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Charles Francis, Jr., in 1856, Henry in 1858, and Brooks in 1870. In the fourth generation, the three sons of John Quincy Adams, 1853, are all graduates; George Casper in 1886; Charles Francis, 2d, in 1888, and Arthur in 1899. Two sons of Charles Francis Adams, 1856, have also graduated: Henry and John, in 1898.

Honors for President Eliot: From Tulane University, the degree of LL.D.; from the Emperor of Japan, the Order of the Rising Sun; from the Emperor of Germany, the Order of the Prussian Crown; from Pres. Taft, the nomination as Ambassador to Great Britain.

· Class Day Tickets. The 1909 Class Day Committee make the following announcement: "Graduates may apply up to 6 P. M. June 12 for any part of 15 Yard tickets at 35 cents each; 5 Stadium tickets at $1.50; and 5 Memorial Hall tickets at $1. Money order or check, with 10 cents in stamps for registry fee, must accompany applications. An additional sale will be held for Graduates at 50 State St., on June 23 from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M.; at the '77 Lodge Gate on June 24 after the Yale Game; and at the same gate on Class Day Morning."

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- The Stadium. The work of completing the Stadium, which is now being carried forward under the supervision of Prof. I. N. Hollis, will follow in general the plans of the original design. A canopy, which will run the whole perimeter of the structure, will be built over the highest promenade. This canopy will have the appearance, from outside the Stadium, of another tier of windows, square in shape, in the same vertical line with the present lower rows. An elaborate cornice will surmount the openings. On this, in turn, a parapet wall will be constructed. In all, the new work will

add about 20 feet to the height of the Stadium. From the inside the additions will have the appearance of a Doric colon

nade of 124 circular columns with typical Doric bases and capitals. These columns will be surmounted by heavy beams and a cornice. The line of columns will terminate at each end in a tower similar in plan to those now in existence. The roof of the canopy will be of concrete slabs. A fourth improvement will be the construction on the ground of three concrete steps around the outer perimeter of the Stadium. The enclosure thus formed will be filled in until a new level has been established to correspond to the height of the steps. The work, which will not be complete until the first part of August, will be temporarily discontinued during Class Day week to allow the customary ceremonies to take place.

Candidates for Overseers. The Standing Committee on the Nomination of Overseers, about May 1 sent out the list of candidates for the Board of Overseers, to be balloted on by the Alumni. This year at Commencement Day there are six vacancies on the Board to be filled; five for the full term of six years, and one for the term of two years. The names of the twelve candidates, from the list of twenty given below, receiving the highest number of votes on the postal ballot will be placed on the official Australian ballot for use in the election on Commencement Day, June 30. If anybody entitled to vote for Overseers does not receive his ballot, he should communicate with the Secretary of the Committee, Malcolm Donald, 84 State St., Boston, or with the Harvard Alumni Association, 50 State St., Boston. The list of the candidates follows:

William L. Richardson, '64, of Boston, Professor of Obstetrics, Emeritus, formerly Dean of the Faculty of Medicine.

Leverett S. Tuckerman, '68, of Boston. George E. Bird, '69, of Portland, Asso

ciate Justice of the Supreme Court of

Maine.

Horatio A. Lamb, '71, of Milton. James F. Jackson, '73, of Brookline,

formerly mayor of Fall River, and chairman of the Mass. Railroad Commission. George Wigglesworth, '74, of Milton. William Farnsworth, '77, of Dedham. Francis J. Swayze, '79, of Newark, N. J., Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey.

Charles G. Washburn, '80, of Worcester, Representative in Congress of the Third Mass. District.

Howard Elliott, '81, of St. Paul, Minn., president of the Northern Pacific Ry. Joseph Lee, '83, of Boston.

consisting of Jacob Reighard, chairman, C. B. Davenport, and H. B. Ward, secy.treas. Circular letters were sent out February, June, and December, 1902, and April and December, 1903, to all of Dr. Mark's former students. The volume was somewhat delayed by various matters, especially the preparation of illustrations which were of an unusually attractive type, and it was not finished until late in 1903. The volume con

Lawrence E. Sexton, '84, of New York, tained 25 articles, and a total of 500 N. Y.

Robert S. Gorham, '85, of Newton. Oliver Ames, '86, of North Easton. Henry W. Keyes, '87, of Haverhill,

N. H.

Ezra R. Thayer, '88, of Boston.

J. Pierpont Morgan, Jr., '89, of New York, N. Y.

Russell G. Fessenden, '90, of Boston. Eliot Wadsworth, '98, of Boston. J. Wells Farley, '99, of Boston, formerly secretary and assistant counsel of the Boston Finance Commission.

The Mark Volume. In 1901 it was proposed to issue an anniversary volume to celebrate the completion of twentyfive years of successful work for the development of American Zoology by Edward Laurens Mark, Hersey Professor of Anatomy at Harvard University. At a meeting of his students there was appointed a committee of management consisting of the following persons: C. B. Davenport, Univ. of Chicago; C. H. Eigenmann, Univ. of Indiana; H. H. Field, Concilium Bibliographicum; Seitaro Goto, First High School, Tokyo, Japan; W. A. Lacy, Northwestern Univ.; G. S. Miller, U. S. National Museum; Margaret L. Nickerson, Univ. of Minnesota; Jacob Reighard, Univ. of Michigan; W. E. Ritter, Univ. of California; H. B. Ward, Univ. of Nebraska. This committee was instructed to carry out the plan the details of which were submitted in turn to an executive committee

pages and 36 plates. A photogravure of Dr. Mark was used as frontispiece and was followed by a congratulatory address signed by his students participating in the gift. The high character of the work is evidenced by the appreciative reviews given in Nature, Science, The American Naturalist, Biologisches Centralblatt, and other journals. The Harvard Graduates' Magazine (13:52, September, 1904) speaks of it as "a remarkable tribute, of which the whole University should feel proud." The volumes were all disposed of and all obligations of the committee met a year ago. Since then an auditing committee has gone over the detailed report submitted with vouchers showing the following receipts and expenditures given here in summary form: Received from subscriptions, $1341.45; from sale of volumes, $1600.97; $2942.42. Paid out for printing volumes and plates, $2380.56; for announcements, postage, express, etc., $316.15; for interest on loans, $161.50; for clerical help and sundries, $84.21 : $2942.42. The auditing committee, consisting of S. Henshaw, W. E. Castle, G. H. Parker, and H. W. Rand, reports that they have examined the accounts and papers of Henry B. Ward, Treasurer, and found the same correct, with proper vouchers for all payments. With the publication of this formal statement the responsibility of the committee ceases and its work

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The Annual Statement of the Treasurer, C. F. Adams, 2d, '88, covers the fiscal year ending July 31, 1908. The net income on general investments was 5.05 per cent, a gain of .14 per cent over 1906–07. The General Investments (principal) were valued at $17,466,576.33; the special investments at $2,803,416.15; total $20,269,992.48, as against $19,892,649.92 last year. The income from investments was $953,232.28. Gifts for capital account, $449,972.53; gifts for immediate use, $241,924.23; total gifts, $691,896.76. The receipts from students — tuition, laboratory, matriculation and other fees were $693,388.18.

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This year, for the first time in the history of the University, administrative expenses and others incurred for the benefit of the University as a whole have been distributed amongst its departments. This course was determined upon by the President and Fellows on Feb. 11, 1907, when it was

above expenses this year has been to transfer from the University account, to accounts not included in the College and Library, payments amounting to $20,985.22. The combined accounts of the University, College and Library, after this distribution, show a surplus of $6152.44. If the distribution had not been made they would have shown a deficit of $14,832.78.

All the other departments, except the Stillman Infirmary, were able to meet this new "University charge.” The Stillman Infirmary had to apply all its accumulated income towards meeting current expenses this year. Of the other departments, the only ones which had to meet the new charge from accumulated income, or from gifts, were the Divinity School, the Dental School, the Arnold Arboretum and the Observatory. The amount of the "University charge to each department is as follows: University, $24,324.13; College, $60,202.34; Library, $1863.44; Divinity School, $2181.92; Law School, $7165.07; Medical School, $5583.09; Dental School, $612.87; Bussey Institution, $378.72; Arnold Arboretum, $474.69; Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum, $149.93; Gray Herbarium, $141.66; Observatory, $2310.44; University Museum, $1955.21; Peabody Museum, $1840.57; Semitic Museum, $1796.61; Germanic Museum, $90.19; Fogg Art Museum, $2705.90; Jefferson Physical Laboratory, $238.99; Appleton Chapel, $6713.39; Phillips Brooks House, $1616.78; Hemenway Gymnasium, $277.45; Stillman Infirmary, $1205.35. The University charge, established by the vote quoted above, has been arrived at in each case as follows: From the payments charged to the University account, and shown in the University Table, have been excepted the payments met by income specifically The result of the distribution of the restricted to them.

Voted, that the total net payments entered in the University Table of the Treasurer's Annual Statement be distributed and charged in the year 1907-08 and in each year thereafter, until further order of this Board, substantially in such shares

as may be determined in each year by the application of the method used in a distribution of such payments for 1904-05 submitted to the Board by Allen Danforth, Ex-Comptroller, January 14, 1907. In order that notice of this change might be given to the departments long in advance of its going into effect, the vote was drawn so as not to apply to the year then in progress.

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$1500 to $2000; and 7 at the rate of $2625 to $3333. During the year one of the above persons died, and 5 received retiring allowances for the first time. Of the entire number, 15 began to receive retiring allowances during the last 5 years, 4 during the preceding 5 years, and 1 14 years ago.

Retiring allowances granted, by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, to persons connected with Harvard University, and paid through the Treasurer of the University, amounted during the year to $13,478.38. Retiring allowances paid from the income of the Retiring Allowance Fund, which was established in 1879, amounted to $18,504.01. With retiring allowances PRESIDENTS OF UNIVERSITIES, amounting to $2042.28 paid from current income, the total paid for this purpose was $34,024.67, as compared with $26,462.48 last year. This amount, $34,024.67, was distributed amongst 20 persons, 5 of whom were paid at the rate of $1000 or less; 8 at the rate of

COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS
HOLDING DEGREES IN HARVARD UNI-
VERSITY.

ARIZONA. Tucson, University of Arizona, President: Kendric Charles Babcock, Litt.B. (Univ. of Minnesota) 1889,

A.M. (Harvard) 1895, Ph.D. (ibid.)

1896.

COLORADO. Golden, Colorado School of Mines, President: Victor Clifton Alderson, A.B. (Harvard) 1885, S.D. (Armour Inst. of Tech.) 1903, S.D. Hon. (Beloit) 1903.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. Washington, American University, President: Franklin Elmer Ellsworth Hamilton, A.B. (Harvard) 1887, S.T.B. (Boston Univ.) 1892, Ph.D. (ibid.) 1899, LL.D. (Washington Univ., St. Louis) 1904.

FLORIDA. De Land, John B. Stetson University, President: Lincoln Hulley, A.B. (Bucknell Univ.) 1888, A.B. (Harvard) 1889, A.M. (Bucknell Univ.) 1895, Ph.D. (Univ. of Chicago) 1895, Litt.D. (Stetson Univ.) 1907.

FLORIDA. Gainesville, University of Florida, President: Andrew Sledd, A.M. (Randolph-Macon Coll.) 1894, A.M. (Harvard) 1896, Ph.D. (Yale) 1903, LL.D. (Univ. of South Carolina) 1903.

ILLINOIS. Lebanon, McKendree College, President: McKendree Hypes Chamberlin, A.B. (McKendree Coll.) 1859. LL.B. (Harvard) 1861.

ILLINOIS. Lincoln, Lincoln College, President: James Henry McMurray, A.B. (Oberlin) 1897, A.M. (Harvard) 1901.

INDIANA. Goshen, Goshen College, President: Noah Ebersole Byers, S.B. (Northwestern Univ.) 1898, A.M. (Harvard) 1903.

INDIANA. Indianapolis, Butler College, President: Thomas Carr Howe, Ph.B. (Butler Coll.) 1889, A.M. (ibid.) 1893, A.M. (Harvard) 1897, Ph.D. (ibid.) 1899.

MAINE. Brunswick, Bowdoin College, President: William De Witt Hyde, A.B. (Harvard) 1879, (Andover Theol. Sem.) 1882, S.T.D. (Harvard) 1886, LL.D. (Syracuse) 1897.

MASSACHUSETTS. Cambridge, Har

vard University, President: Charles William Eliot, A.B. (Harvard) 1853, A.M. (ibid.) 1856, LL.D. (Williams) 1869, LL.D. (Coll. of New Jersey) 1869, LLD. (Yale) 1870, LL.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1902.

MASSACHUSETTS. Cambridge, Radcliffe College, President: Le Baron Russell Briggs, A.B. (Harvard) 1875, A.M. (ibid.) 1882, LL.D. (ibid.) 1900, LL.D. (Western Reserve Univ.) 1906, Litt.D. (Lafayette Coll.) 1907.

MASSACHUSETTS. Worcester, Clark University, President: Granville Stanley Hall, A.B. (Williams) 1867, A.M. (ibid.) 1871, (Union Theol. Sem., N. Y.) 1871, Ph.D. (Harvard) 1878, LL.D. (Univ. of Michigan) 1887, LL.D. (Williams) 1888, LL.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1902.

MINNESOTA. St. Paul, Hamline University, President: George Herbert Bridgman, A.B. (Darmouth) 1876, M.D. (Harvard) 1881.

MISSOURI. St. Louis, Washington University, Chancellor: David Franklin Houston, A.B. (Univ. of South Carolina) 1887, A.M. (Harvard) 1892, LL.D. (Tulane Univ.) 1903, LL.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin) 1906.

MONTANA. Missoula, University of Montana, President: Clyde Augustus Duniway, A.B. (Cornell) 1892, A.M. (Harvard) 1894, Ph.D. (ibid.) 1897.

NEW YORK. Brooklyn, Institute of Arts and Sciences, Director: Franklin William Hooper, A.B. (Harvard) 1875, A.M. Hon. (ibid.) 1897.

NEW YORK. Brooklyn, Polytechnic Institute, President: Fred Washington Atkinson, A.B. (Harvard) 1890, Ph.D. (Leipsic) 1893.

NORTH CAROLINA. Elon College, Elon College, President: Emmet Leonidas Moffitt, A.B. (Trinity Coll., N.C.) 1889, A.M. (ibid) 1891, A.M. (Harvard)

1893.

OHIO. Cleveland, Adelbert College,

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