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mean low-water of 73 feet; at Coeyman's, 8 feet; at Mull's, 9 feet; at Castleton, 8 feet; at Cedar Hill, 7 feet; at Winnies, 9.4 feet; on the Overslaugh, 7.7 feet; at Cuyler's Bar, 9 feet; at Round Shoal, 7.2 feet. That is, at low-water 7 feet could be carried from New Baltimore to Albany, and from Albany to Troy 7.2 feet. The channels, however, were very crooked in places, very narrow, and of such difficult navigation that the grounding of boats was, it might almost be said, the rule and not the exception.

The orignally adopted project for the improvement was the construction of longitudinal dikes generally of the height of mean high-water, to direct the currents and allow the flow over their tops of freshets and of ice.

The amount expended to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1881, was $900,159.16.

The condition of the improvement at that period was a navigable depth from New Baltimore to Albany at mean low-water of 9 feet, and from Albany to Troy of 8 feet.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, was $5,353.04; the work undertaken was not completed, and the effects not noted.

The amounts that can be profitably expended during the year ending June 30, 1882, are the available balance, $48,775.80, for work already under contract, and for necessary repairs. The additional cost of improving the channel north of and adjoining New Baltimore will be about $30,000.

The estimated amount required for the entire and permanent completion of the work of improvement in accordance with the approved and adopted project is $30,000, and by the revised estimate $78,000, less amount appropriated by act of August 2, 1882.

July 1, 1881, amount available..........

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of

$54,217 87

outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881..

July 1, 1882, outstanding liabilities...

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Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884. (See Appendix D 1.)

68,000 00

68,000 00

2. Rondout Harbor, New York.-The original condition of the navigable channel gave a depth of about 7 feet at mean low-water.

The originally adopted project was the prolongation of the channel. of Rondout Creek into the Hudson River by the construction of two parallel dikes; also of a branch dike to direct the current of the river and to protect the north dike from the floating ice, and there has been no modification of the original project.

The amount expended to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1881, was $88,638.81; and the depth in the channel was 133 feet at mean low-water.

There has been expended during the year ending June 30, 1882, for incidental purposes only the sum of $92.50.

The amount that can be expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1883, is the available balance, $2,268.69, in repairs of dikes and re

placing spring piles, and, if additional appropriations be made, in the endeavor further to enlarge the opening between the extremities of the dikes.

The estimated amount required for the entire and permanent comple. tion of the work of improvement in accordance with the approved and adopted project ($1,000 to $2,000) to be used in widening the outlet between the dikes was appropriated by act of August 2, 1882.

July 1, 1881. amount available....

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities, July 1, 1881..

July 1, 1882, amount available...

Amount appropriated by act passed August 2, 1882.

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883.. (See Appendix D 2.)

$2,361 19

92 50

2,268 69

2,000 00

4,268 69

3. Removing obstructions in East River and Hell Gate, New York.-The original condition of the channel of East River and Hell Gate was the existence of many large and dangerous rocky obstructions to navigation. The depth over Diamond Reef at mean low-water was 174 feet; over Coenties Reef, 14.3 feet; over Frying Pan, 11 feet; over Pot Rock, 20 feet; over Heel Tap, 12.1 feet; over reef at the North Brother, 16 feet. Hallet's Point from the shore at Astoria projected under water 325 feet to the contour line of 26 feet at mean low-water, and embraced an area of about 3 acres. The Middle Reef, with an area of about 9 acres, lay in the middle of the channels at Hell Gate, having a small backbone projecting above high-water, and caught vessels swept upon it by the ebb currents, which passed directly over the rock. Hallet's Point and the Middle Reef may be said to have been alternate in mischievous functions; vessels which escaped one ran a great risk of falling upon the other.

What added considerably to the danger from these reefs was the bend at right angles of the river at the spot.

The originally adopted project for the improvement was the least extensive of three projects discussed by the engineer in charge. That one now being carried out was judged by the authorities in 1867 to be too expensive and costly. The project first adopted was the removal of Pot Rock, Frying Pan, Way's Reef, Shell Drake, the rock off Negro Point, the rocks near Woolsey's bath-house, Blackwell's Rock, portions of Hallet's Point and of Scaly Rock. Sea-walls were designed for the Middle Reef, Hog's Back, the Bread and Cheese, and a beacon for Rylander's Reef.

The project most favored by the engineer in charge, which included likewise the total removal of Hallet's Point and of the Middle Reef, has, as time passed, received the approval of the authorities.

The project first intended solely for Hell Gate has also been modified by incorporating with it rocky obstructions in the East River, Diamond Reef, Coenties Reef, and a reef near the North Brothers.

The amount expended thereon to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1881, was $2,616,262.04.

The condition of the improvement was the removal of Diamond, Coenties, Way's Reef, and Shell Drake to the depth of 26 feet at mean lowwater, the breaking up of Heel Tap Rock, the tunneling and explosion of Hallet's Point, and the removal of the débris to the depth of 26 feet at mean low-water over two-thirds of its area, the tunneling of the Middle Reef (Flood Rock) to the extent of 13,523.08 linear feet, and the

removal therefrom of 39,608.38 cubic yards of stone measured in placethe removal of a small portion of the rock that had been blasted from the reef at North Brother Island. The Bread and Cheese, a dangerous reef, had been inclosed and embanked by the commissioners of charities and correction of New York City.

The amount expended during the year ending June 30, 1882, was $312,326.31.

Hallet's Point has been brought to a depth of 26 feet at mean lowwater, the reef off the North Brother removed to 26 feet at mean lowwater, the tunnels at the Middle Reef (Flood Rock) during the year were driven an additional length of 6,453.5 linear feet, with the removal of 21,689.83 cubic yards of stone measured in place.

The amount that can be profitably expended during the year ending June 30, 1883 is the balance available, $25,623.35, and $320,000, if appropriated, which can be expended on Frying Pan, Pot Rock, and Heel Tap Rock, in extending the tunnels and excavations in the Middle Reef (Flood Rock), and in boring for the final blast.

The estimated amount required for the entire and permanent completion of the work of improvement in accordance with the approved and adopted project is $1,965,078.55.

July 1, 1881, amount available...

Amount received from sale of coal to Lieut. G. McC. Derby.
Amount appropriated by act approved May 4, 1882..

$250,518 03 46 50 50,000 00

300, 564 53

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881..

July 1, 1882, outstanding liabilities..

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July 1, 1882, amount available....

Amount appropriated by act passed August 2, 1882............

25,623 35 200, 000 00

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883..

225,623 35

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project........ 1,965, 078 55 Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884 to include the final explosion....

(See Appendix D 3.)

500,000 00

4. Buttermilk Channel, New York.-The channel in its original con. dition was obstructed by a large shoal, with a minimum depth of 93 feet at mean low-water, which lay in the direct track of navigation, too near the wharves of Brooklyn for the safe passage or maneuver of large vessels.

The originally adopted project for the improvement was the removal of a sufficient portion of this shoal to the depth of 26 feet at mean lowwater, and thereby to increase the depth and width of the channel.

The amount expended to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1881, was $25,421.01.

The removal of a part of the shoal at that date gave proportionate relief to vessels going to the Brooklyn wharves.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, was $37,386.28, and greater benefit has been obtained by the increase in width of the deepened channel.

The amount available, $57,192.71, with additional appropriations, may be profitably expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1883.

The estimated amount required for the entire and permanent completion of the work of improvement, in accordance with the approved and

adopted project, is $20,000; but owing to the large and unexpected advances in the cost of dredging since the first estimate was made, it is not unlikely that $30,000 will be required in addition to the appropriation of August 2, 1882.

July 1, 1881, amount available.

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881..

July 1, 1882, outstanding liabilities....

July 1, 1882, amount available....

Amount appropriated by act passed August 2, 1882

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883 ....

$88,978 99

$31,786 28

7,920 00

39,706 28

49, 272 71 60,000 00

109, 272 71

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project........... Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884.. (See Appendix D 4.)

30,000 00 30,000 00

5. Harlem River, New York. The lines of the improvement, as laid down by the engineer in charge, are as follows:

Below the Harlem or Third Avenue Bridge the outer pier and bulkhead lines, as laid down by the Park Department, are adopted. Some rock excavated in the channel will here be necessary, but the cost will be independent of the width between the exterior pier lines.

Above Third Avenue Bridge to the entrance of Dyckman's Cut into the Harlem River, the pier and bulkhead lines are laid down 400 feet apart.

This part of the line will cost the United States nothing, except, it may be to dredge a channel for the through passage of vessels, and the same amount of cost would result whether the distance between the exterior pier lines was 200, 300, 400, or 1,000 feet, the width of the improvement here not entering at all as an element of cost.

The line following Dyckman's Cut, through Dyckman's Meadows, will pass, for a part of the way, through solid rock; and it is here that the principal cost of the undertaking must be encountered. This portion is to be made 350 feet wide. It would have been preferable to establish it at 400 feet, but the additional amount of rock excavation was the obstacle. The remainder of the line to the Hudson River will follow the course of the Spuyten Duyvil, and the width will be 400 feet.

As the difference in the heights and time of tides between the East and North rivers, after the connection is made between the Harlem and Hudson, will be the course of the currents upon which reliance is placed to keep open the channel, it is expedient for the length of the line which the channel has to traverse not to contract the width, and thus add to the resistances encountered in the flow of the water. A width of 400 feet will also give greater room to passing vessels between the rows of vessels tied to the wharves.

July 1, 1881, amount available
July 1, 1882, amount availabe

$400,000 00 400, 000 00

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project........ 1,700, 000 00 (See Appendix D 5.)

6. Flushing Bay, New York. The original condition of the navigable channel was a depth at the shoalest part along the line leading to Flushing of 3.9 feet at mean low-water, and it was not therefore available for

commerce.

The originally adopted project for the improvement was the formation

of a tidal basin by means of dikes, which by its filling and emptying through one channel would keep up a depth of 6 feet at mean low-water, and even more after once having been dredged. No modification has been made in the project.

The amount expended to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1881, was $26,176.78. And at that time about 3,000 feet of diking had been constructed, and a channel 60 feet wide having a depth nearly of 6 feet at mean low-water communicates with the creek at Flushing.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, was $16,562.38, and a channel 100 feet wide and 6 feet deep has been dredged to the dock on the Newtown side of the bay.

The balance available, $2,260.84, could be profitably expended with hired labor in connecting the dredged channel to Flushing with the exterior contour line of 6 feet of depth on the exterior of the bay, and any additional appropriation may be profitably expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1883, if it is intended to complete the project by extending the dike.

The estimated amount required for the entire and permanent completion of the work of improvement in accordance with the approved and adopted project is $123,500, but it is probable that the project may be completed for less.

July 1, 1881, amount available..

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of

outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881.

July 1, 1882, outstanding liabilities..

July 1, 1882, amount available..

Amount appropriated by act passed August 2, 1882.

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883.

$14,291 74

$12,030 90
513

12, 036 03

2,255 71

5,000 00

7,255 71

123,500 00 40,000 00

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884.
(See Appendix D 6.)

7. Gowanus Bay, New York.-The original condition of the channel was inadequate for the navigation of vessels employed in the commerce of this district, the depth of water varying from 6.9 feet to 12.3 feet at mean low-water.

The originally adopted plan was to dredge a channel from the 18-foot contour outside the bay to the drawbridge at Hamilton avenue; the estimated cost was $182,850. It has been recommended by the officer in charge to dredge the existing channel from Hamilton avenue to the southwest corner of Erie Basin, and thence to divide it into two branches, one to the north and one to the south. The cost of this revised project will be $192,564.90.

There were no expenditures up to June 30, 1881. The condition remained unaltered up to that time.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, was $23,834.83, and a channel has been dredged 4,374 feet long, 100 feet wide, and 18 feet deep.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1883, there can be profitably expended the available balance, $16,165.17, together with the additional appropriation.

The estimated amount required for the entire and permanent completion of the improvement, in accordance with the approved and adopted project is $122,850, and for the proposed revised project $ 152,564.90.

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