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Mr. Bradley moved to amend said resolution by striking out "1,000," and inserting in lieu thereof "500."

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

The President then put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, as amended, and it was decided in the affirmative, as follows:

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Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said resolution to the Assembly, and request their concurrence therein.

Mr. Wood, from the committee on engrossed bills, reported as correctly engrossed the bills entitled as follows:

"An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to convey to creditors a just division of the estates of debtors who convey to assignees for the benefit of creditors,' passed April 13, 1860, and the acts amendatory thereof.'"

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"An act to amend chapter 365 of the Laws of 1862, entitled 'An act to authorize the discharge of mortgages of record in certain cases. "An act to reduce the term of imprisonment of convicts in the several penitentiaries of this State."

Mr. Wood, from the committee on finance, to which was referred the Assembly bill entitled "An act to provide for the deficiency in the appropriation for the salaries of certain officers of the government," reported in favor of the passage of the same, and said bill was committed to the committee of the whole.

On motion of Mr. Wood, and by unanimous consent, the rules were suspended, the committee of the whole were discharged from the consideration of said bill, and the same was read a third time.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to to the final passage of said bill, and it was decided in the affirmative, a majority of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, and three-fifths being present, as follows:

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On motion of Mr. Wood, and by unanimous consent, the rules were suspended, and the Clerk ordered to return said bill to the Assembly immediately, with a message informing that the Senate have concurred in the passage of the same.

Mr. Thompson, from the committee on internal affairs, to which was referred the Assembly bill entitled "An act authorizing the board of supervisors of the county of Albany to issue bonds to pay a portion of the bonds of said county, that will mature during the year 1875," reported in favor of the passage of the same, with amendments, and said bill was committed to the committee of the whole.

Mr. Dayton moved that the committee of the whole be discharged from the further consideration of said bill, and that the same be ordered to a third reading.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Said bill having been announced for a third reading,

On motion of Mr. Dayton, and by unanimous consent, was amended as follows:

Section 1, line 4, engrossed bill, strike out the words "Thursday, December third," and insert in lieu thereof the words "Wednesday, January twenty-seventh."

Same section, line 5, strike out the word "four," and insert in lieu thereof the word "five."

Same section, line 31, strike out the word "second," and insert in lieu thereof the word "seventeenth."

Same section, line 68, strike out all after the word "weeks," down to and including the word "papers," in line 69, and insert in lieu thereof the following: "in the papers designated by resolution of said board of supervisors."

Said bill was then read a third time.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the final passage of said bill, and it was decided in the affirmative, a majority of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, and three-fifths being present, as follows:

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.

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On motion of Mr. Dayton, and by unanimous consent, the rules were suspended, and the Clerk ordered to return said bill to the Assembly! immediately, with a message informing that the Senate have concurred in the passage of the same, with amendments.

The Assembly returned the following resolution, with a message that they had concurred in the passage of the same :

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That 2,500 copies of the Governor's Message in paper covers, and 250 copies bound in cloth be printed for the use of the Executive Department.

The Assembly sent for concurrence a resolution in the words fol lowing:

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That 1,000 extra copies, with covers, of the Report of the Willard Asylum be printed for the use of the officers: of the asylum.

Ordered, That said resolution be laid upon the table.

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The Assembly sent for concurrence a resolution in the words following:

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That 2,000 extra copies of the Fourth Annual Report of the Trustees of the, New York State Homœopathic Asylum for the Insane be printed; 1,000 copies for the use of the trustees, and 1,000 copies for the use of the members of the Legislature. Ordered, That said resolution be laid upon the table.

Mr. Booth presented the Fifth Annual Report of the Trustees of the Lenox Library; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed. (See Doc. No. 34.)

Mr. Jacobs presented the Annual Report of the President of the Inebriates' Home for Kings county for the year 1874; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 35.)

By unanimous consent, Mr. Lord asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend chapter 605 of the Laws of 1874, entitled 'An act to authorize the Canal Commissioners to build a road or street bridge over the Erie canal on Goodman street, at the east boundary line of the city of Rochester,' passed June 5, 1874," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on canals.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Johnson asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to establish specie payments on all contracts or obligations payable in this State in dollars, and made after January 1, 1879," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on finance.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Moore asked and obtained leave to intro duce a bill entitled "An act in relation to laying out, constructing and operating a rapid transit road in the city of New York," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on railroads.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Ray asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act for the incorporation of companies formed to navigate the lakes and rivers,' passed April 15, 1854," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on commerce and navigation.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Thompson presented three remonstrances of citizens of the town of Smyrna against the bill exempting the New York and Oswego Midland Railroad from taxation; which were read and referred to the committee of the whole.

The Assembly returned the following entitled bill, with a message that they had concurred in the passage of the same:

"An act to authorize the surrogate of Steuben county to grant to Benjamin F. Young, of Bath, in that county, letters of administration, with the will annexed, of the goods, chattels and credits of Richard T. Pulteney, deceased, upon filing with such surrogate a bond in the penal sum of one hundred thousand dollars."

Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said bill to the Governor.

The bill entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to convey to creditors a just division of the estates of debtors who convey to assignees for the benefit of creditors,' passed April 13, 1860, and the acts amendatory thereof," was read a third time.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the final passage of said bill, and it was decided in the affirmative, a majority of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, as follows:

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Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said bill to the Assembly, and request their concurrence therein.

The bill entitled "An act to amend chapter 365 of the Laws of 1862, entitled 'An act to authorize the discharge of mortgages of record in certain cases, ," was read a third time.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the final passage of said bill, and it was decided in the affirmative, a majority of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, as follows:

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Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said bill to the Assembly, and request their concurrence therein.

The bill entitled "An act to amend the Code of Procedure," was read a third time.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the final passage of said bill, and it was decided in the affirmative, a majority of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, as follows:

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Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said bill to the Assembly, and request their concurrence theirein.

Mr. Robertson moved that the bill entitled "An act relating to the court of arbitration of the Chamber of Commerce of the State of New York, and to provide for the expenses thereof, and for appeals therefrom," be printed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. McGowan offered the following:

Resolved, That the committee on insurance be discharged from the further consideration of the Senate bill entitled "An act to change the name of the Farm Buildings Insurance Company," and that the same be committed to the committee on the judiciary,

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Johnson moved that when the Senate adjourn to-day, it adjourn to meet on Monday evening next at half-past seven o'clock.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Wood rose and spoke as follows:

During the brief period of time extending between the last and the present session of this Senate, one of its members, the Hon. John Ganson, whose vigorous and manly form and noble and endearing qualities of head and heart we all remember, passed quickly, silently, and without premonition, into the dark valley which separates the living from the dead, and to-day he sits in a higher assemblage, relieved from the cares, trials, anxieties, and vexations of this transitory life.

It is eminently fitting and proper that the members of this body should, through the pages of its journal, transmit to posterity a memorial of their appreciation of the character and services of so worthy and distinguished an associate.

With this view, I ask leave to present to the Senate for its consideration the following:

Whereas, since the adjournment of the Legislature in April, 1874, the Hon. John Ganson, a representative of the Thirty-first Senatorial district, was, with terrible suddenness, taken from life;

Resolved, That this Senate do now make public and enduring record of the memory they bear of his integrity, without a shadow or a stain; of the courtesy and kindness with which he wielded his parliamentary skill; of the judicial ability which he brought to the examination of the greatest questions in affairs; of the strength and value of his statesmanship; of his manly independence in sentiment; of his truth and honor; and of the qualities which in their assemblage formed for him and won to him the place which he held in the heart and thought of his fellow Senators, illustrated as it was by his professional career, and by his repeated service in the councils of the State and nation.

Resolved, That to manifest the sense of the Senate of the great loss which its councils and the public service has sustained in the death of the late Senator from the Thirty-first district, it is ordered that these, resolutions be entered in the journal of the Senate, and that copies thereof, duly avouched by the Lieutenant-Governor and the Clerk, be transmitted to the family of the deceased, to the mayor of the city of Buffalo, and the chief-justice of the court of appeals.

Mr. King, in seconding the adoption of the resolutions, spoke as follows:

Mr. PRESIDENT I would be as untrue to my own feelings as to the memory of Mr. Ganson, were I to remain silent. Strangers to each other when first we met in this chamber, we were soon brought into constant intimacy by being associated upon several committees. The same university had been our alma mater, and nearly at the same period, thus revealing many friendships, which were nurtured, and which bonded us together more strongly than could have been by any mere political affinity; for in politics we had some difference, but never to cloud a frank and pleasant intercourse. In open Senate, as well as in committee, I learned to appreciate and to benefit by his experience and knowledge in the law, and as a law-maker.

He had served before with marked distinction, both here and in the

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