The Principles of Psychology, Volumen1

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H. Holt, 1890 - 1393 páginas
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Contenido

I
xi
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10
III
79
IV
102
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122
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139
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177
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193
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XVI
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Página 349 - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception.
Página 349 - I may venture to affirm of the rest of mankind that they are nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions, which succeed each other with an inconceivable rapidity, and are in a perpetual flux and movement.
Página 125 - As we become permanent drunkards by so many separate drinks, so we become saints in the moral, and authorities and experts in the practical and scientific spheres, by so many separate acts and hours of work. Let no youth have any anxiety about the upshot of his education, whatever the line of it may be. If he keep faithfully busy each hour of the workingday, he may safely leave the final result to itself.
Página 482 - And hence, perhaps, may be given som* reason of that common observation, — that men who have a great deal of wit and prompt memories have not always the clearest judgment or deepest reason.
Página 547 - And everybody praised the Duke Who this great fight did win.' 'But what good came of it at last?' Quoth little Peterkin: — 'Why, that I cannot tell,' said he, 'But 'twas a famous victory.
Página 350 - The mind is a kind of theatre, where several perceptions successively make their appearance ; pass, repass, glide away, and mingle in an infinite variety of postures and situations. There is properly no simplicity in it at one time, nor identity in different, whatever natural propension we may have to imagine that simplicity and identity. The comparison of the theatre must not mislead us. They are the successive perceptions only, that constitute the mind ; nor have we the most distant notion of the...
Página 292 - ... and acted as if we were non-existing things, a kind of rage and impotent despair would ere long well up in us, from which the gWellest bodily tortures would be a relief ; for these would make us feel that, however bad might be our plight, we had not sunk to such a depth as to be unworthy of attention at all.
Página 125 - Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state.
Página 237 - Consciousness, then, does not appear to itself chopped up in bits. Such words as ' chain' or ' train' do not describe it fitly as it presents itself in the first instance. It is nothing jointed; it flows. A ' river' or a ' stream' are the metaphors by which it is most naturally described.
Página 123 - No matter how full a reservoir of maxims one may possess, and no matter how good one's sentiments may be, if one have not taken advantage of every concrete opportunity to act, one's character may remain entirely unaffected for the better. With mere good intentions, hell is proverbially paved. And this is an obvious consequence of the principles we have laid down. A "character...

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