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The average of attendance for all duties during the year is 884 per cent.

Company H, First Infantry, had its full complement, officers and men, present at the annual drill; Company K being the smallest, with 48.

In the Second Regiment, Company K had 53 present, Company L having but 37.

Fifth Regiment: The largest company was Company D, with 53, and the smallest company in the regiment, Company G, had 36 present.

Sixth Regiment: Company A had 62, while Company G had the smallest attendance, 37.

Companies G and I, Eighth Regiment, had 61 men each, with the smallest attendance in Company A, 40.

Ninth Regiment: Company G largest, with 58; Company L smallest, with 40.

The artillery and cavalry paraded in good numbers, and the Ambulance Corps of the Second Brigade had every officer and man of a full enlistment in its ranks.

The reasons given for the absence of men were as follows: Business, 194; refusal of employers, 256; surgeon's certificate, 91; uninstructed recruits not permitted to parade, 140; no excuse, 160. Most of the latter were discharged for "neglect of duty," a few making satisfactory explanation. It is proper to add in this connection that some seventy-five men reported for duty after the noon hour that were not reported on the "morning report," or returned for pay.

The decrease in attendance at this tour of duty is attributed in the main to the refusal of business men and employers to permit their clerks and employees to perform the duty required by law, under the penalty of losing their situations should they absent themselves from their ordinary occupations for this purpose.

From the tables of attendance it would appear that there is more objection on the part of employers to military service in the fall of the year, doubtless due to the fact that vacations are allowed in the season of the encampments, which are taken advantage of by the soldier to be present with his company, showing.no reluctance on his part to perform his full duty. It is not deemed desirable, however, to change the time for holding these drills, but it is important that business men should realize the necessity for their co-operation in a system which has been devised and maintained for the protection of all.

While the militia of the State has attained a high standard in the estimation of the United States military authorities, there are

still many matters of detail which should receive the attention of officers during the coming year for its further improvement. The Board of Examiners, M. V. M., have done much to improve the service by the care exercised in the examination of the officers who come to it through their hands. With good officers and earnest work, success is assured.

The duty performed by the Assistant Inspectors General of this department, and by Major Sanger, First Brigade, and Captain Thompson, Second Brigade, is highly commended.

Respectfully submitted,

SAMUEL DALTON,

Inspector General.

REPORT OF THE SURGEON GENERAL.

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS,

OFFICE OF SURGEON GENERAL, BOSTON, Dec. 31, 1889.

Major General SAMUEL DALTON, Adjutant General, Boston.

SIR-In compliance with the regulations of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, I have the honor to forward you the report of this office for the year ending Dec. 31, 1889.

Very respectfully,

ALFRED F. HOLT,

Surgeon General.

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS,

SURGEON GENERAL'S OFFICE, Boston, Dec. 31, 1889.

To His Excellency the Governor.

SIR:

I have the honor to submit my report of the work of this office for the year ending on this date.

In accordance with regulations governing the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, all the troops were visited at their annual encampments, and personally inspected as to their sanitary condition. The sinks were found properly disinfected, the cook-houses neat and orderly, as well as the stables, quarters and grounds, leaving little or nothing to be desired in this direction. Such neatness and order as was observed about the several camps could only be had by careful and repeated policing; and for work done in this direction both officers and men are entitled to credit. Since the last annual encampment, a new water supply has been obtained for the camp at South Framingham, from one of the ponds in the vicinity of the camp ground; the water first being pumped into a large tank on the hill south of the grounds, and carried from here to the rear of the camp line by a four-inch main, and from here in smaller pipes to convenient points near the cook-houses. This arrangement gives an abundant supply of good soft water.

The wells formerly used have been abandoned,

except three or four which are used for the watering of horses. This new water supply makes it absolutely necessary for the comfort, if not for the health, of the troops, that some means be devised for carrying off waste water from the faucets and cookhouses. At the present this waste water is allowed to soak into the ground. As that which comes from the cook-houses contains more or less organic matter, the ground where it is thrown soon becomes offensive to both sight and smell, and more or less dangerous to health. If possible, this matter should be remedied

before the next encampment.

The instruments, medical and hospital supplies, were found in good condition. Formerly the Surgeon General acted as medical purveyor, the medicine chests being sent to his office when needing to be replenished. As this custom was troublesome and expensive, a few years ago an order was issued allowing the senior medical officer of each command to purvey, such officer first submitting to the Surgeon General a requisition for his approval and authority to purchase such supplies as might be necessary. This plan has proved a saving both of trouble and expense, and assuredly has worked well, giving the medical officer the opportunity to select his own supplies both in kind and quantity. In a few instances, however, there has not been that care and discretion exercised that should have been, in expending public funds; and supplies have been bought in larger quantities than were needed, and sometimes at the highest retail prices. Considered as a whole, the plan is, I believe, a good one.

Early in the month of January the following circular was issued:

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, SURGEON GENERAL'S OFFICE, BOSTON, Jan. 18, 1889.

[Circular No. 1.]

The Ambulance Corps, M. V. M., will, until further instructions, thoroughly review the work of last winter, as ordered in Circular No. 2, dated Oct. 8, 1887. In addition to this, they will be instructed in the improvising and applying of temporary splints. As the temporary splinting of broken bones is all-important to ensure the comfortable transportation of wounded suffering with such injuries, to encourage the training of the soldiers of the Ambulance Corps in preparing and applying splints, the following prizes are offered to each corps :

:

To the soldier making and applying the neatest and best temporary long splint for a broken thigh, Ten Dollars.

To the soldier making the neatest and best temporary splint for a leg broken below the knee, or for an arm broken above the elbow, Five Dollars.

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