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A GREAT WORK OF FICTION

SIR

MORTIMER

By MARY JOHNSTON

Author of "To Have and To Hold"

Illustrated by F. C. Yohn. Frontispiece in Color.

Eight other

Pictures in Tints.

It is being

Sir Mortimer is conceded to be the greatest romance Miss Mary John-
ston, author of To Have and To Hold, etc., has written.
exquisitely illustrated by F. C. Yohn, and will be issued in book form in
March. Every indication points to Sir Mortimer as probably one of the
big successes in fiction for 1904. Miss Johnston's immense popularity,
added to the important advantage of the story's serial publication in Harper's
Magazine and the notable beauty and strength of the romance, combine to
insure the book's leadership among this year's fiction. Miss Johnston has
woven her love story around a spirited Elizabethan beauty, a lady-in-waiting
to the Queen, and Sir Mortimer Ferne, an officer in Her Majesty's navy.
This novel was announced for publication in 1903, but was postponed, owing
to the indisposition of Miss Johnston. The delay has resulted in much
additional advertising of the story and an even keener public interest in
its appearance.

Ornamented Cloth, Gilt Top, $1.50

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THE STORY OF A SOLDIER'S

LIFE

By FIELD MARSHAL VISCOUNT WOLSELEY, O.M., K.P., G.C.B., G.C.M.G., D.C.L., LL.D.

The Canadian rights for Lord Wolsley's two-volume memoirs have been secured by THE BOOK SUPPLY COMPANY, LIMITED, Toronto, who will publish in March a handsome Canadian edition with gilt top and uncut edges.

The story begins with a description of the part he took as an "ensign" in the Burmese War of 1852-3. In

Wolseley

that campaign he led two storming parties, in the latter of which he received his first severe wound, a wound which very nearly proved fatal. Sen: home to recover, he joined the 90th Light Infantry as a lieutenant in Dublin in 1854, where he embarked for the Crimea in November of that year. He describes the hardships endured by the private soldiers in the winter of 1854-5, and he gives graphic accounts of sorties and of numerous acts of daring done by officers an men. He writes

freely of the incapable generals and useless Staff officers, but whilst he decries the value of many who were highly placed, he is unbounded in his praise of those officers who thoroughly knew their work and did it well. He describes outlying picket duty; and life in the trenches during the miseries of that first winter; but all his sympathy is for the rank and file, he has none for himself, nor for any of the officers around him. Appointed to be Assistant Engineer in the trenches he tells of the building of batteries, the repair f embrazures during the heavy bombardments, and is loud in praise of those whose acts of courage he evidently loves to describe, Captain Peel of the navy being of their number.

At the taking of the Quarries he had a night of prolonged fighting. In the morning he was found asleep amongst the dead, who had been collected behind that work. But only exhausted from over fatigue during the night, when he was roused up, he struggled back to camp.

The serious repulse sustained by the English and French armies on Waterloo Day, 1855, is fully described, also the sortie on August 29, at the close of which he was very severely wounded. As soon as he was again fit for work, he was appointed to the Staff, and describes his work in the Baidar Valley until the winter set in. Transferred next to the Staff of the Light Division, he worked with it until peace was proclaimed.

Being about the last man to leave the Crimea, he returned home and rejoined his battalion at Aldershot, then recently created as a Camp of Instruction. He describes the efforts of officers to rid their regiments of others who were a disgrace to it, and deals with the question of "ragging." Thence he went to Portsmouth where he subsequently embarked for China in H.M.S. Transit. Wrecked in that ill-fated ship on the island of Banca, he and his company were taken in a man-ofwar to Singapore, whence he was sent in hot haste to India, where the great mutiny of the Bengal army had recently taken place; hastening up country he reached Cawnpore and bivouacked on the night of his arriva round the house where the English women and children: had been so recently massacred. It was a horrible spectacle. Whilst at Cawnpore he saw some fighting in that neighborhood close to Bithoor, where stood the residence of the Nana Sahib. Thence he marched into Oudh, and was besieged in the Alum Bagh until Sir Colin Campbell arrived with a strong force to relieve the garrison besieged in Lucknow. His company led the advance upon the Secunder Bagh, the day it was stormed by the 43rd Highlanders and Wilde's Sikhs. The next day his company stormed the Mess House, took

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A REAL ROMANCE

Ready about March 1st.

"All's Fair in Love"

BY JOSEPHINE CAROLINE SAWYER

Author of "EVERY INCH A KING."

HE popularity of Miss Sawyer's first book, "Every Inch a King," ensures a favorable hearing for her

THE

Love." Like new second story, "All's Fair in Love." Like its predecessor, Miss Sawyer's new book is first of all a

love story. A girl who is betrothed to one of two inseparable friends, loves the other; and while knowing that she is loved devotedly by both, she contrives to keep her secret so that it is unguessed by either of them, until the climax of the story is reached. Add to this that the scene is laid on the Scottish border in the warlike days of old; and that the personages are from the families of Douglas, Percy and Neville, among whom the slightest indiscretion on the part of the maid would have brought on a bloody war; and you have a story that for audacity of plot and terseness of interest can hardly be surpassed.

Eight Full Page Illustrations in Colors.

12 mo. Cloth, Gilt, $1.50.

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TORONTO

possession of Motee Mahul and joined hands with a company of his own battalion that had marched with General Havelock into the Lucknow Residency. It was the meeting of these two companies of the 90th Light Infantry in the Motee Mahul that actually constituted Lord Clyde's relief of Lucknow. As soon as the women and children and the splendid garrison besieged in Lucknow had been safely withdrawn from the Residency there, Captain Wolseley's battalion formed part of Sir James Outram's force, that lay encamped at the Alum Bagh in front of Lucknow, whilst Lord Clyde marched back to save General Windham's garrison at Cawnpore. After some time Sir Colin Campbell at the head of a strong army returned to the Alum Bagh, and advancing upon Lucknow took it for good and all. Captain Wolseley was then appointed to the Staff, and had a long and trying campaign in Oudh, under General Sir Hope Grant during the hot weather.

In 1860 the long deferred war with China took place, in which Sir Hope Grant commanded. It ended in the storming of the Taku forts and the march upon and capture of Pekin. It was full of interesting events, which Lord Wolseley relates concisely.

Upon the close of the war, instead of immediately returning home he joined with Sir Hope Grant and a party of officers in hiring a steamer in which they went to Japan before any of its ports were pen to trade. He gives an account of his experiences amongst the Japanese people before any of their old customs or aristocratic system of government had been modernized into their

present matter-of-fact mode of life. He was then sent on a mission up the Yang-tsi-kiang River to report upon the progress made by the Tai-pung rebels. He stayed at their headquarters in Nankin for some time and then proceeded to Hankow, commonly said to be the centre of China. Upon returning home he spent some time in France. Shortly afterwards, what is commonly known as the Trent Affair" was suddenly sprung upon the British nation. The whole country rose in anger as one man at the insult offered to our lag by the captain of an American ship of war. But Mr. Lincoln was too wise a man to embroil himself with any great power especially any great naval power, until he had disposed of the internecine war he had embarked upon. However, the Government thought it necessary even when this war cloud had burst, to dispatch a small division of all arms to Canada, and Colonel Wolseley was sent out with it as a Staff officer. He had a long period of five years in Canada, part of which was renderea extremely interesting by an expedition he undertook to the Southern Confederacy. He had the privilege of paying a visit to General R. Lee's headquarters in Virginia, and he describes in these memoirs what he saw there, and states his opinion of that great general and also of the renowned Stonewall Jackson.

Upon returning to Canada, Colonel Wolseley was employed under General Sir Patrick MacDougall in training the Militia Forces. Shortly afterwards he was sent to the Niagara frontier to engage a Fenian Brigade that had landed in that neighborhood. He then took

command of a camp of Militia on the Welland Canal to protect it against raids then threatened by the Fenans in the United States. Upon the completion of his term of Staff service in Canada, he returned home in the beginning of 1867, but after a few months' stay in England was sent back to British North America, as the Head of the Quarter-Master-General's Department here.

In the winter of 1869-70, political troubles began in the Red River Territory. Its half-breed population refused to receive the Governor lately appointed by the Canadian Ministry, and would not allow him to cross the Pembina frontier. These ignoraut people, swayed by the energy and the little learning of a clever halfbreed named Riel, appointed him President, and renounced all fealty to the British crown. They imprisoned those who dared openly to oppose them, and after a mock trial, shot in cold blood an English Government surveyor. Most unwillingly the Canadian Government thus found themselves compelled to send a brigade of troops to Fort Garry-upon whose site the big city of Winnipeg now stands. The command of the expedition was given to Colonel Wolseley. His narrative describes the rocky and mountainuous country traversed by this brigade for 800 miles, and the many moving accidents by flood and field that befell it. When peace was restored to the district, and Her Majesty's authority once more fully established, he returned home.

Then began a period of hard work on the Staff at that still antiquated institution, "The War Office." Mr. Cardwell determined to reform the army, and bring it up to a level with modern views on military matters.

The great war between France and Germany had just

come to an end. It had proved the danger incurred by any nation that rested content with the reputation of a military position it had obtained in a previous generation. The British army was absolutely behind that of most other nations, and its chiefs, clinging to old traditions, would not realize that fact.

Colonel Wolseley soon became an intimate friend of Mr. Cardwell's and did his best to he'p him in his able endeavors to modernize the army. It was an uphill game, but was won in the teeth of an opposition that emanated from the ignorant old generals, and from that very strong factor in English public affairs, namely, "Society."

Then came the Ashantee War, with the story of which these two volumes close. It was a little but an extremely difficult campaign. The counti; to be traversed was one vast and roadless forest, whose deadly fevers and fatal dysentery made impossible any prolonged stay in them. A graphic description is given of the country which this little army traversed on its march to Koomassee, of the hard fighting encountered on the road, of the destruction of that capital, and of the peace Colonel Wolseley made with its degraded king. All things considered, it was a remarkable war, not only on account of the great natural obstacles to be encountered during its progress, but because its 'uration had been exactly calculated, and its event wisely foreseen and provided for.

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Bishop Fowler, of the Methodist Church, has written the following letter to Senator Beveridge regarding reading your great book on Russian Advance. I have his book, The Russian Advance: "I have just finished enjoyed every page of it. It is elegant in style, using superb and simple English. It is wide in its sweep, taking the great problems of Russian policy and plans. It is minute in its details, avoiding platitudes. It is satisfactory in its selections, presenting the very things one wishes to know. I write this to express my indebtedness to you. I have read quite widely on Russia and China and Japan and Korea. This book of yours is the best of all on Russia."

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