. Meale, Commanding Third Military District: Section two of the last amendatory Reconstruction Act provides the same qualifications for voters for members of Congress and the elective officers provided for by the Constitution submitted, as are prescribed for voters on the ratification of the Constitution. Voters on the rati fication of the Constitution cannot, under the law, be required to take the oath prescribed by the Convention, and, in my opinion, it would be in contravention of the acts of Congress to require voters for Con

gressmen and other elective officers to take it. Section second, referred to, is applicable to the Florida election.

A true copy:

U. S. GRANT,

General.

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 28, 1868. Major General George G. Meade, Commanding Third Military District: The motion for injunction against you and General Ruger, and Colonel Rockwell, was postponed by the Court yesterday, until the 1st of December next. E. M. STANTON.

A true copy

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 2, 1868. Major General George G. Meade, Commanding Third Military District, Atlanta, Georgia.

I suggest that the murder of Mr. Ashburn be investigated and justice be meted out promptly by Military Commission if the civil courts cannot be relied on.

A true copy:

(Signed) U. S. GRANT,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, April 3, 1868.

General Grant:

I have just returned from Florida, and find your dispatch in relation to the murder of Mr. Ashburn. Captain Mills, commanding at Columbus, reports he is doing everything in co-operation with the civil authorities, to detect and arrest the murderers; and if any are caught, I intend trying them by Military Commission.

A true copy:

(Signed) GEORGE G. MEADE, Major General.

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA, April 4, 1868.

General Grant, Washington, D. C.:
There are unmistakable signs of disorder in this State and Ala-
bama from secret organizations, such as have disturbed Tennessee. I
am about issuing a very stringent order, and shall take very summary
measures to check this evil, if practicable, but the force under my
command is insufficient to control all parts of these States, and in
view of the approaching elections I would be much relieved if the
forces here could be temporarily increased, say an additional regiment
for two months. The moral effect of re-inforcements would be very
great, besides the actual benefit of additional forces. The people are
becoming alarmed, the negroes getting excited threatening retaliation,
and affairs within the last ten days assuming a serious aspect. The

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