Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

OR,

AN INTRODUCTION

TO THE

STUDY OF GEOGRAPHY

ON THE PRINCIPLES OF

CLASSIFICATION AND COMPARISON,

WITH MAPS AND ILLUSTRATIONS.

201.

BY

ROBERT SULLIVAN, LL.D., T.C.D.

BARRISTER-AT-LAW, &C.

EDITED BY THE

REV. SAMUEL HAUGHTON, M.D. DUBL., D.C.L. OXON.

FELLOW OF TRINITY COLLEGE,

AND PROFESSOR OF GEOLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF DUBLIN.

SIXTY-FIFTH EDITION, REVISED.

DUBLIN: SULLIVAN, BROTHERS.

LONDON: LONGMANS AND CO.; SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, AND CO.;
HAMILTON, ADAMS, AND CO. EDINBURGH: JOHN MENZIES AND CO.
MELBOURNE AND ADELAIDE: GEORGE ROBERTSON.

SYDNEY; J. J. MOORE.

[blocks in formation]

OXFORD

Printed by ALEX. THOM & Co., 87, 88, & 89, Abbey-street, Dublin The Queen's Printing Office.

PREFACE.

FIRST EDITION.

THIS little work is, as its title imports, an INTRODUCTION to the study of GEOGRAPHY. It will, however, be found to contain much more information upon this important and interesting branch of education than is usually met with in much larger volumes. This is entirely owing to the PLAN upon which it has been drawn up. Instead of dividing the attention, and oppressing the memory of the young student, by obliging him to learn and recollect the unconnected facts and innumerable details with which this, the most extensive of all the sciences, abounds, the essential facts and leading principles have been presented to his view under general and separate heads. In this way, he learns with ease, and recollects without effort, the general and fundamental principles of the science; and having thus fixed in his mind a clear and connected outline of the whole subject, he will be able to fill it up as he proceeds, not only without difficulty, but with pleasure.

As the PLAN of this work, and the advantages resulting from it, are fully developed in the ARTICLE headed "METHOD OF TEACHING GEOGRAPHY," page 7, the reader is respectfully requested to peruse it before he proceeds farther. To the Teacher of Geography this article is especially recommended. In fact, it is to him the most important part of the work.

It may appear strange that so large a portion of so small a treatise should be devoted to the mathematical part of Geography; but as the writer is convinced, that there can beno rational, and therefore no real knowledge of Geography,. without clear and correct ideas of the FORM, MAGNITUDE, and MOTIONS of the earth, he determined to meet these dif ficulties in the outset, and to do every thing in his power not only to make them intelligible, but also easy and interesting to the youthful intellect.

Besides, the INTELLECTUAL method of teaching, now happily introduced into every good school in the country, requires the pupils to have a rational knowledge of every thing. in which they are instructed.

« AnteriorContinuar »