Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1881, the work at Farmington River Shoals was completed at an expenditure of $4,919.70. Nothing was done during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882.

The means available are ample to continue the works of temporary alleviation, but not enough to even begin the permanent plan of improvement. This latter will require at least three years, and should not be begun with less than one-third of the estimate-about $450,000.

The benefit to be secured by the permanent work is to cheapen the transportation of bulky articles, such as coal, iron, and provisions, into a large manufacturing region now only reached by railroads. It includes the city of Springfield (at which is a United States Armory) and Holyoke, on the Connecticut, and other smaller places, and will be beneficial to the works at Miller's Falls, and may eventually be extended further. No appropriation is, however, asked for the next fiscal year.

Between Hartford, Connecticut, and Holyoke, Massachusetts.

July 1, 1881, amount available....
July 1, 1882, amount available....

$13, 669 80

13,669 80

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project........ 1,322, 805 00

Above Hartford and below Enfield Falls.

July 1, 1881, amount available..

$3,99 47

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881..

1,986 81

July 1, 1882, amount available.....

1,912 66

On or above Enfield Falls and below Holyoke, Massachusetts.

July 1, 1881, amount available.. July 1, 1882, amount available.. (See Appendix B 12.)

$10,702 92 10,702 92

13. Connecticut River below Hartford, Connecticut.-The Connecticut River from Hartford to its mouth at Saybrook is about 50 miles in length. The tide, which at the mouth of the river rises about 34 feet, rises but about 1 foot at Hartford when the river is at its lowest stage; when the river is 5 feet above its lowest stage the rise of tide is not appreciable at Hartford.

The chief obstacles to the free navigation of this river are, the bar at the mouth and the shoals between Middletown and Hartford, a distance of 16 miles. The most troublesome shoals are between Rocky Hill and Hartford, a distance of 9 miles, where the river banks are alluvial. The depth on the bar at Saybrook was, before commencing jetties, about 6 feet at mean low-water.

The shoals between Hartford and Rocky Hill form at every flood stage of the river, and require dredging to give the requisite 9 feet depth at low-water for the boats running between New York and Hartford.

The subject of improving this part of the river proper has received attention from a very early period, and work has been done upon it of a temporary character by the United States since 1870. In 1872 a thorough survey was made at Saybrook Bar and jetties designed for its permanent improvement. (See Appendix W 16, Annual Report 1873, for a full account of this bar.) In 1879 an accurate survey was made for the first time between Hartford and Rocky Hill, and a plan was proposed for the permanent improvement of this portion. (See Annual Report 1880, Appendix B 12.)

The amount expended since 1870 and prior to June 30, 1881, on surveys

and improvements are about as follows: At Saybrook bar, $122,493.58; between Middletown and Hartford, about $119,322.04.

The results have been a steady improvement of the navigation at Saybrook Bar, where the jetties are so nearly complete as to produce beneficial effect, and the ruling low-water depth has been increased from 6 feet to 8 feet.

Between Middletown and Saybrook the dredging of certain shoals has had to be annually repeated at low-water, and although this has afforded temporary relief, it was not possible often for it to be timely. Its unsatisfactory character has led to the adoption of a permanent plan of improvement, but the temporary dredging will have to be continued till the other is completed.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, about $8,000 was expended at Saybrook on the jetties in building up low places, and in dredging test pits to ascertain the character of the bottom.

The temporary dredging done between Hartford and Rocky Hill in keeping the channel open during the low-water stage cost about $7,000. About $12,000 was expended in building a wing-dam at Glastenbury Bar. This dam forms a part of the permanent plan of improvement for this part of the river.

The river since the dam has been completed has not been at a low enough stage, nor has time enough elapsed, to determine fully the effect of this dam, but examinations made show a slight increase of depth, and that the ice and freshets have not injured it.

The permanent river improvement requires for its completion $318,000, and until this is finished an annual appropriation of $6,000 is needed to keep the channel open.

The appropriation of $45,000 made by act of August 2, 1882, will be expended in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1883, in building up the jetties at Saybrook, and in dredging between them; in dredging at Salmon River, and in dredging between Hartford and Middletown for temporary relief at low-water.

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of

July 1, 1881, amount available..

[blocks in formation]

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883............

$35, 696 04

$27, 201 16

131 88

27,333 04

8,363 00

45,000 00

53,363 00

273,000 00

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.

Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884. 100,000 00 (See Appendix B 13.)

EXAMINATIONS AND SURVEYS FOR IMPROVEMENT.

To comply with provisions of the river and harbor act of March 3, 1881, Lieutenant-Colonel Warren was charged with and completed the following, the results of which were transmitted to Congress: 1. Edgartown Harbor and South Beach, Massachusetts. Printed as Senate Ex. Doc. 98, Forty-seventh Congress, first session. (See Appendix B 14.)

2. Buzzard's and Barnstable Bays, at the entrance of the proposed Cape Cod Canal. Printed as Senate Ex. Doc. 104, Forty-seventh Congress, first session. (See Appendix B 15.)

And to comply with a resolution of the House of Representatives of January 24, 1882:

3. Vineyard Haven Harbor, Massachusetts. Printed as House Ex. Doc. 112, Forty-seventh Congress, first session. (See Appendix B 16.)

IMPROVEMENT OF HARBORS AND RIVERS ON LONG ISLAND SOUND.

Officer in charge, Maj. J. W. Barlow, Corps of Engineers.

1. Stonington Harbor, Connecticut.-Originally this harbor was an open bay, unprotected from southerly storms and obstructed by a middle ground having at low-water a depth of but 6 feet at the shoalest part. This middle ground nearly filled the harbor and left but a narrow channel on either side of insufficient depth to permit vessels of 12 feet draught to reach the upper wharves at low-water. A small breakwater, or pier, costing $36,753 was built in 1828-30 from the east shore about half way up the harbor, to protect the commerce of the village.

Plans for more extensive improvements were considered in 1872, the object being to afford by means of additional breakwaters a large anchorage to serve as a harbor of refuge for general commerce, and also, by dredging, to secure an increased depth in the upper harbor for the accommodation of the local shipping interest.

During the season of 1873-74, $45,000 was expended in dredging, which resulted in the enlargement of the channel to the steamboat wharf by removing the northern portion of the middle ground to a depth of 12 feet. Subsequently a breakwater 2,025 feet in length, costing $103,190, was built off Wamphassuck Point, the southwestern limit of the harbor, and a similar work has been commenced on Bartlett's Reef as a protection from southeast storms. The completion of the latter will afford a harbor of refuge of large dimensions, thoroughly sheltered, and an available anchorage for vessels drawing 18 feet of water.

The total amount appropriated for the improvement of this harbor to the present date is $240,620.49, of which 210,594.17 had been expended June 30, 1881, with result as described above, the length of the Bartlett's Reef breakwater built at that time being 535 feet.

Operations during the year ending June 30, 1882, have consisted in continuing the construction of the Bartlett's Reef breakwater, the amount expended being $29,345.88, the length built 535 feet. The total length of the work now built is 1,070 feet. It is designed to be at least 2,000 feet long, and will cost about $50 per linear foot. July 1, 1881, amount available...

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881..

$30,026 32

July 1, 1882, amount available..

Amount appropriated by act passed August 2, 1882.

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883..

29,345 88

680 44

25,000 00

25,680 44

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....

20,000 00

Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884 20, 000 00 (See Appendix C 1.)

2. New London Harbor, Connecticut. This harbor is by nature the finest on Long Island Sound and one of the best in the United States. It is accessible for all classes of vessels at all seasons, and is extensively used as a harbor of refuge.

The improvement now in progress consists in removing a shoal in the upper part of the harbor above the city of New London, which obstructs the approach to the large receiving and shipping wharf of the New London Northern Railroad Company. The project for the removal of

this shoal was adopted to comply with the river and harbor act of June 14, 1880, which directed that the sum of $2,500 from the appropriation for improving the Thames River be applied to that object. The operations have consisted in dredging, the material removed being sand and gravel mixed with large bowlders.

The total amount appropriated for this work to the present date is $6,800, of which $2,500 had been expended June 30, 1881, in making a depth of 16 feet at mean low-water over the extreme southern part of the shoal.

Operations during the past fiscal year have consisted in dredging from the southern part of the shoal, removing 6,619 cubic yards of stones and sand and 140 tons of bowlders, making the depth 14 feet at mean low-water; the amount expended was $4,141.11.

It is estimated that the sum of $8,200 will be required to complete the projected work.

July 1, 1881, amount available....

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities, July 1, 1881

July 1, 1882, amount available.....

Amount appropriated by act passed Angust 2, 1882..

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883

$4,300 00

4, 141 11

158 89

9,000 00

9,158 89

8,200 00

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884. 8, 200 00 (See Appendix C 2.)

3. Thames River, Connecticut.-The navigation of this river was originally obstructed by shoals for a distance of about 3 miles below the city of Norwich, the depth in some places being but 7 feet at mean low-water and the channel narrow and tortuous.

In 1830 plans were adopted for improving navigation with a view to affording a channel 100 feet wide and 14 feet deep at mean high-water. These plans included, besides a large amount of dredging, the construction of a number of wing-dams extending from each shore, to straighten the channel and direct the currents. This project was considered completed in 1873 after an expenditure of $147,300.

Subsequently the shoals reformed to a considerable extent, due to heavy freshets in the river, and in 1878 appropriations for their removal were renewed. At that time the project was modified so as to make the depth 14 feet at mean low-water instead of at mean high-water, a difference of 3 feet, and under this plau $25,104.09 had been expended to June 30, 1881. The total amount appropriated for this river to the present date is $221,800.

With a view to making the excavated channel more permanent the officer in charge recently submitted, as an auxiliary to dredging, a project for the construction of longitudinal dikes to produce a more regu lar and uniform flow of the tidal currents, in the expectation that the latter will aid in forming and maintaining the required width and depth. In previous annual reports it has been stated by the officer in charge that the demands of navigation would probably require a greater width of channel than the 100 feet originally contemplated. This demand has now become so imperative that he feels constrained to recommend a modification in the existing plan, increasing the width to 200 feet. The estimated cost of the entire project as modified, including training walls, is $188,080.

Operations during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, have resulted in the removal by dredging of 43,575 cubic yards of sand from the

channel between the city of Norwich and the rolling-mill; 7,528 cubic yards from the shoal opposite Mohegan; and 3,416 cubic yards from Allyn's Point; the depth made was 14 feet at mean low-water. Commencement has also been made on the construction of longitudinal dikes, the one at Trading Cove Flats having been built to a length of 750 feet.

With the appropriation now available, this dike will be completed to its full length of 2,400 feet, and dredging in the channel to the amount of 95,000 cubic yards will be executed.

July 1, 1881, amount available

July 1, 1882, amonnt expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881 ......

July 1, 1882, amount available

Amount appropriated by act passed August 2, 1882.

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883..

$49,395 91

20, 421 19

28, 974 72

35,000 00

63,974 72

153,080 00

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884. 100,000 00 (See Appendix C 3.)

4. New Haven Harbor, Connecticut.-This harbor is a broad, open bay, exposed in its lower part to southerly winds, and obstructed by several sunken rocks. In its upper part it was originally so shallow that vessels exceeding 9 feet draught were unable to reach the wharves at low-water.

The first efforts for improvement were made in 1852, and were directed to the removal of rocks at the entrance of the harbor.

Plans for dredging a channel of navigable width and 13 feet deep at mean low-water were adopted in 1871, and modified in 1878, so as to make a depth of 16 feet at mean low-water throughout the entire channel.

The total amount appropriated for this improvement to the present date is $201,000, of which $182,875.27 had been expended June 30, 1881, and had resulted in obtaining a channel of 16 feet depth, which was 320 feet wide, from Fort Hale to Long Wharf, and thence to the Steamboat Wharf, 400 feet wide.

Operations during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, have resulted in the removal of 117,400 cubic yards of material from the channel opposite and below Long Wharf, making the present available width in this part of the channel 440 feet.

The improvement now most required is an increased depth on the Fort Hale Bar. As the depth gained here by dredging is not permanent, it is proposed with the next appropriation to begin the construction of a dike extending south from Sandy Point, to increase the scour over this bar and to prevent the drift of material from West Haven beach. The length of the dike should be about 4,400 feet, and its cost is estimated at $60,000.

July 1, 1881, amount available..

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881

July 1, 1882, amount available...

Amount appropriated by act passed August 2, 1882..

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883....

[blocks in formation]

Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884. 30,000 00 (See Appendix C 4.)

5. Breakwater at New Haven, Connecticut.—New Haven Harbor was

« AnteriorContinuar »