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BASES FOR A LEAGUE OF NATIONS
PRESIDENT WILSON DRAWS THE FIRE OF GERMAN DIPLOMACY

FIRST STEPS FOR A LEAGUE OF NATIONS .

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By Nicholas Murray Butler BRITISH VIEWS OF A LEAGUE OF NATIONS .

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Mr. Asquith on a World-Wide Peace Partnership-Lord Lansdowne
Favors a Combination of All the Powers-Lord Robert Cecil Would
Go As Far As Possible-Henderson for a League Based on the Good
Will of Peoples

WILL OF THE PEOPLE IN MACEDONIA

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By Edward L. Conn 150

By Georges Roussos, Grecian Minister FACING THE RUSSIAN TRAGEDY. FREEDOM FOR THE BALKAN RACES By Charles H. Levermore 156 THE ALSACE-LORRAINE PROBLEM AGAIN

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David Starr Jordan on German Fallacies-Why Take a New Vote:
P. A. Brangier-The Democratic Qualifications for Voting: Ernest
Cawcroft-The Lost Provinces: George Creel

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ENLISTING URBAN "SLACKER" LANDS. By Charles Lathrop Pack 167 A SWISS VIEW OF PEACE TERMS

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170

THE NEED OF THE TIMES
By Christian L. Lange 174
PRESIDENT WILSON REPLIES TO VON HERTLING AND COUNT
CZERNIN

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CHANCELLOR VON HERTLING'S DIPLOMATIC ASSENT TO
PRESIDENT WILSON'S PRINCIPLES. .

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ORGANIZED LABOR STANDS FOR PRESIDENT WILSON'S WAR
AIMS

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BRITISH LABOR PROPOSALS FOR AFTER-THE-WAR RECON

STRUCTION

WAR DECLARATIONS OF PEACE ORGANIZATIONS .

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace-American Association for
International Conciliation-The Church Peace Union-World Peace Foun-
dation-American School Peace League-American Peace Society-New
York Peace Society-Chicago Peace Society-The Church and The War

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THE WORLD'S COURT LEAGUE, INC.

PLATFORM

We believe it to be desirable that a League among Nations should be organized for the following purposes:

1. A World Court, in general similar to the Court of Arbitral Justice already agreed upon at the Second Hague Conference, should be, as soon as possible, established as an International Court of Justice, representing the Nations of the World and, subject to the limitations of treaties, empowered to assume jurisdiction over international questions in dispute that are justiciable in character and that are not settled by negotiation.

2. All other international controversies not settled by negotiation should be referred to the Permanent Court of Arbitration at the Hague, or submitted to an International Council of Conciliation, or Commissions of Inquiry, for hearing, consideration and recommendation.

8. Soon after peace is declared, there should be held either "a conference of all great Governments," as described in the United States Naval Appropriation Act of 1916, or a similar assembly, formally designated as the Third Hague Conference, and the sessions of such international conferences should become permanently periodic, at shorter intervals than formerly.

Such conference or conferences should

(a) formulate and adopt plans for the establishment of a World Court and an International Council of Conciliation, and

(b) from time to time formulate and codify rules of international law to govern in the decisions of the World Court in all cases, except those involving any constituent State which has within the fixed period signified its dissent.

4. In connection with the establishment of automatically periodic sessions of an International Conference, the constituent Governments should establish a Permanent Continuation Committee of the conference, with such administrative powers as may be delegated to it by the conference.

THE WORLD'S COURT LEAGUE, INC.

Equitable Building, New York

MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

I desire to become a member of The World's Court League and receive the WORLD COURT MAGAZINE for one year, for which I enclose Two Dollars.

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HENRY CLEWS

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OFFICERS

President of the League

CHARLES LATHROP PACK

President of the International Council President of the National Advisory Board
NICHOLAS MURRAY BUTLER
ALBERT SHAW

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Frank L. Babbott Nehemiah Boynton George W. Kirchwey Walter L. McCorkle

Gilbert A. Beaver John D. Brooks

W. B. Millar

Frederick Lynch John Martin
Albert Shaw

Charles Willard Young
EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

Secretary of the Board of Governors

SAMUEL T. DUTTON, General Secretary

CHARLES H. LEVERMORE, Cor. Secretary

FRANK CHAPIN BRAY, Editorial Sec'y

The officers of The World's Court League cordially invite you to join them in preparing the way for more just and harmonious international relations after the war. Forty-four nations have already voted for the Court of Justice which will be the chief corner-stone of a new world structure. While a League of Nations presupposes a better adjustment of international questions, the greatest assurance of security and durable peace rests in a World Court.

The platform of the League is in harmony with the great work accomplished by the two Hague Conferences and with the treaties which have been made by the United States with thirty nations, providing for delay and inquiry in case of any international difficulty.

To advance and concentrate public opinion the League publishes THE WORLD COURT MAGAZINE. A payment of two dollars makes you a member of The World's Court League and furnishes the magazine for one year.

The League also desires contributions of from five to one thousand dollars for the support of this world-wide movement which is intended to make another war with its horrors and distress unlikely if not impossible.

Use the coupon on opposite page.

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Entered as second class matter, September 16, 1912, at the Post Office at New York
Copyright, 1915, by The World's Court League, Inc.

For delays in delivering magazines, owing to war conditions of transportation and mail service, it is necessary to ask readers of THE WORLD COURT to make patriotic allowance.

B

BASES FOR A LEAGUE OF NATIONS

EFORE our eyes the league of Central Powers is forcing peace from the Baltic to the Black Sea. This league leaves no military, economic or diplomatic weapon unused to enforce its kind of peace. To us that means more war, not peace. To us the German enforced peace is raw conquest, plunder, robbery of Russia. None of the Entente Allies has yet recognized the fait accompli even with the People's Republic of Ukraine. Secretary Balfour says the final fate of occupied provinces must ultimately be decided at the peace conference. The United States alone thought it worth while at any time to officially express sympathy with the "poisoned" Russian people upon whom Imperial German peace is being imposed. While the Bolshevists still indulge in howls at the "usurpers" the Russian army melts away and

ruling classes in occupied provinces welcome the order-bringing Germans with open arms. Listen to Prince Leopold of Bavaria, Austro-German commander on the Eastern front, saying to his troops: "Russia is sick and is trying to contaminate all the countries in the world with a moral

infection. We must fight against the disorder inoculated by Trotzky and defend outraged liberty. Germany is fortunate in being the incarnation of the sentiments of other order-loving peoples." We shall hear more of this divisive issue of order against disorder before the war is

over.

In the situation German militarism may claim altogether too much and overreach itself. Immediately the "menace" tends to strengthen the psychological fighting bonds of the Entente Allies and America. But it

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