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G 6.

IMPROVEMENT OF CHESTER RIVER AT KENT ISLAND NARROWS, MARYLAND.

Nothing has been done at this locality since September, 1877. There is a balance available, but it has not been considered necessary to expend it. As an occasion for doing so does not seem likely to arise, there is no good reason why the existing balance may not be covered into the Treasury.

July 1, 1881, amount available..

Money statement.

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881..

July 1, 1882, amount available..

$2,581 45

81 45

2,500 00

G 7.

IMPROVEMENT OF THE HARBOR OF QUEENSTOWN, MARYLAND. Nothing has been done at this locality in the fiscal year ending June 1882.

30,

G 8.

IMPROVEMENT OF THE PATAPSCO RIVER, BALTIMORE, MARYLAND. At the date of the last Annual Report a contract had just been made with the American Dredging Company, of Philadelphia, for dredging the "cut-off" shown in the sketch on page 862 of the Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1881. The excavation was to be to a depth of 27 feet at mean low-water as a beginning of the execution of the project to increase the depth of the channel from 24 feet at mean low-water. Two large machines were put to work in August, 1881, a third in September, 1881, and two more have been since built for this contract, so that at the end of June, 1882, there are five, with a sufficient number of attending tugs and dumping scows. The contract calls for the removal of 2,250,000 cubic yards of material. Up to the end of June, 1882, there have been removed only 709,725 cubic yards.

The contract time expires with the year 1882. While there has been much delay due to high winds in the exposed place where the dredges are at work, and while it is believed much more rapid progress will be made with the dredges now at work when the first cut has been carried through, it is evident that a more rapid rate is necessary, and the contractors are engaged in making arrangements for attaining it. It is hoped that with the additional funds provided by Congress the end of the year 1883 will see a channel to the city of Baltimore 27 feet deep at low-water. This will be narrow, not more probably than 150 or 200 feet wide, but work looking to an increase of width will be at once begun as soon as the narrower channel is ready of 27 feet depth at low-water. It should be remembered, however, that while the width of 300 feet has up to this time been found sufficient for the requirements of the commerce of Baltimore, it has been always considered as the minimum, and

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so called in official reports. As the commerce increases, the numl er of the largest vessels increases in the constant use of the channel. greater width than 300 feet will be needed at no distant day.

Money statement.

July 1, 1881, amount available.

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year exclusive of

outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881.

July 1, 1882, outstanding liabilities.

$322,717 10

$77,539 32
6,816 53

84,355 85

July 1, 1882, amount available...

Amount appropriated by act passed August 2, 1882

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30,1884.

238,361 25 450, 000 00

688,361 25

450, 000 00 450,000 00

AN ACT for the protection of the aids to navigation, established by the authority of the United States Light House Board within the State of Maryland.

SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the general assembly of the State of Maryland, That any person or persons who shall moor any vessel or vessels of any kind or name whatsoever, or any raft or any part of a raft, to any buoy, beacon, or day-mark, placed in the waters of Maryland by the authority of the United States Light-House Board, or shall in any manner hang on with any vessel or raft, or part of a raft, to any such buoy, beacon, or day-mark, or shall willfully remove, damage, or destroy any such buoy. beacon, or day-mark, or shall cut down, remove, damage, or destroy any beacon or beacons erected on land in this State by the authority of the said United States LightHouse Board, or, through unavoidable accident, run down, drag from its position, or in any way injure any buoy, beacon, or day-mark as aforesaid, and shall fail to give notice as soon as practicable of having done so to the light-house inspector of the district in which said buoy, beacon, or day-mark may be located, or to the collector of the port, or, if in charge of a pilot, to the collector of the port from which he comes, shall, for every such offense, be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof before any court of competent jurisdiction, shall be punished by a fine not to exceed two hundred dollars, or by imprisonment not to exceed three months, or both. at the discretion of the court; one-third of the fine in each case shall be paid to the informer, and two-thirds thereof to the Light-House Board, to be used in repairing the said buoys or beacons.

SEC. 2. And be it enacted, That it shall be unlawful for any vessel to anchor on the range line of any range lights established by the United States Light-House Board in this State, unless such anchorage is unavoidable, and the master of any vessel so anchoring shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof before any court of competent jurisdiction, shall be punished by a fine not to exceed fifty dollars; one-half of the fine in each case to be paid to the informer and one-half to the State.

SEC. 3. And be it enacted, That the cost of repairing or replacing any such buoy, beacon, or day-mark which may have been misplaced, damaged, or destroyed by any vessel or raft whatsoever, having been made fast to any such buoy, beacon, or daymark, shall, when the same shall be legally ascertained, be a lien upon such vessel or raft, and may be recovered against said vessel or raft, and the owner or owners thereof, in any action of debt in any court of competent jurisdiction in this State. SEC. 4. And be it enacted, That this act shall take effect immediately.

Approved this 30th day of March, 1882. [THE GREAT SEAL.]

MARYLAND, set:

GEO. HAWKINS WILLIAMS,

President of the Senate.
OTIS KIELHOLTZ,
Speaker of the House of Delegates.

WILLIAM T. HAMILTON, Governor.

I, Spencer C. Jones, clerk of the court of appeals of Maryland, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a full and true copy of the act of the general assembly of Mary

land, of which it purports to be a copy, as taken from the original law belonging to and deposited in the office of the clerk of the court of appeals aforesaid.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand as clerk, and affixed the seal of the said court of appeals, this 3d day of April, A. D. 1882. [SEAL.]

SPENCER C. JONES, Clerk Court of Appeals of Maryland.

CHAPTER 14.-AN ACT to repeal chapter 405 of the acts of the general assembly of Maryland, passed at the January session, 1870, entitled "An act to protect the Craighill Channel at the mouth of the Pa tapsco River," and re-enact said act with amendments, so as to provide for the protection of the Craighill Channel and the cut-off between the Brewerton and Craighill channels at the mouth of the Patapsco River.

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SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Maryland, That chapter 405 of the acts of the general assembly of Maryland, passed at the January session in 1870, entitled An act to protect the Craighill Channel at the mouth of the Patapsco River," be and the same is hereby repealed and re-enacted so as to read as follows: That any person or persons dragging, raking, or dredging for oysters within five hundred yards of either edge of the new channel at the mouth of the Patapsco River, known as the "Craighill Channel," extending from the seven-foot Knoll to the mouth of the Magothy River, or within five hundred yards of either edge of the cut-off connecting the Brewerton and Craighill channels, shall forfeit his or their boat or vessel, and it shall be lawful for any justice of the peace of the county or city in which such person or persons shall be arrested to try such person or persons, and on conviction to condemn said boat or vessel, and sell the same on five days' notice, and fine the said offender or offenders a sum not less than five dollars nor more than twenty-five dollars for each and every offense, and the said justice of the peace shall pay over one half of said fines and forfeitures to the informer, and the other half to the school board of said county or city.

SEC. 2. And be it enacted, That this act shall take effect from the date of its passage.

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I, Spencer C. Jones, clerk of the court of appeals of Maryland, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a full and true copy of the act of the general assembly of Maryland, of which it purports to be a copy, as taken from the original law deposited in and belonging to the office of the clerk of the court of appeals of Maryland. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand as clerk, and affixed the seal of the said court of appeals, this 31st day of March, A. D. 1882. [SEAL.]

SPENCER C. JONES, Clerk Court of Appeals of Maryland.

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS.

CUSTOM-HOUSE, BALTIMORE, MD.,
Collector's Office, July 28, 1882.

SIR: In compliance with your request, the 18th of May last, you are herewith furnished with statistics of the commerce of the port of Baltimore for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1882, together with other facts of trade and business relating thereto, namely:

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Guano importations have increased fourfold; it is an important trade of this port, and is rapidly growing.

Total, 1882.
Total, 1881.

Increase

CHIEF IMPORTS, DUTIABLE.

$8, 179, 098 7,332,996

846, 102

This exhibit, when compared with that of the fiscal year of 1881, shows a decrease in the total value of articles imported free of duty. The falling off, however, is not due to a decline generally in this class of merchandise, but mainly arises from a reduction in quantity of certain articles of free imports, especially that of coffee.

The dutiable importations exceed in value those of the preceding year, although there has been a decline in certain chief articles imported; in others there has been a marked increase sufficient to overbalance that decline and to swell the total value to a figure beyond that of last year. Under the circumstances it is a good showing, and affords an encouraging evidence of the capabilities of the trade and commerce of the port of Baltimore.

The preceding year was one of severe strain upon the commercial interests of the country; the decline in the crops, together with reduced quantities of the chief articles of export and the higher values to which they attained, produced a serious check to the export trade of the country, and this result affected the import trade. The decline in certain articles of imports shown by the exhibit was due to this cause freights only one way could not be carried but with disastrous results to vessel property, hence freights for Europe, with no cargo in return, were declined, except at rates that the importer could not pay. Importations, therefore, were limited to the gauge of actual demand.

The port of Baltimore has shared these conditions; contracts were made in the opening of the year for heavy deliveries of merchandise, but for want of carriage the freight could not be shipped. It was deemed due to the trade of this port to mention these facts, although familiar ones, to show that notwithstanding their effects upo■ business and commerce, this port, as shown by its exhibit, evidences noteworthy vigor.

Comparative statement of certain imported dutiable merchandise showing increase in value.

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The following statement will show the invoice value and amount of duty on merchandise imported at this port, intended for transportation to interior ports, with and without appraisement.

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Transportation in bond without appraisement, under act of June, 1880.

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The principal items entering into these statements are steel blooms, steel wire, iron ore, pig iron, scrap iron, scrap steel, earthenware, decorated china, glassware, musical instruments, &c.

These importations are continuing ones from place of shipment through this port to final destination, and, as the exhibit shows, are increasing in volume, and clearly indicate the important relation of this port to the country, and especially to the cities of the great West and the States in which they are located.

STATEMENT SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF DUTY COLLECTED AND DUE ON MERCHANDISE IMPORTED DURING THE YEAR.

Duties collected..

$2,953,677 11

Duties due on merchandise in bond

Duties due on merchandise transported in bond with appraisement..
Duties due on merchandise transported in bond without appraisement.

Currency collected, fees, &c

165,953 19 28,463 59 235, 641 0

3,383, 734 91 161,930 25

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STATEMENT SHOWING THE EXPORTS DURING THE YEAR AND VALUE OF THE SAME. Exports, 1881

Exports, 1882

Decrease..

$72, 449, 071 38, 534, 426

33,914, 645

Although the total value of exports does not reach the figures of the fiscal year ended June, 1881, due to special causes heretofore mentioned, yet there has been an increase in quantity and value of many articles, showing that the general line of exports has been steady and vigorous.

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