Women in Early America: Struggle, Survival, and Freedom in a New World

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ABC-CLIO, 2004 - 495 páginas
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This volume fills a gap in traditional women's history books by offering fascinating details of the lives of early American women and showing how these women adapted to the challenges of daily life in the colonies.


Women in Early America: Struggle, Survival, and Freedom in a New World provides insight into an era in American history when women had immense responsibilities and unusual freedoms. These women worked in a range of occupations such as tavernkeeping, printing, spiritual leadership, trading, and shopkeeping. Pipe smoking, beer drinking, and premarital sex were widespread. One of every eight people traveling with the British Army during the American Revolution was a woman.

The coverage begins with the 1607 settlement at Jamestown and ends with the War of 1812. In addition to the role of Anglo-American women, the experiences of African, French, Dutch, and Native American women are discussed. The issues discussed include how women coped with rural isolation, why they were prone to superstitions, who was likely to give birth out of wedlock, and how they raised large families while coping with immense household responsibilities.


  • Nearly 200 A-Z entries on women's lives, contributions, and struggles during the years of early America
  • Illustrations of the habits of dress, material goods, and buildings that reflect the culture of these women
  • Extensive annotated bibliography of recommended readings covering legal issues, ethnic groups, customs, and novels set during the era
  • Sidebars highlighting interesting experiences of early American women

Dentro del libro

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Crítica de los usuarios - Marcar como inapropiado

No real research was done by the author while preparing to write this book. It is essentially a work of fiction. Almost none of it should be taken seriously.

Crítica de los usuarios - Marcar como inapropiado

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Contenido

A
1
B
43
C
61
D
97
E
127
F
137
G
157
H
173
P
295
Q
321
R
327
S
339
T
389
V
409
W
411
Y
433

I
195
J
217
K
223
L
227
M
243
N
289
O
293
Appendix I Household Chores Common to Early American Women
435
Appendix II Documents
441
Bibliography
455
Index
471
About the Author
495
Derechos de autor

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Pasajes populares

Página 261 - ... herself wholly to reading and writing, and had written many books. Her husband, being very loving and tender of her, was loath to grieve her; but he saw his error, when it was too late. For if she had attended her household affairs, and such things as belong to women, and not gone out of her way and calling to meddle in such things as are proper for men, whose minds are stronger, etc., she had kept her wits, and might have improved them usefully and honorably in the place God had set her.
Página 3 - I long to hear that you have declared an independency — and by the way, in the new Code of Laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make, I desire you would Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favourable to them than your ancestors.
Página 166 - I happened soon after to attend one of his sermons, in the course of which I perceived he intended to finish with a collection, and I silently resolved he should get nothing from me. I had in my pocket a handful of copper money, three or four silver dollars, and five pistoles in gold ; as he proceeded I began to soften, and concluded to give the copper.
Página 3 - I long to hear that you have declared an independancy — and by the way in the new Code of Laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make I desire you would Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favourable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could.
Página 10 - It seems to be a bait, the devil lays to make men loose their precious time: I remember with shame, how formerly, when I had taken two or three pipes, I was presently ready for another, such a bewitching thing it is...
Página 91 - By marriage the husband and wife are one person in law ; that is the very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least is incorporated and consolidated into that of the husband ; under whose wing, protection, and cover, she performs everything...
Página 53 - ... surely we. If ever man were lov'd by wife, then thee; If ever wife was happy in a man, Compare with me ye women if you can. I prize thy love more than whole Mines of gold, Or all the riches that the East doth hold. My love is such that Rivers cannot quench, Nor ought but love from thee, give recompence.
Página 335 - Thus the Lord made that pleasant refreshing, which another time would have been an abomination. Then I went home to my mistress's wigwam; and they told me I disgraced my master with begging, and if I did so any more, they would knock me...

Acerca del autor (2004)

Dorothy A. Mays is assistant professor and librarian at Rollins College, Winter Park, FL, specializing in the history of the early modern period.

Información bibliográfica