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shoalest part of which there was originally but 15 feet at mean low

water.

3. The area in front of the Grand Trunk Railway wharves dredged to a depth of 20 feet at mean low-water, and all that in front of the Harbor Commissioner's Line, from Atlantic Wharf up to Merrill's Wharf, to a depth of 16 feet, where before, on its shoalest part, there was but 4 feet of water at mean low-water.

4. The channel in Back Bay, from Tukey's Bridge up to the stoneshed wharves, dredged to a width of not less than 100 feet and for a depth of 8 feet, where before, on its shoalest part, there was but 2 feet of water at mean-low water.

5. Sunken rocks and a wreck removed from the harbor.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, the additional sum of $45,851.04 has been expended, whereby about 250,000 cubic yards of dredging has been done at the "Middle Ground" in the lower part of the harbor, giving an additional width of about 400 feet to the main channel, making its aggregate width about 900 feet for a depth of about 21 feet at mean low-water.

To complete this channel will require about 500,000 cubic yards of dredging additional, the estimated cost of which is $110,000, of which $35,000 has been appropriated by the river and harbor act of August 2, 1882.

The officer in charge asks that $75,000 be appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1884, for completing the dredging at the "Middle Ground."

July 1, 1881, amount available..

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881

July 1, 1882, amount available

Amount appropriated by act passed August 2, 1882

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883.....

$46,700 69

45, 519 23

1,181 46 35, 000 00

36, 181 46

75,000 00

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project. Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884. 75,000 00 (See appendix A 9.)

10. Richmond's Island Harbor, Maine.-The project for the improve ment of this harbor was adopted in 1872, the object being to afford a harbor of refuge by means of a rubble-stone breakwater about 2,000 feet in length, which connects the island with the mainland.

The total amount expended thereon up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, was $110,000, whereby the breakwater has been built to the projected length in completion of same.

July 1, 1881, amount available...

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881

(See Appendix A 10.)

$3,092 82

3,092 82

11. Kennebunk River, Maine.-The project originally adopted for the improvement of this river consisted in the erection, in 1829-52, of two granite piers at its mouth to afford a permanent entrance to the river, and of a wharf a short distance above for the security of vessels when detained by tides and storms. With the appropriations made in 1870 and 1871, aggregating $10,000, these piers were extended and repaired, and the wharf above was also repaired. This project was modified in 1876, the object being to afford a channel of navigable width from the

mouth of the river up to Kennebunkport, a distance of about 1 mile, and of not less than 4 feet in depth at mean low-water, or 13 feet at mean high-water.

The amount expended from 1870 to June 30, 1881, is $19,004.64, and has resulted, in addition to the extension and repairs of the piers and wharf, in the completed improvement of the channel as projected.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, the sum of $966.61 has been expended on this work, which has resulted in the completion of the repairs on the government wharf and of the piers at the mouth of the river.

The amount now available is to be applied to such repairs of the wharf and piers as hereafter may be found necessary.

July 1, 1881, amount available....

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881

July 1, 1882, amount available...

(See Appendix A 11.)

$1,995 36

966 51

1,028 85

12. Winnipiseogee Lake, New Hampshire.- The project for the improvement of this lake was adopted in 1879, the object being to afford at its outlet into Long Bay a channel 50 feet in width and not less than 5 feet in depth in the lowest known stage of the water, the estimated cost of which was $7,500.

For completing this improvement the following sums have been appropriated by Congress, viz:

By the river and harbor act of June 14, 1880..
By the river and harbor act of March 3, 1881

$5,000

2,500

Total....

7,500

Under the appropriation of June 14, 1880, a contract was made for 4,450 cubic yards, more or less, of dredging, which was commenced in June, 1881, and finished in October, whereby the channel above the bridge at Weir's was completed.

Under the appropriation of March 3, 1881, a contract was made for 2,500 cubic yards, more or less, of dredging below the bridge, under which 1,540 cubic yards of dredging has been done, with a probability that it will be completed not later than the 31st of August next.

July 1, 1881, amount available..

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881

July 1, 1882, amount available....

(See Appendix A 12.)

$7,395 65

4,129 60

3,266 05

13. Lamprey River, below New Market, New Hampshire.-The project for the improvement of this river was adopted in 1874, the object being to afford a channel of navigable width and not less than 11 feet in depth at mean high-water from its mouth to the head of tide-water at New Market, a distance of about 21⁄2 miles. The natural channel is in places narrow and crooked, and much obstructed by sunken rocks and shoals, with not more than 9 feet of water upon them at mean high-water.

By the river and harbor act of March 3, 1881, the sum of $10,000 was appropriated for the improvement of this river, which has been applied in part during the past year to the removal of sunken rocks, and the

unexpended balance is to be applied to the further improvement of the channel up to the head of the Upper Narrows.

The amount appropriated by the river and harbor act of August 2, 1882 (viz, $10,000) it is proposed to apply to the completion of the work projected for the improvement in front of New Market wharves, and to the removal of some of the sunken rocks from the channel below. The officer in charge asks that $4,000 be appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1884, for completing the projected improvement of this river:

July 1, 1881, amount available..

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881 ....

$9,991 25

4,316 50

[blocks in formation]

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884.
(See Appendix A 13.)

4,000 00

4,000 00

14. Exeter River, New Hampshire. The project for the improvement of this river was adopted in 1880; the object being to afford a channel of navigable width from the mouth of the river up to the head of tidewater at Exeter, and of not less than 10 to 12 feet in depth at mean highwater. The natural channel was narrow and crooked, and obstructed by sunken rocks, and in its shoalest part, in Exeter, it had not more than 73 feet at mean high-water.

The following appropriations have been made by Congress for completing all the work projected for the improvement of this river, to wit:

By the river and harbor act of June 14, 1880..
By the river and harbor act of March 3, 1881.

Total

$20,000

15,000

35,000

The amount expended on this work during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, is $32,927.08, including outstanding liabilities, which has resulted in the completion of all the work projected for the improvement of this river.

July 1, 1881, amount available..

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881

(See Appendix A 14.)

$31,973 08

31,973 08

15. Portsmouth Harbor, New Hampshire. The project for the improvement of this harbor was adopted in 1879, the object being

1. To close, by means of a rubble-stone breakwater, the channel between Great Island and Goat Island, so as to prevent the strong current of flood-tide from passing through that channel, as by it vessels in going up the harbor have often been thrown upon Goat Island Ledge, which projects into the channel, here very narrow.

2. The removal of Gangway Rock to a depth of 20 feet at mean lowwater, or 28 feet at mean high-water, which lies in the channel between South Beacon Shoal and the navy-yard, the shoalest part of which has but 12 feet of water on it at mean low-water, and 9.7 feet at extreme low-water of spring-tides.

3. The removal, in part, to a depth of 10 feet at mean low-water, of the ledge at the southwest point of Badger's Island, upon which vessels

are liable to be, and often have been, thrown in coming down the harbor on the ebb-tide.

The estimated cost of this improvement is $155,000, for which the fol lowing appropriations have been made by Congress, to wit:

By river and harbor act of March 3, 1879.
By river and harbor act of June 14, 1880
By river and harbor act of March 3, 1881
By river and harbor act of August 2, 1882.

Total ....

$10,000

25,000

20,000

17,000

72,000

The total amount expended up to July 1, 1881, on this project was $14,590.15, whereby the breakwater between Great Island and Goat Island was completed, and about 100 cubic yards of Gangway Rock had been broken up and removed to a depth of 20 feet at mean lowwater.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, about 260 cubic yards of Gangway Rock have been broken up and removed to grade, making a total of 360 cubic yards to that date. It is probable that the remaining 340 cubic yards to be removed under the existing contract will be completed before the 1st of December, 1882.

On the 15th of April, 1882, a contract was made for the removal of 600 cubic yards, more or less, of the sunken ledge on the southwest point of Badger's Island to a depth of 10 feet at mean low-water, at $18 per cubic yard, measured in situ, the same to be completed on or before the 30th of June, 1883. Operations were commenced on the 5th of May under this contract, and have been continued up to the 30th of June, resulting in the removal to grade of about 50 cubic yards.

The balance of funds now available, together with the $17,000 appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1883, it is proposed to apply to the completion of the removal of the ledge on the southwest point of Badger's Island, and to the further removal of Gangway Rock to the projected depth.

The officer in charge asks that $50,000 be appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1884, for continuing the removal of Gangway Rock. July 1, 1881, amount available....

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881

July 1, 1882, outstanding liabilities...

July 1, 1882, amount available....

Amount appropriated by act passed August 2, 1882.

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883 ...

$40,409 85

$7,947 71
2,043 00

9,990 71

30, 419 14 17,000 00

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884. (See Appendix A 15.)

47, 419 14

=

83,000 00 50,000 00

16. Newburyport Harbor, Massachusetts.-The project for the improvement of this harbor (at its entrance) was adopted in 1880, after a special survey, the object being to make a permanent channel of sufficient width and depth to enable vessels drawing 13 feet of water to enter it in safety at all times of tides and storms. The project consists of two converging rubble-stone jetties built out from the shores north and south of the entrance (the northern with a length of 2,910 feet, and the southern of 1,500 feet), so as to have between their outer ends an

entrance of about 1000 feet in width, and not less than 17 feet in depth at mean low-water, or 24 feet at mean high-water.

The present estimated cost of northern jetty is
And of the southern jetty

Total......

$250,000

115,000

365,000

Under the appropriations made therefor by the river and harbor acts of June 14, 1880, and March 3, 1881, aggregating $90,000, a contract has been made for furnishing and placing in the northern jetty, at and near its shore end, 60,000 tons, more or less, of rubble-stone, at $1.32 per ton of 2,240 pounds.

The quantity of stone furnished and placed in the northern jetty during the past fiscal year is 30,366 tons of 2,240 pounds, and it is prob able that the whole contract will be completed not later than the 31st of December next.

This jetty has now been built out from high-water mark, in partial completion of same, for a distance of about 1,200 feet, and it is expected that on the completion of the present contract it will be extended out for an additional distance of about 600 feet.

It is proposed to apply the appropriation made for the improvement of this harbor by the river and harbor act of August 2, 1882, to the commencement of the southern jetty at its shore end, and to such other work as a further survey shall show to be most necessary.

The officer in charge asks that $70,000 be appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1884, for the extension of the northern and southern jetties.

July 1, 1882, amount expended during fiscal year, exclusive of

July 1, 1881, amount available..

outstanding liabilities July 1, 1881.

July 1, 1882, outstanding liabilities.

July 1, 1882, amount available..

Amount appropriated by act passed August 2, 1882

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1883..

$87, 414 18

$38,041 00
3,934 41

41,975 41

45, 438 77

40,000 00

85,438 77

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project........ Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1884. (See Appendix A 16.)

235,000 00 70,000 00

17. Merrimac River, Massachusetts.-The present project for the improvement of this river was adopted in 1870, and modified in 1874; the object being to afford a channel of navigable width, with a depth of not less than 9 feet at mean low-water (or about 163 feet at mean highwater), from its mouth at the outlet of Newburyport Harbor up to Deer Island Bridge, a distance of about 5 miles; and thence up to Haverhill Bridge (an additional distance of 12 miles), a depth of 12 feet at ordinary high-water, the rise and fall of tides varying from 73 feet to 4 feet; and thence up to the head of the "Upper Falls" (an additional distance of 4 miles), a depth of not less than 43 feet in the ordinary stages of the river with the mill-water at Lawrence running; the rise and fall of the tide varying from 4 feet at Haverhill to 0 at the foot of the "Upper Falls."

The natural channel of this river was very narrow and crooked in several places, and much obstructed by sunken ledges, bowlders, and shoals, and especially at "The Falls," portions of which were covered with bowlders and ledges, more or less bare, and impassable for any

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