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Out cam' the gudeman, and high he shouted;
Out cam' the gudewife, and laigh she louted;
And a' the toun-neebors were gather'd about it;
And there lay he, I trow.

Then out cam' I, and sneer'd and smiled:
Ye cam' to woo, but ye're a' beguiled;

Ye've fa'en i' the dirt, and ye're a' befiled:

We'll hae nae mair o' you.

The chorus is repeated at the end of every stanza. The music of this old song is quaint, characteristic, and peculiarly Scottish.

TIBBIE FOWLER.

From Herd's Collection, 1776. Air-"Tibbie Fowler."

TIBBIE Fowler o' the glen,

There's ower many wooin' at her;

Tibbie Fowler o' the glen,

There's ower many wooin' at her.

Wooin' at her, pu'in' at her,

Courtin' her, and canna get her;

Filthy elf! it's for her pelf

That a' the lads are wooin' at her.

Ten cam' east, and ten cam' west,
Ten cam' rowin' o'er the water;
Twa cam' down the lang dyke-side:
There's twa-and-thirty wooin' at her!

There's seven but and seven ben,

Seven i' the pantry wi' her;
Twenty head about the door :
There's ane-and-forty wooin' at her!

She's got pendles in her lugs-
Cockle-shells wad set her better!
High-heel'd shoon and siller tags;

An' a' the lads are wooin' at her!

Be a lassie e'er sae black,

Gin she hae the penny siller,
Set her up on Tintock tap,

The wind will blaw a man till her.

Be a lassie e'er sae fair,

An' she want the penny siller,

A flie may fell her i' the air,

Before a man be even'd till her.

The first two stanzas of this song appeared in Herd's Collection. The song itself is mentioned by Allan Ramsay in the "Tea-Table Miscellany." The authorship has been claimed for the Rev. Dr. Strachan, minister of Carnwater; but he appears to have simply remodelled, and perhaps improved, the old song spoken of by Ramsay.

OUR GUDEMAN CAM' HAME.

ANONYMOUS. Herd's Collection, 1776. Air-" Our gudeman."

OUR gudeman cam' hame at e'en,

And hame cam' he;

And there he saw a saddle-horse

Where nae horse should be.

Oh, how cam' this horse here?

How can this be?

How cam' this horse here

Without the leave o' me?
A horse! quo' she;
Ay, a horse, quo' he.
Ye auld blind dotard carle,
And blinder mat ye be!
It's but a bonnie milk-cow
My mither sent to me.
A milk-cow! quo' he;
Ay, a milk-cow, quo' she.

Far hae I ridden,

And muckle hae I seen;

But a saddle on a milk-cow

Saw I never nane.

Our gudeman cam' hame at e'en,

And hame cam' he;

He spied a pair o' jack-boots

Where nae boots should be. What's this now, gudewife? What's this I see?

How cam' thae boots here

Without the leave o' me?
Boots! quo' she;

Ay, boots, quo' he.
Ye auld blind dotard carle,
And blinder mat ye be!
It's but a pair o' water-stoups
The cooper sent to me.
Water-stoups! quo' he;
Ay, water-stoups, quo' she,

Far hae I ridden,

And muckle hae I seen;
But siller spurs on water-stoups

Saw I never nane.

Our gudeman cam' hame at e'en,
And hame cam' he;

And there he saw a siller sword
Where nae sword should be.
What's this now, gudewife?
What's this I see?

Oh, how cam' this sword here
Without the leave o' me?
A sword! quo' she;
Ay, a sword, quo' he.
Ye auld blind dotard carle,
And blinder mat ye be!
It's but a parridge-spurtle

My minnie sent to me.

A parridge-spurtle, quo' he;
Ay, a parridge-spurtle, quo' she.

Weel, far hae I ridden,

And muckle hae I seen;

But siller-handed parridge-spurtles

Saw I never nane.

Our gudeman cam' hame at e'en,

And hame cam' he ;

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What's this I see?

How cam' this wig here

Without the leave o' me?

A wig! quo' she;
Ay, a wig, quo' he.
Ye auld blind dotard carle,
And blinder mat ye be!
'Tis naething but a clocken-hen
My minnie sent to me.

A clocken-hen! quo' he;
Ay, a clocken-hen, quo' she.

Far hae I ridden,

And muckle hae I seen;

But powder on a clocken-hen

Saw I never nane.

Our gudeman cam' hame at e'en,
And hame cam' he;

And there he saw a muckle coat

Where nae coat should be.

How cam' this coat here?

How can this be?

How cam' this coat here ?

Without the leave o' me?
A coat! quo' she;
Ay, a coat, quo' he.
Ye auld blind dotard carle,

And blinder mat ye be !
It's but a pair o' blankets
My minnie sent to me.
Blankets! quo' he;
Ay, blankets, quo' she.
Far hae I ridden,

And muckle hae I seen;

But buttons upon blankets

Saw I never nane.

Ben gaed our gudeman

And ben gaed he;

And there he spied a sturdy man

Where nae man should be.
How cam' this man here?

How can this be?

How cam' this man here

Without the leave o' me?
A man! quo' she;
Ay, a man, quo' he.

Puir blind body,

And blinder mat ye be!
It's but a new milkin' maid
My mither sent to me.
A maid! quo he;
Ay, a maid, quo' she.

Far hae I ridden,

And muckle hae I seen;

But lang-bearded maidens
Saw I never nane.

This excellent old song has been claimed as English, but its whole character is evidently Scottish. Johnson, the editor of the Musical Museum," recovered the air, which had been lost, from the singing of a barber in Edinburgh, and printed it for the first time in his collection. There is another version with a denouement more suitable to the delicacy of the present age than that commonly sung, and in which the following stanza concludes the story :—

Oh, hame cam' our gudeman at e'en,

An' ben ga'ed he;

An' he saw a muckie man

Where nae man should be.

What's this now, gudewife?
Wha's this I see?

An' how cam' this man here
Without the leave o' me?

A man! quo' she;

Ay, a man, quo' he.

Oh, hooly, hooly, our gudeman!
An' dinna anger'd be;

It's just our cousin Mackintosh
Come frae the North Countrie.

Cousin Mackintosh! quo' he:
Ay, Cousin Mackintosh, quo' she.
Oh, ye'll hae us a' hang'd, gudewife,
I've een eneuch to see;

Ye're hidin' rebels in the house

Without the leave o' me.

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