Domestic anecdotes, with moral reflections

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Francis Westley, 1825 - 296 páginas

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Página 187 - Since trifles make the sum of human things, And half our misery from our foibles springs ; Since life's best joys consist in peace and ease, And though but few can serve, yet all may please; O let the ungentle spirit learn from hence, A small unkindness is a great offence.
Página 187 - Oh ! let th' ungentle spirit learn from hence, A small unkindness is a great offence. Large bounties to bestow we wish in vain ; But all may shun the guilt of giving pain. To bless mankind with tides of flowing wealth, With power to grace them, or to crown with health, Our little lots denies ; but heaven decrees To all the gift of ministering to ease.
Página 187 - A small unkindness is a great offence. Large bounties to bestow, we wish in vain ; But all may shun the guilt of giving pain. To bless mankind with tides of flowing wealth, With power to grace them, or to crown with health, Our little lot denies ; but Heaven decrees To all, the gift of ministering to ease. The gentle offices of patient love, Beyond all flattery, and all price above ; The mild forbearance of another's fault ; The taunting word suppressed as soon as thought ; On these Heaven bade the...
Página 257 - We are long before we are convinced that happiness is never to be found; and each believes it possessed by others to keep alive the hope of obtaining it for himself.
Página 133 - The ways of Heaven are dark and intricate, Puzzled in mazes, and perplexed with errors, Our understanding traces them in vain, Lost and bewildered in the fruitless search; Nor sees with how much art the windings run, Nor where the regular confusion ends.
Página 175 - Ep. ii. ?<-.*For what's derided by the censuring crowd, Is thought on more than what is just and good. DRYDEN. There is a lust in man no power can tame, Of loudly publishing his neighbour's shame ; On eagle's wings invidious scandals fly, While virtuous actions are but born, and die.
Página 73 - ... the passion they have inspired occasions it ; and in that case they adopt the notion, that Silence in love betrays more woe Than words, though ne'er so witty : The beggar that is dumb, we know, Deserves a double pity.
Página 203 - ... vexation and disappointment, of which he was unwilling there should be any witness, he revolved in his mind all the pleasures and honours of supreme dominion which had now suddenly been snatched from him, with a degree of anguish and regret, not proportioned to their real, but their imaginary value. Of future good, that which we obtain is found to be less than our expectations; but that of which we are disappointed, we suppose would have been more: thus do the children of hope extract evil, both...
Página 210 - ... up in it, and where an indolent turn of mind, a want of rational avocations, and perhaps of a new object, all contribute to indulge and confirm the disease

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