Portraits of Illustrious Personages of Great Britain: Engraved from Authentic Pictures in the Galleries of the Nobility and the Public Collections of the Country. With Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Their Lives and Actions,

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Harding and Lepard., 1835

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Página 6 - I meant the day-star should not brighter rise, Nor lend like influence from his lucent seat. I meant she should be courteous, facile, sweet, Hating that solemn vice of greatness, pride ; I meant each softest virtue there should meet, Fit in that softer bosom to reside. Only a learned, and a manly soul I purposed her : that should, with even powers, The rock, the spindle, and the shears control Of Destiny, and spin her own free hours.
Página 6 - ON LUCY, COUNTESS OF BEDFORD*. This morning, timely rapt with holy fire, I thought to form unto my zealous Muse, What kind of creature I could most desire To honour, serve, and love, as Poets use. I meant to make her fair, and free, and wise, Of greatest blood, and yet more good than great ; I meant the day-star should not brighter rise, Nor lend like influence from his lucent seat. I meant she should be courteous, facile, sweet, Hating that solemn vice of greatness, pride ; I meant each softest...
Página 14 - Then his ascent was so quick, that it seemed rather a flight than a growth; and he was such a darling of fortune, that he was at the top before he was well seen at the bottom; and, as if he had been born a favourite, he was supreme the first month he came to court...
Página 4 - Baldi came to the presencechamber door, he was requested to lay aside his long rapier, — which, Italian-like, he then wore ; — and being entered the chamber, he found there with the king three or four Scotch lords standing distant in several corners of the chamber ; at the sight of whom he made a stand ; which the king observing, bade him be bold and deliver his message ; for he would undertake for the secrecy of all that were present.
Página 14 - ... himself in parliament ; and if they should fall upon him, he being at a distance, whatsoever they should conclude against him he might the better avoid, and retire from any danger, having the liberty of being out of their hands, and to go over to Ireland, or to some other place, where he might be most serviceable to his majesty...
Página 3 - ... to be his enemy. He was a man very well bred, and of excellent parts, and a graceful speaker upon any subject, having a good proportion of learning, and a ready wit to apply it, and enlarge upon it...
Página 3 - If the king suspected their loyalty, he might proceed against them as he thought fit ; but that it was against the law to impose any oath or protestation upon them which were not enjoined by the law ; and, in that respect, that they might not betray the common liberty, they would not submit to it.
Página 5 - He was not only a great favourer of learned and ingenious men, but was himself learned, and endowed to admiration with a poetical geny, as by those amorous and not inelegant aires and poems of his composition doth evidently appear; some of which had musical notes set to them by Hen.
Página 13 - His kindness and affection to his friends was so vehement, that it was as so many marriages for better and worse, and so many leagues offensive and defensive; as if he thought himself obliged to love all his friends, and to make war upon all they were angry with, let the cause be what it would.

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