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FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 1875.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Prayer by the Chaplain.

The journal of yesterday was read and approved.

The Senate proceeded to the consideration of the special order, being the resolution of Mr. Johnson amended as follows:

Resolved, That we, the representatives of the people of the State of New York, in Senate assembled, while affirming our unshaken confidence in the patriotism, fidelity, and integrity of Lieutenant-General Philip H. Sheridan, we nevertheless hereby condemn the sentiments of the telegraphic dispatch of General Sheridan, dated at New Orleans, La., January 5, 1875, to the Secretary of War, which suggests that Congress should pass a law declaring a large class of the people of Louisiana "banditti," in order that "they could be tried by a military commission;" and which also suggests "it is possible that, if the President would issue a proclamation declaring these same citizens banditti, no further action need be taken, except that which would devolve upon himself;" that we regard the recommendations contained in said dispatch as despotic in their nature, unprecedented in the history of our country, unwarranted by the present situation of affairs in Louisiana, so far as this body is, at this time, advised, and tending to the destruction of representative government and constitutional liberty.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative, as follows:

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When the name of Mr. Parmenter was called, he asked to be excused

from voting.

The President put the question whether the Senate would grant said request, and it was decided in the negative.

Mr. Parmenter subsequently voted in the negative.

The President presented a memorial of the National Board of Trade relative to the liability of corporations; which was read and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Also, a memorial from the same body for a law requiring all persons doing business under a firm-name to register the same with the county clerk of the county in which the principal place of business of such firm

is located; which was read and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Also, a memorial from the same body for a law revising the modes of transportation upon railways; which was read and referred to the committee on railroads.

Messrs. Kellogg and Lowery presented fifteen petitions of citizens of the counties of Madison, Oswego, and Oneida for the repeal of the law of 1874, so as to exempt the New York and Oswego Midland railroad from taxation; which were read and referred to the committee on railroads.

Mr. Kellogg presented a petition of attorneys at law of Madison county for a law requiring at least one general term of the supreme court at Binghamton; which was read and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Mr. Thompson presented a petition of attorneys of Chenango county upon the same subject; which was read and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Mr. Lowery presented a petition of the common council of the city of Utica for the repeal of the law establishing a board of police and fire commissioners of the city of Utica; which was read and referred to the committee on the affairs of cities.

The President announced the appointment of Mr. Laning in the place of Mr. Ganson, deceased, upon the following committees: Judiciary, claims, and commerce and navigation.

The President presented the Eighth Annual Report of the State Board of Charities; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 15.)

Mr. Lord presented the Twenty-sixth Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Western House of Refuge for Juvenile Delinquents; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 14.)

Mr. Lowery presented the Report of the State Lunatic Asylum, at Utica, for the year 1874; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 16.)

The Assembly sent for concurrence a resolution in the words following:

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Resolved (if the Senate concur), That the people of the State of New York, through their representatives in the Legislature, deprecate and condemn the recent interference of the military forces of the United States in the organization of the Legislature of Louisiana as a gross violation of the constitutional rights of that State, and an implied menace to the rights of other States.

"Resolved (if the Senate concur), That we view with alarm the growing tendency of the general government to subordinate the civil to the military power, in total disregard of all constitutional guaranties, and even of the very spirit and essence of republican institutions.

"Resolved (if the Senate concur), That we especially condemn the proposition of Lieutenant-General Sheridan and its approval by the Secretary of War, in the name of the administration, to subject citizens to trial by military commissions in time of peace."

Ordered, That said resolutions be laid upon the table.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Laning asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to empower the judges of the superior court of Buffalo to employ a stenographer,'

passed March 11, 1874," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Parmenter asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act relative to evidence in legal proceedings," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Pursuant to previous notice, Mr. Wood introduced a bill entitled "An act to provide for the organization of savings banks, for their supervision, and for the administration of their affairs," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on banks.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Tobey asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to appoint a reporter of the decisions of the supreme court," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Fox asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to provide for the support and maintenance of prisoners confined upon civil process," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Gross asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to reorganize the local government of the city of New York,' passed April 30, 1873," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the affairs of cities. By unanimous consent, Mr. Middleton asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to change the name of the Black River Insurance Company of Watertown, New York," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on insurance.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Cole asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to regulate the size of apple, pear, and potato barrels,' passed May 12, 1862," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on agriculture.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Laning asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act in relation to the powers and jurisdiction of the superior court of Buffalo, and of the judges thereof," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Woodin asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend chapter 315, Laws of 1873, entitled 'An act to amend the Revised Statutes in relation to laying out public roads and the alteration thereof,' passed April 28, 1873," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on roads and bridges.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Woodin asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to provide for the incorporation of religious societies,' passed April 5, 1813, and supplementary thereto," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Pursuant to previous notice, Mr. Woodin offered the following: Resolved, That Rule No. 48 of the Rules and Orders of the Senate be and the same is hereby amended so as to read as follows:

"RULE 48. The Senate shall go into consideration of executive business on the first and third Wednesdays of every month that it is in session, at twelve o'clock, at noon, thereof. Any nomination sent by the Governor for the appointment of any officer (except a notary public), shall be referred to that standing committee of the Senate to which the duties of such officer appertain; and no nomination shall be further considered by the Senate, until after the report thereon of a majority of the standing committee to which it was referred; and the consent of the Senate to the appointment of any officer nominated by the Governor, given on any day of the transaction of executive business, shall not be transmitted to the Governor until the next day thereafter for the transaction of such business. Nominations of persons for the office of notary public shall be referred to the Senator from the district in which the nominee resides, except that when the nominee resides in the city and county of New York, the reference shall be to the Senators from that city and county; and when the nominee resides in the county of Kings, the reference shall be to the Senators from that county."

Mr. Gross moved that said resolution be amended as follows:

After the word "referred," insert the words " but the committee to whom any nomination is referred shall report thereon at the next succeeding executive session."

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the negative, as follows:

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The President then put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative, as follows:

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Mr. Woodin offered the following:

Resolved (if the Assembly concur), That on Wednesday, January 20th,

at twelve o'clock, M., the Senate and Assembly will meet in joint assem

bly, in the Assembly chamber, to compare nominations for the office of United States Senator in place of Hon. Reuben E. Fenton, whose term of office will expire on the fourth day of March next.

On motion of Mr. Woodin, and by unanimous consent, the rules were suspended in order that said resolution might be considered immediately. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

On motion of Mr. Woodin, and by unanimous consent, the rules were suspended, and the Clerk ordered to deliver said resolution to the Assembly immediately, and request their concurrence therein.

Mr. Fox moved that the Senate go into executive session to-day immediately upon the disposing of the present order of business.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Bradley offered the following:

Resolved, That on Tuesday, January 19th, at twelve o'clock, M., the Senate will proceed to vote for a Senator in Congress in place of Hon. Reuben E. Fenton, whose term of office will expire on the 4th day of March next. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Johnson moved that when the Senate adjourn to-day it adjourn to meet on Monday evening next at half-past seven o'clock.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

On motion of Mr. Johnson, the Senate then went into executive session; and, after some time spent therein, the doors were opened and legislative business resumed.

The Senate then resolved itself into a committee of the whole, and proceeded to the consideration of general orders, being the bill entitled as follows:

"An act to confirm and legalize the proceedings of a special town meeting, held in and for the town of Gallatin, in the county of Columbia, and State of New York, on the 5th day of November, 1874, and to authorize and empower the board of town auditors of said town of Gallatin, in pursuance of the vote and decision of said special town meeting, to issue bonds of said town in lieu of bonds issued by commissioners appointed for said town by the county judge of said county, in aid of the Rhinebeck and Connecticut Railroad Company, and accrued interest and expenses to the amount of twenty-seven thousand dollars, and to transfer and deliver to one Thomas Cornell all shares of stock of said railroad company, four hundred and fifty shares, issued and delivered to said town, upon receiving from said Cornell, in consideration of said four hundred and fifty shares of said stock, said bonds of said town to the amount of twenty thousand dollars and accrued interest."

After some time spent therein the President resumed the chair, and Mr. Robertson, from said committee, reported progress on said named bill, and asked and obtained leave to sit again.

Mr. Ray moved that the committee of the whole be discharged from the further consideration of said bill, and that the same be referred to the committee on the judiciary.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

On motion of Mr. Gross, the Senate adjourned.

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