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"An act to repeal sections 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 15, and the preamble of chapter 864 of the Laws of 1868, entitled 'An act to authorize the drainage of marsh lands,' passed June 9, 1868; also chapter 282 of the Laws of 1869, entitled 'An act to amend an act entitled An act to authorize the drainage of marsh lands,' passed April 22, 1869, and for the repayment to said marsh-land company of moneys paid by them into the treasury of the State, in pursuance of said chapter 864 of the Laws of 1868."

"An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to incorporate the Sisterhood of Grey Nuns in the State of New York,' passed April 6, 1871." Assembly, "An act to provide payment for the services of certain officers and employees of the Assembly."

After some time spent therein the President resumed the chair, and Mr. Johnson, from said committee, reported in favor of the passage of the first and second named bills, which report was agreed to, and said bills ordered engrossed for a third reading.

Mr. Johnson, from the same committee, reported in favor of the passage of the last named bill, with amendments, which report was agreed to, and said bill ordered to a third reading.

On motion of Mr. Johnson, the Senate adjourned.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1875.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Prayer by the Chaplain.

The journal of yesterday was read and approved.

The President presented a resolution of the Chamber of Commerce of the State of New York relative to the canals; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 41.)

Mr. Parmenter presented a remonstrance from the board of trustees of the village of Greenbush against the continuance of the charter of the Greenbush Horse Railroad Company; which was read and referred to the committee on railroads.

Mr. Thompson, from the committee on internal affairs, to which was referred the bill entitled "An act to fix the compensation of overseers of the poor," reported in favor of the passage of the same, and said bill was committed to the committee of the whole.

Mr. Wood, from the committee on engrossed bills, reported as correctly engrossed the bills entitled as follows:

"An act to legalize and confirm the official acts of William Burr, a justice of the peace, of the town of Lindley, in the county of Steuben, and to enable him to take and file his oath of office."

"An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to incorporate the Sisterhood of Gray Nuns in the State of New York,' passed April 6, 1871." "An act to repeal sections 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 15, and the preamble of chapter 864 of the Laws of 1868, entitled 'An act to authorize the drainage of marsh lands,' passed June 9, 1868; also chapter 282 of the Laws of 1869, entitled 'An act to amend an act entitled An act to

authorize the drainage of marsh lands,' passed April 22, 1869, and for the repayment to said marsh-land company of moneys paid by them into the treasury of the State, in pursuance of said chapter 864 of the Laws of 1868."

"An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to provide for the incorporation of religious societies,' passed April 5, 1813, and supplementary thereto."

The bill entitled "An act to legalize and confirm the official acts of William Burr, a justice of the peace, of the town of Lindley, in the county of Steuben, and to enable him to take and file his oath of office," was read a third time.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the final passage of said bill, and it was decided in the affirmative, a majority of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, and three-fifths being present, as follows:

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Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said bill to the Assembly, and request their concurrence therein.

The bill entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to incorporate the Sisterhood of Gray Nuns in the State of New York,' passed April 6, 1871," was read a third time.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the final passage of said bill, and it was decided in the affirmative, a majority of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, as follows:

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Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said bill to the Assembly, and request their concurrence therein.

The bill entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to provide for the incorporation of religious societies,' passed April 5, 1813, and supplementary thereto," having been announced for a third reading,

On motion of Mr. Robertson, and by unanimous consent, the title of said bill was amended by striking out, in section 1, the words "chapter sixty of the Laws of eighteen hundred and thirteen is hereby amended as follows."

Also amend the title by striking out the words " and supplementary thereto."

Said bill was then read a third time.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the final passage of said bill, and it was decided in the affirmative, a majority of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, and three-fifths being present, as follows:

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Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said bill to the Assembly, and request their concurrence therein.

The bill entitled "An act to repeal sections 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 15, and the preamble of chapter 864 of the Laws of 1868, entitled 'An act to authorize the drainage of marsh lands,' passed June 9, 1868; also chapter 282 of the Laws of 1869, entitled 'An act to amend an act entitled An act to authorize the drainage of marsh lands,' passed April 22, 1869, and for the repayment to said marsh-land company of moneys paid by them into the treasury of the State, in pursuance of said chapter 864 of the Laws of 1868," was read a third time.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the final passage of said bill, and it was decided in the affirmative twothirds of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, as follows.

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Mr. Jacobs moved that the vote by which said bill was passed be reconsidered, and that said motion be laid upon the table.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion to lay upon the table, and it was decided in the affirmative. The Assembly bill entitled "An act to provide payment for the services of certain officers and employees of the Assembly," having been announced for a third reading,

Mr. Johnson moved that said bill be referred to the committee on the judiciary.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Laning asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to permit companies or corporations incorporated or formed under or pursuant to the provisions of the act entitled An act for the incorporation of companies formed to navigate the lakes and rivers,' passed April 15, 1854, to extend the term of their corporate

existence," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on commerce and navigation.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Madden asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend the act relating to the assessment of real property in the several towns and wards of this State," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on internal affairs.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Middleton asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to provide for the incorporation of fire insurance companies,' passed June 25, 1853," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on insurance. Mr. Jacobs moved to take from the table the motion to reconsider the vote by which the bill entitled "An act to repeal sections 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 15, and the preamble of chapter 864 of the Laws of 1868, entitled 'An act to authorize the drainage of marsh lands,' passed June 9, 1868; also chapter 282 of the Laws of 1869, entitled 'An act to amend an act entitled An act to authorize the drainage of marsh lands,' passed April 22, 1869, and for the repayment to said marsh-land company of moneys paid by them into the treasury of the State, in pursuance of said chapter 864 of the Laws of 1868," was passed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion to take from the table, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Jacobs then withdrew his motion to reconsider the vote.

Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said bill to the Assembly, and request their concurrence therein.

Mr. Robertson moved that the President be empowered to declare a recess of the Senate upon the conclusion of the proceedings attending the reception of Mr. Bryant.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

The Senate then resolved itself into a committee of the whole, and proceeded to the consideration of general orders, being the bills entitled as follows:

"An act to establish specie payments on all contracts or obligations payable in this State in dollars, and made after January 1, 1879."

Assembly, "An act to authorize the city of Newburgh to borrow moneys and issue bonds therefor in payment of improvements made in the water-works of said city, and to issue other bonds hereafter to pay water bonds heretofore issued."

After some time spent therein the President resumed the chair, and Mr. Jacobs, from said committee, reported progress on the first named bill, and asked and obtained leave to sit again.

Mr. Jacobs, from the same committee, reported in favor of the passage of the last named bill, which report was agreed to, and said bill ordered to a third reading.

The Senate again resolved itself into a committee of the whole, and proceeded to the consideration of general orders, being the bills entitled as follows:

"An act to enable the Charity Foundation of the Protestant Episcopal Church, in the city of Buffalo, to sell and convey certain lands."

"An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to incorporate the city of Binghamton,' passed April 9, 1867, and the several acts amending the same.'

After some time spent therein the President resumed the chair, and Mr. Johnson, from said committee, reported in favor of the passage of said named bills, which report was agreed to, and said bills ordered engrossed for a third reading.

The hour of twelve o'clock having arrived, pursuant to resolution, Mr. Robertson, from the committee appointed for that purpose, introduced William Cullen Bryant, Esq., as follows:

Mr. PRESIDENT-I have the honor to present to you the most eminent citizen of our State-I might say of our country - Mr. William Cullen Bryant.

The President arose and spoke as follows:

SENATORS - You have sought for this opportunity to pay a signal tribute of respect to one of your fellow-citizens. Honors like this have hitherto been reserved for those who have risen to eminence in the public service; nor do I recall an instance, in the history of any State where our language is spoken, where they have been conferred upon a man of letters. But henceforth it will be known that New York, recognizing that States are governed not by statutes alone, and still less by the sword, gives her highest honors to the poet as well as to the law-giver and the soldier.

I need not recall to you the career of your guest. Every American knows the incidents of that long and honorable life. Still less need I impress upon you the merits of his writings. You all remember the glowing words with which, in his youth, he taught "the love of nature" and the Christian's faith. You have all seen him, seated among the lengthening shadows of the evening, and heard him repeat, in English as pure as the English of Addison and Goldsmith, Homer's undying song.

I know that I utter your heartfelt wishes, when I express the hope that the blessings which have been so abundantly given to him may be continued, and that his life may still be spared to the country whose institutions he has defended, whose liberties he has widened, and whose glories he has increased.

Senators, I present to you William Cullen Bryant.
Mr. Bryant responded as follows:

Mr. DORSHEIMER AND GENTLEMEN OF THE SENATE You will pardon me if, on rising to say a few words in acknowledgment of the honor done me, I find myself somewhat embarrassed, which you will, I have no doubt, excuse on account of the novelty of the occasion. There is an old story, a story some two thousand years old, recorded in Greek, I believe (for the Greek literature has its jest books as well as the English), in which it is related that a man lost his little child and made a funeral. A considerable concourse came together of his friends and acquaintances, and, as he appeared before them, he made an apology for the smallness of the infant that was brought out, lamenting that he had nothing to show them for the purposes of burial, for the solemnities of the occasion, except the corpse of that little child.

I find myself in a similar condition. I see before me the representatives of different portions of our great, powerful, and populous State. see men who come from our broad, fertile plains; from rich and beautiful valleys; from the grand and picturesque mountain regions of the north of the State; from the banks of our glorious rivers; from the borders of our immense lakes; from populous towns and pleasant villages; towns that are the seats of trade and industry; cities noisy with the bustle of

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