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the religion of the solitary pillar or the secluded convent, it is false. The second error lies in supposing that you are merely a sensual being, and that you can be happy solely in the gratification of your body. The third fallacy is to think that you are merely intellectual and not spiritual, and that you can live for ever in a Palace of Art.

It remains for us to knit together these three sides of human nature, and to this Tennyson will guide us in "In Memoriam." There the whole man is displayed in right proportion-body, mind, and spirit. All three, seen before as disjointed and one-sided manifestations, are there welded together into one perfect whole. Man rises, in body, mind, and spirit, into the glorious liberty of a child of God, and is seen aspiring to something like "the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ."

IV.

Tennyson.

IN MEMORIAM.

IV.

Tennyson.

IN MEMORIAM.

E have seen in the asceticism of Stylites, and in the conventual devotion

and ecstasy of St. Agnes, what becomes of human nature when considered as nothing but spirit. We have noted the wreck of the body, and the overthrow of the mind. We have seen in the "Vision of Sin" what became of human nature regarded simply as body: the worship of the senses was shown to be, not only the wreck of the body, but the palsy of the soul and the paralysis of the intellect. We have seen in the "Palace of Art" what became of the culture of the body and the mind-the life of the senses, the intellect, and the imagination, apart from the spirit; we noted how nearly the spirit succumbed to that treatment; we assisted at the desperate struggle. But it remained for us to learn what human nature might be when treated as St. Paul

treats it, in body, mind, and spirit. The isolated elements combine at last to make the whole man— the sublime humanity as conceived by God-like God Himself, tripartite and triune.

This is the lesson of the "In Memoriam:" the developed humanity stands forth at last, disciplined by loss, purified by suffering, and lifted up into heavenly places through the earth-born love.

In the "In Memoriam" you have a man who thrills and kindles to all outward impressions ; his senses are keenly alive to every change of the seasons, to all external nature, to every pulse of pleasure and pain; his mind is alert-" who loves not knowledge? who shall rail against her beauty?" his affections are active—they cannot always acquiesce in purely intellectual speculation, the heart stands up and answers, "I have felt;" and above all there is the brooding sense of the infinite mystery about us, and the longing for the infinite love, and the inspired eye which looks through nature up to nature's God-that God who ever lives and loves-" one God, one law, one element, and one far off Divine event, to which the whole creation moves."

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