Medieval and Modern Times: An Introduction to the History of Western Europe from the Dissolution of the Roman Empire to the Opening of the Great War of 1914

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Ginn, 1918 - 777 páginas

Dentro del libro

Contenido

I
117
CHAPTER PAGE 25 The Great Charter and the Beginnings of Parliament
125
Wales and Scotland
128
4
128
The Hundred Years War
132
17
138
POPES AND EMPERORS 28 Origin of the Holy Roman Empire
143
The Church and its Property
146
Powers claimed by the Popes
152
Gregory VII and Emperor Henry IV
153
The Hohenstaufen Emperors and the Popes
158
THE CRUSADES 33 Origin of the Crusades
166
The First Crusade
170
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172
The Religious Orders of the Hospitalers and Templars
174
The Second and Later Crusades
176
Chief Results of the Crusades
178
THE MEDIEVAL CHURCH AT ITS HEIGHT 38 Organization and Powers of the Church
181
The Heretics and the Inquisition
187
The Franciscans and Dominicans
190
Church and State
195
MEDIEVAL TOWNSTHEIR BUSINESS AND BUILDINGS 42 The Towns and Guilds
203
Business in the Later Middle Ages
208
Gothic Architecture
215
The Italian Cities of the Renaissance
222
46
232
BOOKS AND SCIENCE IN THE MIDDLE AGES 47 How the Modern Languages Originated
239
The Troubadours and Chivalry
244
Medieval Science
247
Medieval Universities and Studies
250
Beginnings of Modern Inventions
255
The Art of the Renaissance
264
EMPEROR CHARLES V AND HIS VAST REALMS 53 Emperor Maximilian and the Hapsburg Marriages
268
54
274
Condition of Germany when Charles V became Emperor
280
MARTIN LUTHER AND THE REVOLT OF GERMANY AGAINST THE PAPACY
284
How Martin Luther revolted against the Papacy
288
The Diet at Worms 15201521
299
The Revolt against the Papacy begins in Germany
302
Division of Germany into Catholic and Protestant 299 Countries
306
61
311
How England fell away from the Papacy
314
England becomes Protestant
320
64
325

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Página xv - Our object now, as then, is to vindicate the principles of peace and justice in the life of the world as against selfish and autocratic power and to set up amongst the really free and self-governed peoples of the world such a concert of purpose and of action as will henceforth insure the observance of those principles.
Página 246 - ... the truest lover, of a sinful man, that ever loved woman; and thou wert the kindest man that ever struck with sword. And thou wert the goodliest person that ever came among press of knights. And thou wert the meekest man, and the gentlest, that ever ate in hall among ladies. And thou wert the sternest knight to thy mortal foe that ever put spear in the rest.
Página 382 - Parliament, composed of both houses, was assembled, which welcomed a messenger from the king and solemnly resolved that, " according to the ancient and fundamental laws of this kingdom, the government is, and ought to be, by king, lords, and commons.
Página 102 - Luther's time (1524-1525), and it was not until the beginning of the nineteenth century that the serfs were freed in Prussia.
Página 246 - And now, I dare say,' said Sir Bors, ' thou Sir Launcelot, there thou liest, that thou wert never matched of earthly knight's hands; and thou wert the courtliest knight that ever bare shield; and thou wert the truest friend to thy lover that ever bestrode horse; and thou wert the truest lover of a sinful man that ever loved woman; and thou wert the kindest man that ever...
Página 18 - He can no longer have God for his Father, who has not the Church for his mother.
Página 501 - The free communication of ideas and opinions is one of the most precious of the rights of man. Every citizen may, accordingly, speak, write, and print with freedom, but shall be responsible for such abuses of this freedom as shall be defined by law.
Página 366 - that is no subject for the tongue of a lawyer, nor is it lawful to be disputed. It is atheism and blasphemy to dispute what God can do : good Christians content themselves with His will revealed in His word ; so it is presumption and high contempt in a subject to dispute what a king can do, or say that a king cannot do this or that ; but rest in that which is the king's will revealed in his law.
Página xxxii - No peace can last, or ought to last, which does not recognize and accept the principle that governments derive all their just powers from the consent of the governed, and that no right anywhere exists to hand peoples about from sovereignty to sovereignty as if they were property.
Página 656 - I am told that no Chancellor of the Exchequer has ever been called on to impose such heavy taxes in a time of peace. This, Mr Emmott, is a war budget. It is for raising money to wage implacable warfare against poverty and squalidness. I cannot help hoping and believing that before this generation has passed away we shall have advanced a great step towards that good time when poverty and wretchedness and human degradation which always follow in its camp will be as remote to the people of this country...

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