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STATISTICAL VIEW

OF THE

COMMERCE

OF THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:

INCLUDING ALSO AN ACCOUNT OF

BANKS, MANUFACTURES AND INTERNAL TRADE

AND IMPROVEMENTS:

TOGETHER WITH THAT OF THE

REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES

OF THE

GENERAL GOVERNMENT:

ACCOMPANIED WITH NUMEROUS TABLES.

BY TIMOTHY PITKIN.

NEW HAVEN:

DURRIE & PECK.

1835.

Entered according to an Act of Congress, in the year 1835, by

TIMOTHY PITKIN,

in the Clerk's office, of the District Court of Connecticut.

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PREFACE.

IN presenting the public with a new and enlarged edition of our Statistics of the United States, we beg leave to observe, that the last edition was published in 1817, just after Europe had emerged from a long and unexampled war-a war, in which the United States themselves at last, became involved.

Since that period, this country has been placed in a new situation, as the European nations on the return of peace, returned to their old systems of commercial and colonial policy. This has driven the Americans to look more to their own internal means and resources. And as the population of the United States, has also, since that time, nearly doubled, it cannot be deemed an uninteresting subject of inquiry, whether, in this situation, the wealth and resources of the country have kept pace with its population.

We have brought down the accounts of the external commerce of the United States, as far as practicable, to the years 1833 and 1834. In doing this, we have consulted foreign as well as domestic official and other documents, in order to shew the extent of American commerce and navigation, not only in comparison with preceding periods, but also, in comparison with the commerce and navigation of other nations. We have, thereby, been enabled to shew how nearly the amount of American tonnage approximates to that of the British; and also, to give a more full and accurate account of the trade of the United States with China, than is furnished by our own custom house books.

We have, also, in the present edition, extended our inquiries to the internal wealth and resources of our country, limiting them, however, principally, to the great subjects of banks, manufactures, and internal improvements, by means of canals, rail roads, and steam navigation. This we have done, with a view of ascertaining, as far as practicable, the extent and value of the domestic production and consumption of the necessary articles of national supply, and to see how far the United States are dependent on foreign nations, for such articles.

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