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PLAN NO. 9.-FRONT PERSPECTIVE, WITH GROUNDS, &C.-FIG. I.

This building in the plan is agreably situated, and the grounds are secluded and well planted. It also stands back from the highway, and is thus free from noise and dust. The building is 40 feet long by 25 wide, and 12 feet high in the clear.

The school room is calculated to accommodate 64 pupils, with seats and desks each for two pupils, and arranged as in figure 2.

The yards and entrance for the boys and girls are entirely separate, and each is appropriately fitted up with scraper, mats, broom, water-pails, sink, hooks and shelves.

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A. Front Entrance.

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| D. Teacher's platform.

B. Girls' entrance and lobby, fitted up with L. Cases for library.

mats, scrapers, hooks and shelves. 0. Boys' entrance, ditto.

E. Closets for apparatus, &c.

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PLAN NO. 10.-END AND SIDE PERSPECTIVE, WITH GROUND, ETC.-FIG. I. This design is in the pointed style of architecture. Any rectangular plan will suit it; and the principles of light and ventilation may be fully carried out 'in this as in other plans. The principal light is from one large mullioned window in the rear end. The openings side are for air in summer, not glazed, but closed with light shutters. The ventilator, as shown on the ridge of the roof of the building, may be of any required size, say 2 ft. wide and 12 in. high, sliding up and down between the stove pipe and the outward case, forming a cap to exclude water. This cap may be pushed up or let down by a rod affixed to the under edge, and lying against the smoke pipe. Height may be gained in the roof by framing with collar beams set up 4 or 5 feet above the The sides, if not of brick or stone, may be boarded vertically, as seen in the engraving.

eaves.

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PART III.-SCHOOL SITES, LANDSCAPE, TREES,

SHRUBBERIES, &c.

On page 10 of this work, we introduced some remarks on the proper sites of schoolhouses, and the various kinds of flowers, shrubs, and trees with which the schoolgrounds ought to be ornamented, and which can easily be procured in this countrythey being indigenous to our soil and climate.

The perspective of school-house, out-buildings, and grounds, on next page, furnishes another and a beautiful illustration of what we would recommend on this subject. The size of school lots must, in somemeasure, be determined by the facility with which land in desirable situations can be obtained. In country places, and in many towns and villages, school lots of at least half or quarter of an acre each, can be easily procured. But in all cases, whether the grounds be large or small, they ought to be laid out and prepared with a view to both convenience and taste. Every thing around, as well as within a school-house should be attractive to the eye and improving to the taste of the pupils. It is in connexion with the school-house that they receive many of their earliest and most durable impressions. Those impressions should be on the side of

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PLAN No. 1.-PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF SCHOOL-HOUSE, OUTBUILDINGS, AND GROUNDS.-(Adapted to Plan No. 1, on page 39.)

neatness, virtue and cheerfulness. This is not likely to be the case where the site of the school-house is in a noisy, dirty thoroughfare of the city, or in a low, damp, or bleak, unsheltered place in the country; nor if all attraction to comfort and decency be neglected in the internal furniture and out-door arrangements of the house itself. How different

will be the associations, impressions, and feelings of a pupil where the house and grounds are provided as represented in the above engraving, from those of a pupil attending school where the house is dirty and comfortless, where the play-grounds are the highway or the street, and where indecencies are almost imposed as a necessity from the absence of the requisite provisions against them.

In the engraving, it will be observed that the situation is represented as retired, dry, and pleasant; that the ground is made smooth, and sown with grass, planted with shady trees, tastefully arranged in groups, and round the sides, and protected by a neat and substantial inclosure. In the rear of the building the yard is divided by a high and close fence; each portion appropriately fitted up and provided with suitable conveniences,

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