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RECORDS AGAINST TIME ON KITE-SHAPED TRACK.

John S. Johnson, at Independence, Iowa, on a kite-shaped track, made the following records: 100 yards, flying start......

standing start

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.04 3-5
.12 2-5;
.24 2-5;
-55;

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.09 1-5

,17 1-5

.39 3-5

.59 2.5

1.21

..... 1.58 1-5

COMPETITIVE RECORDS.

TIME.

.31 1-5 1.00 2-5

1.41 1-5

2.08 1-5

4.31 3-5

7.15 3-4 10.12 1-5 12.04 1-5 15.15 4-5

NAME.

George C. Smith Hartford,

H. C. Tyler... Springfield,

George F.Taylor

W. C. Sanger...

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PLACE.

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John S. Johnson Minneapolis,
C. T. Knisley... Chicago,
H. C. Wheeler.. New York,
J. W. Linneman Chicago,

46

Aug. 18,
July 11,
Aug. 26,

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17.43 3-5

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THE TURF. TROTTING RECORDS.

1 mile, by a mare, 2.04, Nancy Hanks, Terre Haute, Ind., Sept. 28, 1892. By a stallion, 2.05, Directum, Nashville, Tenn., October 18, 1893. By a gelding, 2.094 against time, Guy, Detroit, Mich., July 21, 1893. By a mare in a race, 2.07, Alix, Chicago, Sept. 14, 1893. Fastest three consecutive heats in a race, 2.10, 2.07% 2.08%, Directum, Fleetwood Park, N. Y., Nov. 2, 1893.

2 miles, 4.32, Greenlander, against time, Terre Haute, Ind., Nov. 4, 1893.

3 miles, 6.55%, Nightingale, against time, Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 20, 1893. In a race, 7.19%, Bishop Hero, Oakland, Cal., Oct. 7, 1893.

4 miles, 10.52% (over half-mile track), Satellite, Keokuk, la., Aug. 12, 1887.

5 miles, 12.30, Bishop Hero, in a race, Oakland, Cal, Oct. 14, 1893.

10 miles, 26.15, Pascal, against time, Fleetwood Park, N. Y., Nov. 2, 1893.

20 miles, 58.25, Captain Megowen, Boston, Mass., Oct. 31, 1865.

50 miles, 3.55.40%, Ariel, Albany, N. Y., May 5, 1846.

100 miles, 8.56.01, Conqueror, Long Island, Nov. 12, 1853.

TROTTING TO WAGON.

1 mile, 2.13, Guy, Detroit, Mich., July 18, 1893. Fastest three consecutive heats, 2.16%, 2.17, 2.17, Hopeful, Chicago, Ill., Oct. 12, 1878. 2 miles, 4.56%, General Butler, Long Island, June 18, 1863: Dexter, Long Island, Oct. 27, 1865. 3 miles, 7.53%, Prince, Long Island, Sept. 15, 1857.

5 miles, 13.432, Little Mac, Long Island, Oct. 29, 1863.

10 miles, 28.02%, John Stewart, Boston, Mass., June 30, 1868.

20 miles, 58.57, Controller, San Francisco, Cal., April 20, 1878.

50 miles, 3.58.04, Spangle, Long Island, Oct. 15, 1855.

DOUBLE-TEAM TROTTING.

PACING RECORDS.

I mile, by a gelding, in a race, 2.04, Mascot, Terre Haute, Ind., Sept. 29, 1892, and Flying Jib, Chicago, Sept. 15, 1893, both against time. In a race, by a stallion, 2.054, Saladin, Kirkwood, Del., July 4, 1893. By a stallion, against time, 2.05, Direct, Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 10, 1892. By a mare, 2.08%, May Marshall, Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 19, 1893. Fastest two consecutive heats, 2.04, 2.06, Mascot, Detroit, Mich., July 21, 1893. Fastest three consecutive heats, 2.064, 2.07, 2.07%, Robert J., Lexington, Ky., Oct. 12, 1893.

2 miles, 4.474, dead heat between Defiance and Chieftain, Sacramento, Cal., Sept. 26, 1872.

3 miles, 7.44, James K. Polk, Long Island, Sept. 13, 1847.

4 miles, 10.342, Longfellow, San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 31, 1869.

5 miles, 12.544, Lady St. Clair, San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 11, 1874.

PACING UNDer Saddle.

1 mile, 2.13, Johnston, Cleveland, O., Aug. 3, 1888.

2 miles, 4.57%, James K. Polk, Philada., June 10, 1850.

3 miles, 7.44, Oneida Chief, Hoboken, N. J., Aug. 14, 1843.

PACING WITH RUNNING Mate.

I mile, 2.014, Westmont, Chicago, Ill., July 10, 1884.

PACING TO WAGON.

1 mile, 2.13 (kite track), Roy Wilkes, Independence, la., Oct. 30, 1891; 2.14% (circular track), Johnston, Detroit, Mich., July 21, 1887.

RUNNING RECORDS.

1⁄2 mile, 46 seconds, Geraldine, Morris Park, Aug. 30, 1889.

1⁄2 mile, 57 seconds, Dr. Hasbrook, Morris Park, Oct. 1, 1892.

1 mile, 2.12%, Belle Hamlin and Honest George, mile, 1.09, Domino, Morris Park, Sept. 29, Providence, R. I., Sept. 23, 1892.

TROTTING THREE HOOKED TOGETHER.

1 mile, 2.14, Belle Hamlin, Justina, and Globe, Cleveland, O., July 31, 1891.

TROTTING FOUR-IN-HAND. mile, 2.37. William H., Nobby, Mambrino Sparkle, and Clemmie G., Cleveland, O., Sept. 17, 1886.

TROTTING WITH RUNNING Mate.

1893.

mile, 1.23%, Bella B., Monmouth Park, July 8, 1890.

1 mile, 1.35%, Salvator, Monmouth Park, Aug. 28, 1890.

11⁄2 miles, 1.511⁄21⁄2, Tristen, Morris Park, June 2, 1891.

1% miles, 2.034, Banquet, Monmouth Park, July 17. 1890.

11⁄2 miles, 2.324, Lamplighter, Monmouth Park, Aug. 9, 1892.

1% miles, 2.48, Hindoocraft, Morris Park, Aug. 27, 1889.

I mile, 2.031⁄2, Ayres P. (kite track), Kirkwood, 1 miles, 3.00, Hotspur, Bay District, Cal., Del., July 4, 1893.

TROTTING UNDER SADDLE.

1 mile, 2.15, Great Eastern, Fleetwood Park, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1877.

2 miles, 4.53%, George M. Patchen, Long Island, June 12, 1860.

3 miles 7.32%, Dutchman, Hoboken, N. J., Aug. 1, 1839.

4 miles, 10:51, Dutchman, Long Island, May 11, 1836.

April 30, 1891.

1% miles, 3.20, Enigma, Sheepshead Bay, Sept. 15. 1883.

2 miles, 3.27%, Tenbrook, Louisville, May 29, 1877.

3 miles, 5.24. Drake Carter, Sheepshead Bay, Sept. 6, 1884.

4 miles, 7.154, Tenbrook, Louisville, Sept. 27, 1876.

to miles, 26.18, Mr. Brown, Rancocas, March 2, 1880.

INTERNATIONAL CRICKET.

HOUSEHOLD ART.

THE twentieth annual match between the THE ART OF LIVING COMFORTABLY, WITH SURUnited States and Canada was played at Toronto on September 11, 12, and 13, 1893, and resulted as follows:

First Second innings. innings. United States................. 177 Canada 87

Total.

147 (6 wkts.)324

236

323

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258

Philadelphia ........... 525

Australia... .............................. 199

Total.

525

457

Philadelphia won by an innings and 67 runs. The second match, played at Manheim on October 6, 7, and 9, 1893, resulted

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Second

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innings.

innings.

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Total.
225

74 (4 wkts.) 227 Australia won by 6 wickets and 1 run.

PHILADELPHIA CRICKET.
THE following tables show the games won and
lost by each club in the contest for the Halifax
Cup, and the points won and lost for the Club-
Record Cup in 1893:

ROUNDINGS that are Refined Even IF THEY ARE INEXPENSIVE. TO KNOW WHAT THINGS TO HAVE, WHAT THINGS TO DO, AND HOW TO KEEP IN HEALTH IS THE PERFECTION OF ART. IF LEDGER-readers would but preserve their Almanacs from year to year and have them bound for reference, the constant asking for repeated receipts and suggestions would be spared them. A great many helps to good living have been published in these Almanacs, and what are given this year are but a continuation in the long series-not by any means complete in themselves.

THINGS TO HAVE.

THE atmospheric oil-can, which works with a pressure like the atmospheric tea-pot-a pressure on the knob at its top. By this means any lamp can be filled without either turning a spigot or tilting the oil can; and, by the same contrivance, if the oil-holder gets too full in the lamp, so that it will spill over if moved, a reverse movement draws the oil out again, back into the can, so that not a drop need be wasted.

THE discussion about “individual" salt-cellars is amusing. If people put their knives or their fingers into the salt, then, of course, they have spoiled it ever to appear again on the table. But if they use only the salt-spoon, as tiny as a doll's tea-spoon, but sufficient, then there is no dif ference whatever in nicety between the using of the small salt-cellar and that of the large ones at the table-corners. A salt-cellar between each Won. Lost. Unfinished. two "covers" or persons at the table is the most

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elegant plan. Salt-cellars, like ink-stands, should
hold a very small quantity, so that they can be
replenished freshly every day. But each cellar
must have its separate spoon, if it be only the
pretty pewter ones that come with the doll's set.
Pewter is a beautiful metal, as the owners of old
aluminum spoons for the salt, and there should
But we shall soon have
pewter platters know.
and gold, Silver tarnishes so soon when it holds
be no room for any other metal except aluminum
salt that spoons of this cheap new metal or the
most expensive of all are the ones to procure.

A TRAVELLING trunk that requires no traylifting, called the "chiffonier trunk," was exhibited and medalled at Chicago. It opens with doors at the front, and is really a travelling bureau in leather.

dough does not easily adhere to it; yet a large A GLASS rolling-pin is useful, because the bottle in a skilful hand does very well to roll out pie-crust.

THINGS TO KNOW.

WHEN anybody's boots seem hopelessly stiffened by having been out in the rain and improperly dried, kerosene oil comes to the rescue. It renews their softness. First wipe and brush the mud entirely off; then apply the kerosene thoroughly, rubbing it well into the leather be fore it dries. Give them a second treatment, and dry gradually in a moderately warm place. When thoroughly dry, wipe them again with the flannel and a little oil; finish with shoe-polish.

How to arrange an invalid's pillows where a flat posture is not required: Put at least two pil

lows-three are better-flat upon the bolster, thus building up a pillow-wall. Then rest another pw, beaten smooth, perpendicularly against the front of the row. This supports the shoulders and allows the body to get into comfortable posture, as the rear wall of pillows, though solid and firm, will "give" sufficiently to fit into the projections of the body.

It goes easier if you turn in your toes while climbing the stairs.

HOLD your chin in and you will fully inflate your lungs; if you also keep your head up you cannot stoop.

HOT water for hemorrhages, as scalding as it can be borne.

Nor a minute more than seven for "drawing" any tea. Pour it off from the tea-leaves then, or else lift them out in a wire strainer.

LEARN to know a mushroom by its smell. It has a pleasant earthiness.

INSTEAD of boiling wormy chestnuts, throw them all into cold water first, when the spoiled ones will rise to the top. To keep chestnuts, put them in a box with layers of salt. Salt absorbs moisture from the air, and the shells are kept moist as well as slightly "pickled."

ONE ideal fare for a throaty cold is a jelly of Irish moss sweetened with rock candy and flavored with lemon-juice. The iodine the ** Carrageen" contains is most penetrating, and is said to make this jelly good for "rheumatics" also.

BELLADONNA pellets, third potency, should be carried and used by all persons of apoplectic tend

encies. Their action is to make the circulation more even and to divert the blood from the head. When apoplexy begins, however, get leeches to the patient's nostrils as soon as possible. Nosebleed is the natural relief, and artificial nosebleed the next best thing. Of course, maintain the sufferer in an upright posture.

To bring down a bulky figure and to sleep well, walk where you used to ride in the streetcars; eat just half your customary quantity, or eat nothing after four o'clock tea.

WASH black lace in logwood decoction.

IF you boil your soap before wash-day, the soap-jelly will go much farther than the lather from the piece of soap will. Let it be said here that good soft-soap, bought of a reliable maker, is the best as well as the cheapest thing to use in the laundry. If you have not got a barrel in the cellar, then you can make soft-soap out of hard once a week by the following directions: Slice a half pound of soap thinly, and melt it, the day before it is wanted, in two quarts of water until it makes a jelly. Stir it about while it is simmer ing down. One cupful of this to two gallons of hot water makes a good lather, in which the clothes may have their first washing.

RAW meat-juice is prepared by mincing the sticking-piece fine and then adding cold water in the proportion of one part of water to four of meat. Stir the mixture thoroughly, and let it stand in a cool place half an hour. Press through cheese-cloth or a coarse napkin. This is one of the foods for little children. The best way to get cooked beef-juice is to broil a rump-steak rare

on a gridiron, and then, with one of the meatpressers that come for the purpose, squeeze the juice out of it. Be sure to salt and pepper it, or it will not be very palatable; red pepper is best

FRIED eggs done in olive oil will be found more delicate than when lard or butter is used. The oil should be of the best quality, and it takes very little two tablespoonfuls will fry four eggs. Heat the oil thoroughly, and drop the eggs in very carefully. Contrary to the accepted idea, the best authorities advise turning a fried egg. Cook not more than twenty seconds on each side, turning them with a pancake-turner.

PIE-CRUST is always better for being rolled up a day before it is baked. Keep it in the ice-chest or in a very cold place. The shortening seemhs to diffuse itself better for standing over a day, and it is more flaky when again roiled out.

MAKE your omelettes with hot water instead of with cold milk. A tablespoonful of water to each egg, and stir the eggs rather than beat them.

"FINNAN HADDIES," the salted haddock, should be cut in fillets, soaked in a small kettle of water which is brought slowly to the boii, then immediately drained and rinsed with c id Broil them on a gridiron, and serve with melted butter and little pickled cucumbers.

water.

A RUSSIAN salad of cucumbers differs from our way of serving this melon. They add fennelseed or caraway-seed, which counteracts the chill which cucumber is said to produce (catarrh of the stomach), and then dress simply with o and vinegar. Cucumbers are sometimes boiled, being first pared and sliced, with the seeds remoyed. In this way they are used around hash.

HAVE the gridiron very hot before you put the beefsteak on it. You need not grease the bars if you have done the better thing-oiled the steak on both sides. A tablespoonful of sweet oil well rubbed in, some hours before cooking, will conand if you will put a spoonful of hot vinegar with vert a tough steak into a tender one any day; a bit of the steak's suet melted together in a tin cup as it is broiling, and pour over it as soon as it is dished, you will ensure a rarely tender steak.

ORANGE fritters, or any sort of fruit fritters, are a light and pretty dish to eke out a dinner. Make the frying-batter with three-fourths of a pound of sifted flour, a level teaspoonful of salt, two ounces Put of fresh butter, and the yolks of two eggs. the butter into a hot bowl, which will melt it sufficiently while you beat in the eggs and lightly stir in the flour. Add to this gradually a half pint of tepid water, and stir the whole together with a wooden spoon until it looks like thick

cream.

Prepare this at any time, and set aside until the minute when you want it. Prepare the oranges-thin-skinned ones; peel them, divide into quarters, remove the pips, and then put them to steep in a bowl with a spoonful of sugar and some grated rind of the orange. Before frying the fritters drain the pieces of orange from the syrup.

Add to the batter the white of two

eggs, well beaten to a stiff froth. Dip each piece of orange (with a toothpick skewer) into the batter Drop them into the "blue-steam lard heated to that point. Take out immediately with a skimmer, put on a hot plate in the oven, sift powdered sugar thickly over them, and serve.

DIPLOMATIC INTERCOURSE, 1894.

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