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at Ward's Island will increase to about 2,000, and in the counties to more than 1,200. On the first of January next the commissioners will practically be without funds to care for these persons. The expenses of the Ward's Island and Castle Garden institutions will, during the months of January and February, be about $25,000 per month, while the receipts will not exceed $5,000 per month..

COMMON SCHOOLS.

The statistics of the common schools for the year ending September, 30, 1874, are as follows:

Total receipts, including balance on hand Sep

tember 30, 1873..

Total expenditures...

Amount paid for teachers' wages.

Amount paid for school-houses, repairs, furniture, etc. ...

Estimated value of school-houses and sites

Total number of school-houses..

Number of school districts, exclusive of cities

$11, 944, 023 38

10, 779, 779 61 7,559, 090 59

Number of teachers employed at the same time for the full legal term of school

$1,721, 282.64

28, 714, 738 00

11, 775

11, 299

18, 554

29, 683

1,039, 097

6,568

138, 610

835, 882

1, 501, 874

Number of teachers employed during any portion

of the year....

Number of children attending public schools..
Number of persons attending normal schools.
Number of children of school age in private schools..
Number of volumes in school district libraries..
Number of persons in the State between 5 and 21
years of age

COLLEGES AND ACADEMIES.

The condition of the colleges and academies, subject to the visitation of the Regents of the University, is very satisfactory.

There are within the State, 22 literary colleges, 10 medical colleges, and 240 academies and academical departments of union schools. With several of the colleges included in this enumeration, are connected special schools of law, of medicine, and of other branches of science. By the wise liberality of individual citizens, the endowments and appliances of several of these institutions have, during the last year, been largely increased, and their means of usefulness greatly extended. The number of scholars in attendance upon the academies has increased, and the standard of scholarship has, upon the whole, considerably advanced. These institutions, while they prepare students for admission to the colleges, are also designed to fit another class for immediate entrance upon the practical duties of life, and, thus complementing the work of the common schools, form an important part of the educational institutions of the State.

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STATE LIBRARY AND MUSEUM.

The State Library, in both its departments, has been enlarged by the application of all the means at the disposal of the Trustees. In the extent and value of its contents, it is a source of just pride to the people of the State. The law library numbers about 26,000 volumes, and the general library about 68,000, including many rare and valuable works.

The State Museum of Natural History, under the management of its able curator, Prof. Hall, is reported to be in excellent condition, and exhibits the productions of the State, in a manner to afford to the student of natural science most valuable aid in his studies.

THE NATIONAL GUARD.

The National Guard consists of eight divisions, containing nineteen brigades, composed of one regiment and nine separate troops of cavalry, one battalion and ten batteries of artillery, thirty regiments and thirteen battalions of infantry. Total officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates (three brigades estimated), twenty thousand five hundred and thirty-two (20,532).

SOLDIERS OF WAR OF 1812.

The last Legislature made an additional appropriation of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000), for redeeming certain certificates issued to soldiers of the war of 1812.

The former appropriation paid on the certificates allowed $91.52 on $100 of principal.

The appropriation of 1874 paid the balance due on the principal, and $46.72 on $100 of interest.

WAR CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES.

On the 1st day of January, 1874, the unsettled balance in favor of the State was $1,209,286.11. Since that time another installment of over $34,000 has been presented to the Treasury Department. In the unsettled balance above stated is included a claim for $131,188.02, interest on Comptroller's bonds, which cannot be paid without legislative action.

SALT SPRINGS.

The quantity of salt from the Onondaga Salt Springs, inspected during the last fiscal year, was 6,594, 191 bushels, less by 1,364,981 bushels than the production of the preceding year. The net revenue from this source was $10,341.67, showing a falling off, as compared with the preceding year, of $11,424.08.

STATE PRISONS.

The following statement shows the expenditures and earnings of each of the prisons, for the year ending September 30, 1874:

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In 1867, the excess of advances from the Treasury

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The number of convicts in each of the prisons, September 30, 1874, was as follows:

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Ordered, That said message be laid upon the table and printed. The Assembly sent for concurrence a resolution in the words following:

"Resolved (if the Senate concur), That when this Legislature adjourns on Wednesday, January 6th, it be to meet on Tuesday, January 12th, at eleven o'clock, a. M.

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On motion of Mr. Woodin, and by unanimous consent, the rules were suspended, in order that said resolution might be considered immediately.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

On motion of Mr. Woodin, and by unanimous consent, the rules were suspended, and the Clerk ordered to return said resolution to the Assembly immediately, with a message informing that the Senate have concurred in the passage of the same.

On motion of Mr. Fox, the Senate adjourned.

* Miscellaneous expenditures, not distributed, including $26,231.25 for transportation of convicts.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6, 1875.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

No clergyman present.

The journal of yesterday was read and approved.

Mr. Kellogg presented a petition of citizens of Madison county for a reduction of tolls on the canals; which was read and referred to the committee on canals.

Mr. Dickinson presented a petition of St. Regis Indians to have their rights restored; which was read and referred to the committee on Indian affairs.

Mr. Selkreg presented a petition of members of the bar of Broome county in relation to the supreme court library, at Binghamton; which was read and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

The President announced the following appointment:
President's Clerk-J. Stanley Brown.

The President presented a statement of the pardons, commutations, and reprieves granted by the Governor during the year 1874; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 9.)

Also, the report of the Commissioners to revise the statutes; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 8.)

Also, the Annual Report of the New Capitol Commissioners; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 6.)

By unanimous consent, Mr. King asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to extend the operation and effect of the act passed February 17, 1848, entitled 'An act to authorize the formation of corporations for manufacturing, mining, mechanical or chemical purposes, " which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on manufac

tures.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Bradley asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to authorize the surrogate of Steuben county to grant to Benjamin F. Young, of Bath, in that county, letters of administration with the will annexed of the goods, chattels, and credits of Richard T. Pulteney, deceased, upon filing with such surrogate a bond in the penal sum of one hundred thousand dollars," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Thompson asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to repeal 'An act to subject the real and personal property of the New York and Oswego Midland railroad to taxation, and to appropriate the amount of the county taxes thereon to certain towns, to be applied toward the payment of the interest or principal of certain town bonds,' passed April 29, 1874, and to suspend the collection of taxes assessed under the same," which was read the first

time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on railroads.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Lowery asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to further enlarge the powers of boards of supervisors," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on internal affairs.

Mr. D. P. Wood offered the following:

Resolved, That the following persons be and are hereby designated to serve as pages of the Senate for the present session, or during good behavior: James O'Neil, James T. Gaffany, William Goodwin, David Connolly, Irving T. Porter, George T. Connor, John Donahue, George Gunther.

Mr. Johnson moved to amend said resolution by striking out all after the word "Resolved," and inserting the following: "That the persons to serve as pages during the present session shall be designated by the President of the Senate."

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the negative, as follows:

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The President then put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative, as follows:

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Mr. Lowery moved to take from the table the resolution in the words following:

"Resolved, That Rev. Dr. Ebenezer Halley be elected Chaplain of the Senate for the ensuing session of the Legislature, and that his compensation be the same as that of last year."

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

The President then put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

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