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APPENDIX III.

31 Stat. L., p. 1881.

Protocol of agreement extending, as to the Philippine Islands, for March 29, 1900. six months from April 11, 1900, the period fixed in Article IX of the Treaty of Peace between the United States and Spain, signed at Paris December 10, 1898, during which Spanish subPhilippine Isjects, natives of the Peninsula, may declare their intention to re- lands, registratain their Spanish nationality. Signed at Washington, March tion of Spanish subjects in. 29, 1900; advice and consent of the Senate, April 27, 1900; proclaimed, April 28, 1900.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas a protocol of agreement extending, as to the Philippine Islands, for six months from April 11, 1900, the period fixed in Article IX of the Treaty of Peace between the United States and Spain, signed at Paris on the tenth day of December, 1898, during which Spanish subjects, natives of the Peninsula, may declare before a court of record their intention to retain their Spanish nationality, was signed at Washington on March 29, 1900, by the Honorable John Hay, Secretary of State of the United States, and the Duke de Arcos, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of Spain at Washington, the original of which protocol of agreement being in the English and Spanish languages, is word for word as follows:

Whereas by the ninth Article of the Treaty of Peace between the United States of America and the Kingdom of Spain, signed at Paris on December 10, 1898, it was stipulated and agreed that Spanish subjects, natives of the Peninsula, remaining in the territory over which Spain by Articles I and II of the said treaty relinquished or ceded her sovereignty could preserve their allegiance to the Crown of Spain by making before a court of record within a year from the date of the exchange of ratifications of said treaty, a declaration of their decision to preserve such allegiance; And whereas the two High Contracting Parties are desirous of extending the time within which such declaration may be made by Spanish subjects, natives of the Peninsula, remaining in the Philippine Islands;

The undersigned Plenipotentiaries, in virtue of their full powers, have agreed upon and concluded the following article:

SOLE ARTICLE.

Preamble.

Time extend

The period fixed in Article IX of the Treaty of Peace between the United States and Spain, signed at Paris on the tenth day of ed to Spanish subjects for December, 1898, during which Spanish subjects, natives of the declaration of Peninsula, may declare before a court of record their intention intention to retain Spanish to retain their Spanish nationality, is extended as to the Philipnationality. pine Islands for six months beginning April 11, 1900.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and have thereunto affixed their seals.

Done in duplicate at Washington the 29th day of March, in the year of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred.

[SEAL]

[SEAL]

JOHN HAY.
ARCOS.

Signatures.

Proclama

tion.

And whereas the Senate of the United States, by its resolution of April 27, 1900, (two-thirds of the Senators present concurring therein,) did advise and consent to the proclamation of the said protocol of agreement:

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States of America, have caused the said protocol of agreement to be made public to the end that every article and clause thereof may be observed in good faith by the United States and the citizens thereof.

In testimony whereof, I have set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be hereunto affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fourth.

[SEAL.]

By the President:

JOHN HAY,

Secretary of State.

'WILLIAM MCKINLEY.

1

APPENDIX IV.

Treaty between the United States and Spain for the cession to November 7, the United States of any and all islands of the Philippine 1900. archipelago lying outside of the lines described in Article III 31 Stat. L., p. of the treaty of peace of December 10, 1898. Signed at Wash- 1942. ington November 7, 1900; ratification advised by the Senate Cession of January 22, 1901; ratified by the President January 30, 1901; lands. of outlying ratified by Spain February 25, 1901; ratifications exchanged at Philippines. Washington March 23, 190; proclaimed March 23, 1901.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas a Convention between the United States of America and Spain, providing for the cession to the United States of any and all islands of the Philippine Archipelago lying outside of the lines described in Article III of the Treaty of Peace concluded by them at Paris on December 10, 1898, was concluded and signed by their respective plenipotentiaries at the City of Washington on the seventh day of November, 1900, which Convention, being in the English and Spanish languages, is word for word as follows:

The United States of America and Her Majesty the Queen Regent of Spain, in the name of Her August Son, Don Alfonso XIII, desiring to remove any ground of misunderstanding growing out of the interpretation of Article III of the Treaty of Peace concluded between them at Paris the tenth day of December, one thousand eight hundred and ninety eight, whereby Spain cedes to the United States the archipelago known as the Philippine Islands and comprehending the islands lying within certain described lines, and having resolved to conclude a Treaty to accomplish that end, have for that purpose appointed as their respective plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States, John Hay, Secretary of State of the United States;

and Her Majesty the Queen Regent of Spain, the Duke de Arcos, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of Spain to the United States;

who, having met in the city of Washington and having exchanged their full powers, which were found to be in due and proper form, have agreed upon the following sole article:

SOLE ARTICLE.

Spain relinquishes to the United States all title and claim of title, which she may have had at the time of the conclusion of the Treaty of Peace of Paris, to any and all islands belonging to the Philippine Archipelago, lying outside the lines described in Article III of that Treaty and particularly to the islands of Cagayan Sulú and Sibutú and their dependencies, and agrees that all such islands shall be comprehended in the cession of the Archipelago as fully as if they had been expressly included within those lines.

Vol.

1754.

is the

30, p.

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Considera

The United States, in consideration of this relinquishment, will pay to Spain the sum of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) tion. within six months after the exchange of the ratifications of the present Treaty.

Ratification.

Signatures.

Proclama

tion.

The present Treaty shall be ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by Her Majesty the Queen Regent of Spain, after approval by the Cortes of the Kingdom, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as possible.

In faith whereof, we, the respective Plenipotentiaries, have signed this Treaty and have hereunto affixed our seals.

Done in duplicate at the city of Washington, the 7th day of November, in the year of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred. [SEAL] JOHN HAY. [SEAL] ARCOS.

And whereas the said Convention has been duly ratified on both parts, and the ratifications of the two Governments were exchanged in the city of Washington on the twenty-third day of March, one thousand nine hundred and one;

Now, therefore, be it known that I, William McKinley, President of the United States of America, have caused the said Convention to be made public, to the end that the same and every article and clause thereof may be observed and fulfilled with good faith by the United States and the citizens thereof.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this 23rd day of March, in the year of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred and one, [SEAL] and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and tewnty-fifth.

By the President:

JOHN HAY,

Secretary of State.

WILLIAM MCKINLEY.

APPENDIX V.

INSTRUCTIONS OF THE PRESIDENT.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, April 7, 1900.

SIR: I transmit to you herewith the instructions of the President for the guidance of yourself and your associates as Commissioners to the Philippine Islands.

Very respectfully,

Hon. WILLIAM H. TAFT,

ELIHU ROOT,
Secretary of War.

President Board of Commissioners

to the Philippine Islands.

Transmittal.

The SECRETARY OF WAR,

EXECUTIVE MANSION, April 7, 1900.

Washington.

su

SIR: In the message transmitted to the Congress on the 5th of December, 1899, I said, speaking of the Philippine Islands: "As long as the insurrection continues the military arm must neces- Military preme during sarily be supreme. But there is no reason why steps should not be insurrection. taken from time to time to inaugurate governments essentially popular in their form as fast as territory is held and controlled by our troops. To this end I am considering the advisability of the return of the commission, or such of the members thereof as can be secured, to aid the existing authorities and facilitate this work throughout the islands."

Return of the commission.

To give effect to the intention thus expressed, I have appointed Hon. William H. Taft, of Ohio; Prof. Dean C. Worcester, of Michigan; Hon. Luke E. Wright, of Tennessee; Hon. Henry C. Ide, of commissionAppointment of Vermont, and Prof. Bernard Moses, of California, commission- ers. ers to the Philippine Islands to continue and perfect the work of organizing and establishing civil government already commenced by the military authorities, subject in all respects to any laws which Congress may hereafter enact.

Commission

The commissioners named will meet and act as a board, and the Hon. William H. Taft is designated as president of the board. ers to act as a It is probable that the transfer of authority from military com- board. manders to civil officers will be gradual and will occupy a con- Transfer of siderable period. Its successful accomplishment and the main- authority. tenance of peace and order in the meantime will require the most perfect cooperation between the civil and military authorities in the island, and both should be directed during the transition period by the same executive department. The commission will Reports to therefore report to the Secretary of War, and all their action will Secretary be subject to your approval and control.

Cooperation.

War.

Proceed Manila.

of

to

Communicate

You will instruct the commission to proceed to the city of Manila, where they will make their principal office, and to communicate with the military governor of the Philippine Islands, whom you will at the same time direct to render to them every with military assistance within his power in the performance of their duties. governor. Without hampering them by too specific instructions, they should in general be enjoined, after making themselves familiar with the conditions and needs of the country, to devote their attention in

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