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MONDAY, JANUARY 18, 1875.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Prayer by the Chaplain.

The journal of Friday, January 15, was read and approved.

The President presented a message from the Governor transmitting a communication from the Governor of New Jersey relating to the boundary line between this State and the State of New Jersey; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 17.)

Mr. Wellman presented a petition of persons residing on Genesee river praying for the passage of an act prohibiting the taking of fish from said river for three years; which was read and referred to the committee on internal affairs.

The Assembly returned the concurrent resolution providing for the joint assembly of the Senate and Assembly to compare nominations for the office of United States Senator, with a message that they had concurred in the passage of the same.

The Assembly sent for concurrence a resolution in the words following:

Whereas, The commercial interest of the whole country, and especially of the city and State of New York, demand the early improvement of Harlem river and Spuyten Duyvil creek from the North river to the East river through the Harlem kills, so as to afford a safe and convenient channel for vessels of all classes navigating the North river, and bound for ports on the East river, Long Island Sound, and in the Eastern States, thus shortening the distance of the travel between the North river and the waters of the sound, and of a large portion of the city of Brooklyn lying in the East river and between the North river and the Eastern States by more than twenty miles around the Battery by the tedious, expensive, and unsafe navigation of the waters that skirt the city, and thus avoiding the dangerous passage through Hell-Gate; therefore,

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That our Senators and Representatives in Congress be requested to use their influence for an early appropriation of the amount necessary and requisite for such improvements. On motion of Mr. King, and by unanimous consent, the rules were suspended, in order that said resolution might be considered immediately.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Ordered, That the Clerk return said resolution to the Assembly, with a message informing that the Senate have concurred in the passage of

the same.

Mr. McGowan gave notice that he would, at an early day, ask leave to introduce a bill to incorporate the Richfield Union Agricultural Society.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Selkreg asked and obtained leave to intro duce a bill entitled "An act to repeal an act entitled 'An act relating to

the preservation of fish within the county of Cortland, State of New York, being chapter 336 of the Laws of 1874, so far as the same affects or relates to the inhabitants of the town of Harford in said county, and the waters therein, except private ponds for the propagation and preservation of fish,' passed May 6, 1874," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on internal affairs.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Wellman asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act for the preservation of fish in the waters of the Genesee river, its branches or tributaries, in the county of Allegany," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on internal affairs.

On motion of Mr. Cole, the Senate adjourned.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1875.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Prayer by the Chaplain.

The journal of yesterday was read and approved.

Mr. Lowery presented a petition of the board of supervisors of Oneida county for the extension of the provisions of the law of 1862 to prevent abuses in town and county charges; which was read and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Also, a petition of the board of supervisors of Oneida county for an increase of the annual tax upon dogs; which was read and referred to the committee on agriculture.

The Assembly sent for concurrence the bill entitled as follows:

"An act to extend the time for the collection of taxes in the city of Elmira," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary. By unanimous consent, Mr. McGowan asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to authorize the extension of the time for the collection of taxes in the several towns of the State," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Lowery asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to prevent abuses in town and county charges in criminal cases in the county of Oneida," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Wellman asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to allow commutation for good conduct to convicts confined in the several penitentiaries of the State," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Mr. McGowan moved that the Senate take a recess until five minutes before twelve o'clock, M.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

ELEVEN O'CLOCK AND FIFTY-FIVE MINUTES, A. M.

Senate again met.

Mr. Wood presented a communication from the Comptroller relative to an appropriation to pay Erastus D. Palmer for the bronze statue of Robert R. Livingston; which was read and referred to the committee on finance.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Wood asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act making an appropriation to pay Erastus D. Palmer for the bronze statue of Robert R. Livingston," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on finance.

By unanimous consent, Mr. McGowan asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to authorize plank-road and turnpike companies to reduce the number of their directors," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on roads and bridges.

The hour of twelve o'clock having arrived, the President announced that, pursuant to the statutes of the United States, made and provided, and agreeably to a resolution of the Senate heretofore adopted, the Senate would proceed to nominate a Senator to represent this State in the Congress of the United States in place of Hon. Reuben E. Fenton, whose term of office will expire on the fourth day of March next.

Whereupon each Senator, as his name was called by the Clerk, rose in his place and nominated as follows:

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A quorum having voted, and a majority having named Edwin D. Morgan as their choice, the President announced that Edwin D. Morgan had been nominated, on the part of the Senate, for Senator to represent this State in the Congress of the United States for six years from the fourth day of March next, to fill the vacancy which will occur on that day by the expiration of the term of service of Reuben E. Fenton. On motion of Mr. Cole, the Senate adjourned.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1875.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Prayer by the Chaplain.

The journal of yesterday was read and approved.

Mr. Connolly, from the committee on roads and bridges, to which was referred the bill entitled "An act to authorize plank-road and turnpike companies to reduce the number of their directors," reported in favor of the passage of the same, and said bill was committed to the committee of the whole.

Mr. Woodin, from the committee on the affairs of cities, to which was referred the bill entitled "An act to legalize certain proceedings of the common council of the city of Buffalo," reported in favor of the passage of the same, with amendments, and said bill was committed to the committee of the whole.

The President presented the Second Annual Report of the Managers of the New York State Inebriate Asylum; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 18.)

Mr. Woodin presented the Report of the State Assessors for the year 1874; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 20.)

By unanimous consent, Mr. Tobey asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act in relation to the deposits required to be made, and the taxes, fines, fees, and other charges payable by insurance companies of sister States,' passed May 11, 1865," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on insurance.

Pursuant to previous notice, Mr. McGowan introduced a bill entitled "An act to incorporate the Richfield Union Agricultural Society," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on agriculture.

Mr. Woodin offered the following:

Resolved (if the Assembly concur), That 5,000 extra copies of the report of the State Assessors be printed for distribution among the supervisors and assessors of the various towns, cities, and villages of the State; said copies shall be distributed by the Secretary of State, so that each supervisor and assessor aforesaid shall receive one copy of said report.

Resolved (if the Assembly concur), That 2,000 extra copies be printed for the use of the Legislature, and 1,000 extra copies for the use of the State Assessors.

Ordered, That said resolutions be laid upon the table.

Mr. King offered the following:

Whereas, By chapter 416 of the Laws of Congress, Second Session, 1872, the Secretary of War is directed to cause examinations or surveys, or both, to be made at certain places, and, among others, as to the channel between Staten Island and New Jersey; and,

Whereas, In pursuance of such survey, by chapter 457 of the Laws of Congress, First Session, 1874, the sum of fifty thousand dollars for the opening and improving of the channel between Staten Island and New Jersey was appropriated; and,

Whereas, In pursuance of such appropriation, the United States Engineer in charge of said work has adopted a plan of operations, which is detrimental to the shores and commercial interests of the State of New York; and,

Whereas, Such plan contemplates and will result in the destruction of the Kill von Kull, as it now is, and will divert the same from the State of New York to a distant point, and into the State of New Jersey, said channel to be held there by a dyke; and,

Whereas, The effect of said dyke will be to shoal the waters on the Staten Island shore, thereby seriously injuring the commerce of the said island, and breaking up the plantations of oysters, in the care and cultivation of which a very large capital is invested and the people are almost exclusively engaged; and,

Whereas, The further effect of said dyke will be to detach a portion of the State of New Jersey, viz., Shooters' Island, and place the same south of the proposed artificial channel and upon the New York side, thereby destroying the natural boundary line between the said States, which boundary line is determined by the center of the channel of said Kill von Kull; therefore,

Resolved (if the Assembly concur), That we do earnestly protest against the projected mode of improvement of the Kill von Kull for the reason that it is not imperatively necessary, inasmuch as, according to the engineer's report, an equal depth of water of sixteen feet, at less than. one-half the cost, may be had by dredging the channel as it now is, although possibly the improvement might not be so permanent. That it is in violation of the established boundary lines between the said States, destructive to the commercial interests of Staten Island, and ruinous to the lucrative pursuits of a large majority of the inhabitants. Resolved (if the Assembly concur), That the Senators and Representatives from the State of New York in the Congress of the United States, are respectfully requested to obtain a modification of the plan of said improvement, whereby the objections, as herein stated, may be obviated; and in case that no such change of plan can be effected, then that our representatives are further requested to oppose, at every step, and to vote against any future appropriation which will be needed to carry on the said work.

Resolved (if the Assembly concur), That a copy of this preamble and resolutions be sent to each Senator and Representative from this State in the Congress of the United States.

Mr. King moved that said resolutions be referred to the committee on commerce and navigation, and that the same, with accompanying diagram, be printed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

On motion of Mr. Bradley, and by unanimous consent, the rules were suspended, and the committee on the judiciary was discharged from the further consideration of the Assembly bill entitled "An act to extend the time for the collection of taxes in the city of Elmira," and the same ordered to a third reading.

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