The Perils of Prosperity, 1914-1932

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University of Chicago Press, 2010 M05 7 - 332 páginas
Beginning with Woodrow Wilson and U.S. entry into World War I and closing with the Great Depression, The Perils of Prosperity traces the transformation of America from an agrarian, moralistic, isolationist nation into a liberal, industrialized power involved in foreign affairs in spite of itself.

William E. Leuchtenburg's lively yet balanced account of this hotly debated era in American history has been a standard text for many years. This substantial revision gives greater weight to the roles of women and minorities in the great changes of the era and adds new insights into literature, the arts, and technology in daily life. He has also updated the lists of important dates and resources for further reading.

“This book gives us a rare opportunity to enjoy the matured interpretation of an American Historian who has returned to the story and seen how recent decades have added meaning and vividness to this epoch of our history.”—Daniel J. Boorstin, from the Preface

Dentro del libro

Contenido

Prologue
1
1 Armageddon
11
2 Innocents Abroad
30
3 The Fourteenth Point
49
4 Red Scare
66
5 The Politics of Normalcy
84
6 The Reluctant Giant
104
7 Tired Radicals
120
10 The Second Industrial Revolution
178
11 Political Fundamentalism
203
12 The Sidewalks of New York
225
13 Smashup
241
Epilogue
265
Important Dates
271
Suggested Reading
275
Acknowledgments
297

8 A Botched Civilization
141
9 The Revolution in Morals
157

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Acerca del autor (2010)

William E. Leuchtenburg is William Rand Kenan Professor Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the author of numerous books on twentieth-century American history, including the Bancroft Prize-winning Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal, 1932-1940.

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