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Familiar Astronomy,

OR, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF THE HEAVENS.

ILLUSTRATED

BY CELESTIAL MAPS, AND UPWARDS OF 200 FINELY EXECUTED ENGRAVINGS

TO WHICH IS ADDED

A TREATISE ON THE GLOBES AND A COMPREHENSIVE ASTRONOMICAL DICTIONARY.

FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS, FAMILIES, AND PRIVATE STUDENTS.
BY HANNAH M. BOUVIER.

Preface.

THIS work, embracing all the recent observations of the heavenly bodies, is intended to be a complete treatise on Astronomy, conducting the pupil, step by step, from the base to the summit of the structure; explaining as far as practicable, by figures and diagrams, all the celestial phenomena, and the laws by which they are governed, without entering into those mathematical details which properly belong to treatises designed for those who propose to make Astronomy their chief study.

This science, formerly but little taught in seminaries, now claims the attention of all enlightened teachers; its importance having been acknowledged by the greatest men of all ages.

Besides elevating the mind and improving the thinking faculties, it is of the utmost utility to man. Without Astronomy we could have no true knowledge of geography, no proper computation of time, and no correspondence between distant nations. For, as Lacaille observes, "Astronomy is the governor o the civil division of time, the soul of chronology and geography, and the only guide of the navigator."

The present work is divided into five parts: the first treats of the laws whicn govern the heavenly bodies; the second, of the components of the solar system, and the phenomena attending their movements; the third, of the sidereal heavens, embracing the fixed stars, clusters, and nebulæ; the fourth, of the principal instruments used in the observatory; and the fifth, of the use of the globes. To which is appended two celestial maps and a comprehensive Astronomical Dictionary, which will facilitate the studies of the pupil, and relieve the teacher from much explanation which would otherwise be unavoidable. The value of this feature of the work must be obvious to all.

In order to carry out the method thus proposed, the form of question and answer has been adopted, because the plan possesses peculiar advantages. It is calculated to concentrate the attention of the pupil upon the subject under immediate consideration; to dwell upon every point until perfectly understood; to define the precise limits of each proposition; and to afford means for enlarging the explanations without crowding the mind with ideas but imperfectly comprehended.

Short notes in smaller type have been introduced throughout the text, which serve to elucidate the figures and diagrams, and to convey more complete explanations of particular subjects. There is a series of notes at the end of the work, which will facilitate the advancement of those who may wish to enter more fully into this arduous, yet fascinating, study.

The maps, figures, and diagrams have been carefully drawn, and are executed in the best manner. Thus it will be seen that nothing has been spared to render this work useful and attractive to the pupil, as well as to the student of riper years; at once qualifying it to occupy a place in the school-room, the study, or the parlor.

An intimate knowledge of the heavenly bodies renders them as familiar as friends; so that he who can be induced to turn occasionally from the cares and disappointments of life to the study of the heavens, will be amply recompensed by the rational entertainment which it affords.

HILTON, CROSSWICKS, N. J., 1855.

70,000 COPIES SOLD.

PETERSON'S FAMILIAR SCIENCE,

OR THE

SCIENTIFIC EXPLANATION OF COMMON THINGS.
EDITED BY R. E. PETERSON,

MEMBER OF THE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCE, PHILADELPHIA.
12mo, Sheep, 558 Pages. Common-school edition, 18mo, Arabesque binding,

From Professor James C. Booth, A.M., M.A.P.S., Author of the Encyclopedia of Chemistry; Melter and Refiner in the U. S. Mint ; Professor of Applied Chemistry in the Franklin Institute.

ANALYTICAL LABORATORY, COLLEGE AVENUE, }

July 3,

DEAR SIR-I have examined "Familiar Science" with some care, and must express a hearty approval of the manner in which the most "common things" of life are familiarly and clearly explained, without sacrificing the correctness of science. Embracing such questions as are usually put by the developing mind of children, with clear and precise answers, it will relieve parents and teachers of the unhappy necessity of crushing youthful inquiry, while it will tend to nourish a spirit of reflection and investigation in young and old. I commend it as a valuable catechism for schools, and for amusement and instruction at the fireside. Respectfully yours,

JAS. C. BOOTH.

From Wm. H. Allen, LL.D., President of Girard College, Philadelphia. GIRARD COLLEGE, May 6, 1851.

I have read parts of each division of the work, and have been pleased with the precision of the questions and the accuracy of the answers. The book is not merely a volume of familiar knowledge, but a volume in which much rare and profound knowledge is made familiar to the common mind and applied to common things. I consider the book a valuable contribution to our means of instruction in schools, and hope to see it generally introduced and used by teachers. Fathers of families also, who are now frequently puzzled by the questions of the young philosophers of their households, will do well to procure a copy, and avoid saying so often, "I do not know."

WM. H. ALLEN.

From the Hon. V. M. Rice, Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of New York.

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, ALBANY, Oct. 17, 1855.

I consider it well adapted to instruct youth in the principles of fundamental law which constitute the foundation of our national polity.

I hope you will succeed in an enterprise in which the people as freemen are so deeply interested. V. M. RICE.

From the Hon. Theodore Sedgwick, the Eminent Jurist and Author. NEW YORK CITY, Oct. 23, 1855.

I have examined it with care, and think it calculated to be of great and general utility. The work does what it undertakes to do, in a simple, concise, and at the same time a satisfactory manner, and is entitled to take a permanent place as a manual and work of convenient and ready reference.

There never was a time when it was more desirable to keep constantly before the mind of our people the incalculable importance of the Constitution of the United States, to familiarize them with the profound wisdom, the strong spirit of fraternal attachment, and the simple grandeur which breathes throughout the Charter of our Liberties. The more it is studied, and the better it is known, the more impossible will it appear for us materially to improve upon the great original.

Faithfully to carry out its provisions according to their fair intent, to live up to its spirit no less than its letter, is the vital interest as well as the manifest duty of every true American. THEODORE SEDGWICK.

From James Bayard, Esq., Author of "A Brief Exposition of the Constitution of the United States, &c."

PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 18, 1855.

MESSRS. CHILDS & PETERSON :-Gentlemen-Accept my thanks for a copy of SHEPPARD'S CONSTITUTIONAL TEXT BOOK, which I have examined, and think it calculated to be a very useful book.

2

The arrangement is natural and simple, and the exposition of each clause of the Constitution in its order is clear and well expressed, so as to form an excellent work, well adapted to the purpose for which it is intended. There is also considerable information on matters connected with the main subject, which add much to the value of the work, and will make it very useful as a text-book of the Constitution.

A knowledge of the Constitution is of the highest importance in this country, and its study should be a part of the education of every citizen. As a means of promoting this object, Mr. Sheppard's book is exceedingly valuable, and it would be well if it could be introduced into every school in the country.

Respectfully yours,

JAMES BAYARD.

THE

CONSTITUTIONAL TEXT-BOOK:

A

PRACTICAL AND FAMILIAR EXPOSITION

OF

THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES,

AND

OF PORTIONS OF THE PUBLIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT.

DESIGNED CHIEFLY FOR THE

USE OF SCHOOLS, ACADEMIES, AND COLLEGES.

BY

FURMAN SHEPPARD.

"It is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your National Union to your collective and individual happiness: that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it: accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity."

WASHINGTON'S Farewell Address to the People of the United States.

PHILADELPHIA:

CHILDS & PETERSON, 124 ARCH ST.

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