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JUNGLE LAW

By Robert Herrick

Contributed to National Security League's Campaign of Patriotism Through Education.

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CENTRAL AMERICAN UNION Owing to the suggestion made that a Central American Congress of Plenipotentiaries be convened in order to renew the conventions made at Washington in 1907 and especially the convention establishing the Central American Court of Justice, the Government of Honduras, through Señor Doctor Francisco Bertrand, President of the Republic, in accepting the proposition has communicated with the other Governments of Central America proposing that the projected Conference of Plenipotentiaries be principally occupied in establishing the bases of Central American Union.

President Bertrand made the proposition considering that the moment has arrived to reconstruct the old Central American Nation and being inspired by the sentiments of fraternity which now exist between the

der her monstrous creed of applied materialism, illuminated as it has been by every sort of cynical crime, with its reasoned defiance of contract, its principle of "indispensable severities," its military logic, etc., THAT must become the moral law of all the world-the jungle law! In order to survive, we must all accept this law of the jungle. And of all the prostrate peoples of the world forced to accept the victor's new version of the ancient commandments, proud America would be the first. We cannot resist the fascination of success. So the German ideal, the German tyranny over the individual, the German moralityone rule for you and me as individuals and another utterly irresponsible rule when we get together as a state would be imitated by us more than the German thoroughness in civil and military organization.

peoples and Governments of Central America.

The initiative of the President of Honduras has been accepted by the Governments of Central America and at present the bases and the fixing of the place for the assembly of the plenipotentiaries are being discussed.

Throughout Central America there have been founded clubs, propaganda centers, and newspapers favoring the idea. In the capital of Honduras the propaganda is under the direction of a central committee which has sent two delegates to each of the Central American States. These delegates have been cordially received by the Governments and have been the objects of enthusiastic demonstrations of sympathy on the part of student and workmen associations and also on the part of the newspapers and the people in general.-Bulletin of the Pan American Union.

By JOSEPH E. DAVIES

Commissioner of Corporations and Member of the Federal Trade Commission. Abstract of Address before the Academy of Political Science at Columbia University, December 16, 1917.

N

EVER in the history of the nation has American industry been as highly efficient or more intelligently coordinated than at the present time in the great effort to win the war. Despite disorganization of ordinary channels of industrial activity which the war has projected it is my belief that such reorganization has already been perfected through the intelligence of American business and labor, that the results in the volume of proluction which a few months disclose, would astonish even those accustomed to think in terms commensurate with the great wealth and natural resources of the country. Still greater coordination will be projected and the efficiencies brought by the stimulus of great national necessity will remain for the benefit of the future.

Democracy is not built for war. War is not its business. Our industrial organization is designed for peace. It would not be surprising if in this great change a democracy should do some muddling. The experience of England and France were, however, before us; and many costly mistakes were avoided. The substantial achievements of the past few months are eloquent of the adaptability and capacity of the genius of our people and the quality of national leadership which the nation now en

joys. Still greater coordination and effectiveness is in sight. The ablest leaders of labor and the greatest business men of the nation are working with government agents to that end. The wisdom and clarity of vision of the President of the United States assure that there shall be no division of responsibility and authority to impair national effectiveness. Still greater concentration of responsibility necessary to executive efficiency may be expected. The government is thinking in terms of winning this war. The problems of price-fixing, government participation in industry, and other activities, and the problems of the future which they will entail, are being accepted and dealt with to the one end of winning the war. Greater equalization of profit in those industries where price-fixing has been necessary may be expected. An extension of power in the exercise of priority is probable, for price-fixing without control over distribution is ineffective. A still greater participation of government itself in industry may be necessary. Whatever may be necessary for still greater coordination and effectiveness of industry will be done to win the war.

It is, I believe, a manifestation of of divine Providence that in this critical period when great forces affecting the future of democracy are in the

making that there should be at the helm of the ship of state, a leader, who is thinking in terms of preserving individualism in democracy, whose wisdom is based upon those fundamental principles which the economic and political history of the world has established, and who is so directing these great forces that they may be of

the greatest effectivness to win the war, and yet may be such that with victorious peace there should remain to the greatest possible degreę such conditions as are compatible with the ideals of democracy, to wit: the greatest possible freedom and wellbeing of the individual which is compatible with the social welfare.

THE KAISER ASSURES HIS ARMY THAT THE LORD IS THEIR AVOWED ALLY

Following is the cabled report of the "iron fist and shining sword" address by Emperor William to the Second Army on the French Front, December 22, 1917:

"It has been a year full of events for the German Army and the German Fatherland. Powerful blows have been delivered, and your comrades in the east have been able to bring about great decisions.

"There has been no man, no officer and no general on the whole eastern front, wherever I have spoken to them, who has not frankly admitted that they could not have accomplished what they have if their comrades in the west had not stood to a

man.

"The tactical and strategical connection between the battles on the Aisne, in the Champagne, Artois, and Flanders and at Cambrai, and the events in the east and in Italy is so manifest that it is useless to waste words on it.

In

"With a centralized direction, the German Army works in a centralized manner. order that we should be able to deliver these offensive blows one portion of the army had to remain on the defensive, hard as this is for the German soldier. Such a defensive battle, however, as has been fought in 1917 is without parallel. A fraction of the German Army accepted the heavy task, covering its comrades in the east unconditionally, and it had the entire Anglo-French Army against itself.

"In long preparation the enemy had collected unheard-of technical means and masses of ammunition and guns in order to make his entry into Brussels over your front, as he proudly announced. The enemy has achieved nothing.

"The most gigantic feat ever accomplished by an army and one without parallel in history was accomplished by the German Army. I do not boast. It is a fact and nothing else. The admiration you have earned shall be your reward and at the same time your pride. Nothing can in any way place in the shade or surpass what you have

accomplished, however great and overwhelming it may be.

"The year 1917 with its great battles has proved that the German people has in the Lord of Creation above an unconditional and avowed ally on whom it can absolutely rely. Without Him all would have been in vain.

"Every one of you had to exert every nerve to the utmost. I know that every one of you in the unparalleled drumfire did superhuman deeds. The feeling may have been frequently with you:

"If we only had something behind us; if we only had some relief!' It came as the result of the blow in the east, where it is seen that the storms of war there are at present silenced. God grant that it may be forever.

"Yesterday I saw and spoke to your comrades near Verdun, and there, passing through all minds like the scent of the morning breeze was the thought: 'You are no longer alone.' The great successes and victories of the recent past, the great days of battle in Flanders and before Cambrai, where the first crushing offensive blow delivered upon the arrogant British showed that despite three years of war and suffering our troops still retained their old offensive spirit, have their effect on the entire Fatherland and on the enemy.

"We do not know what is still in store for us, but you have seen how in this last of the four years of war God's hand has visibly prevailed, punished treachery, and rewarded heroic persistence. From this we can gain firm confidence that the Lord will be with us in the future also.

"If the enemy does not want peace, then we must bring peace to the world by battering in with the iron fist and shining sword the doors of those who will not have peace."

Special Articles of Permanent Value to the Cause of International Progress

Tell Your Friends to Get Them

PLATFORM OF THE WORLD'S COURT LEAGUE, by Charles H. Levermore.

THE MOVEMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE AND JUDICIAL SETTLEMENT, by James Brown Scott.

EXISTING FOUNDATIONS FOR JUDICIAL SETTLEMENTS, by Denys P. Myers. WHAT THE LEAGUE TO ENFORCE PEACE PROPOSES, by William Howard Taft. FOUR OBJECTIONS TO PROPOSALS OF THE LEAGUE TO ENFORCE PEACE, by William Jennings Bryan.

INTERNATIONAL OUTLAWRY AS AN ALTERNATIVE FOR FORCE, by Simeon E. Baldwin.

THE WORK OF INTERNATIONAL REBUILDING, by Henri La Fontaine.

In World Court Magazine

for December. Price, 10 Cents. THE DEMAND FOR A TRUE INTERNATIONAL COURT, by Theodore Marburg. POWER OF THE SUPREME COURT OVER DEFENDANT STATES, by Jackson H. Ralston.

WHY THE APPARENTLY HELPLESS SUPREME COURT SUCCEEDS, by William I. Hull.

THE STUDY OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS IN AMERICAN COLLEGES, by Charles H. Levermore.

WHAT MUST BE THE BASIS OF A DURABLE PEACE? by "Cosmos."

THE LATEST CHAPTER IN CENTRAL AMER-
ICA, by Denys P. Myers.

In World Court Magazine
for January. Price, 10 Cents.

HOW TO STUDY THE PROBLEMS OF THE
WAR, by Norman Angell.

A WORKING LIBRARY FOR STUDENTS OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, by Charles H. Levermore.

OUR NEW WEST INDIAN AMERICANS, by Denys P. Myers.

HISTORIC PROPOSALS FOR LEAGUES OF WORLD PEACE, by Sterling E. Edmunds. THE SCHEME FOR A LEAGUE OF NATIONS, by H. N. Brailsford.

Sent Postpaid on

UNIVERSITY TEACHERS' CONFERENCE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, by John In World Court Magazine

Mez.

for February. Price, 10 Cents. AMERICAN CONSTRUCTIVE PROPOSALS FOR INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE, by Charles H. Levermore.

FOUR PLANS FOR DURABLE PEACE, by William I. Hull.

INTERNATIONAL POLICE TO ENFORCE WORLD PEACE, by William Howard Taft. OPPOSITION ΤΟ FORCE FOR AN INTERNATIONAL PEACE LEAGUE, by Henry Cabot Lodge.

SOME PROBLEMS TO BE SOLVED IN AN EFFORT TO ENFORCE PEACE, by Emerson McMillin.

WASHINGTON AND INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE, by James Brown Scott.

AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP AND JUSTICE IN JAPANESE RELATIONS, by Dr. T. Iyenaga. THE KIND OF PEACE SOCIALISTS CALL FOR, by Victor L. Berger and Others. INTERNATIONAL FREEDOM OF TRADE NECESSARY FOR PEACE, by John Davis.

A MINIMUM PROGRAM FOR ORGANIZING A
DURABLE PEACE.

In World Court Magazine
for March. Price 10 Cents.

THE NEW RUSSIA AND THE NEW INTER-
NATIONALISM, by Victor S. Yarros.

AN INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL OF CONCILIA-
TION, by Fannie Fern Andrews.
WORLD ORGANIZATION AFTER THE WAR,
by a Member of the League to Enforce
Peace.

THE NEW YORK STATE PLAN FOR UNI-
VERSAL TRAINING, by John H. Finley.
EDUCATIONAL PREPAREDNESS, by Paul
Monroe.

DECLARATION OF AMERICAN LABOR'S PoSITION IN PEACE OR IN WAR, by Samuel Gompers and Others.

THE COMMUNITY OF NATIONS, a British

manifesto.

In World Court Magazine for April. Price, 10 Cents.

Receipt of Price

Address: WORLD COURT MAGAZINE, Equitable Bldg., 120 Broadway, New York

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