Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Portada
Book Sales, Incorporated, 2001 - 224 páginas
This collection contains poems Elizabeth Browning wrote in her early days as well as the last poems she wrote before her death at 55: ballads, religious, social-reforming, and political verse. Included are: "The Dream," "The Image of God," "A Sea-Side Meditation," "The Tempest," "Night and the Merry Man," "The Romaunt of Margret," "The Romance of the Ganges," "The Lost Bower," "Rime of the Duchess May," "Catarina to Camoens," "The Romance of the Swan's Nest," "A Man's Requirements," "A Woman's Shortcomings," "A Curse Before a Nation," "Christmas Gifts," "My Heart and I," "A Musical Instrument," and several others, all of which demonstrate Browning's astonishing versatility and mastery of the English language

Contenido

Bereavement
13
Man and Nature
19
Stanzas
30
Adequacy
43
Futurity
49
The Look
53
The Two Sayings
66
The Ladys Yes
83
Flush or Faunus
96
Hiram Powers Greek Slave 886
98
Life and Love
111
Christmas Gifts
177
The Best Thing in the World
191
Derechos de autor

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Acerca del autor (2001)

Elizabeth Barrett was born in Coxhoe Hall, Durham, England, in 1806. Most of her childhood was spent on her father's estate, reading the classics and writing poetry. An injury to her spine when she was fifteen, the shock of her brother's death by drowning in 1840 and an ogre-like father made her life dark. But she read and wrote, and no little volume of verse ever produced a richer return than her Poems of 1844. Robert Browning read the poems, liked them, and came to her rescue like Prince Charming in the fairy story. Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning were married on September 12, 1846. Barrett Browning's enduring fame has rested on two works-Poems (1850), containing Sonnets from the Portuguese, and Aurora Leigh (1857). The former is a celebration of woman as man's other half and the latter is a celebration of woman's potential to stand on her own. During the Edwardian and later periods, it was Sonnets from the Portuguese that embodied Barrett Browning. Since the rise of feminism, it has been Aurora Leigh. More recently, a third side of Barrett Browning has been revealed: the incisive critical and political commentator, seen in her letters. Elizabeth Barrett Browning died in Florence, Italy, in 1861.

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