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A WESTCHESTER COUNTY LANDSCAPE ALONG THE LINE OF THE PROPOSED BRONX-RIVER PARKWAY.

NEW YORK'S PROPOSED BRONX-RIVER

WHILE

PARKWAY.

HILE the suburban development to the more than a brook, and occupies a narrow valnorthward of New York City has ley some fifteen miles long. After the Bronx been disappointing, in the main, from an enters New York City on its northern bounds æsthetic point of view, the situation is not it passes into what is known as Bronx Park, altogether hopeless. The scenic features of an extensive reservation including the city's Westchester county, long ago described by botanical and zoological gardens. The meCooper and Irving, have not been wholly tropolis is therefore deeply interested in the marred by the ruthless hand of "improve- sanitary purity of this stream, which, of ment" Here and there a tract of woodland course, is determined by conditions at its preserves its native beauties. The rugged head waters.

hills and ravines, although in

many instances denuded of trees, still give an interesting variety to the landscape. Occasionally a sightly knoll or slope has come into the possession of men who have had enough consideration for nature's prior rights to make their improvements conform as far as possible to the original contour of the land. From some of these elevations fine views may be had of miles of green and peaceful countryside.

Through the heart of this region, about midway between Long Island Sound and the Hudson, and nearly parallel to the latter, runs the Bronx River, a small stream, which in most of its course is little

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It was this latter consideration that led parkway to follow the course of the little directly to the conception of a project for a river from Bronx Park northward to Ken

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VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE SHOWN IN THE PICTURE ABOVE, REVEALING THE ENCROACHMENTS OF COMMERCE.

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INDUSTRY INVADING NATURE'S HAUNTS, A SCENE ON THE BRONX IN WESTCHESTER COUNTY.* (To restore the right bank to a condition something like that of the left bank will be one of the objects of the Parkway Commission.)

sico reservoir, amid the Westchester hills. Acquiring by condemnation a strip of land from 300 to 1000 feet wide, along both banks of the Bronx, the parkway commission will be able once for all to check the pollution of the stream and restore its waters to their original state of purity. Without some control of this sort the stream is rapidly becoming a public nuisance. It is only a question of time when it will have to be dealt with as

a sewer.

Apart from the question of sanitation, the preservation of scenic features would justify such a work as the proposed parkway. For several miles in Westchester county the banks of the Bronx are wooded and remain almost as they were when white men first came to the region, more than two centuries ago; but if steps are not taken very soon to secure possession of these wooded banks they will be despoiled of their beauty forever. It would

The photographs accompanying this article, taken by Col. E. A. Havers, are reproduced by the courtesy of the Bronx-River Parkway Commission.

be a shame to permit the needless sacrifice of these bits of woodland scenery, within twenty miles of New York City, now that they have survived to this late day the ravages of real-estate companies and suburbanlot speculators.

Besides ministering to the city's æsthetic' needs, the Bronx-River parkway will offer a direct and practical connection between New York's park system and the open country to the northward. It will be the chief boulevard leading out of the city. From the limits of Bronx Park it will form a continuous driveway for fifteen miles, to the great Kensico reservation of 4000 acres which is soon to be established in connection with New York's system of water supply. The cost of the parkway will be divided between New York City and Westchester county, the former paying three-fourths and the latter one-fourth. The total cost is estimated at $2,500,000, the amount to be expended under a State commission named in the bill as introduced in the Legislature at Albany.

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THE "SUN PARLOR IN THE PRIVATE HOTEL FOR TELEPHONE GIRLS OF PARIS.

A CO-OPERATIVE BOARDING-HOUSE FOR
FRENCH TELEPHONE GIRLS.

ΑΝ N interesting experiment in civic better-
ment in Paris which promises to be of
far-reaching importance to the working-
classes of the French capital has recently
been inaugurated in the co-operative board-
ing-house and civic center for telephone girls.
As is the case with many young women of
other industrial classes in the great cities of
the world, the French "hello" girls have
been living chiefly in the poorer quarters of
the city, improperly cared for, and exposed
to a great many privations and tempta-
tions.

Within the past year the attention of the Ministry of Commerce was drawn to this state of affairs and a government commission was appointed to investigate. A popular appeal was then made for the erection of a model dwelling for girls who were employed in the postoffice and telephone and telegraph offices, which, it will be remembered, are government-owned in France. Soon a company was formed and incorporated with a capital of 400,000 francs ($80,000). This society immediately began the erection of a

model building. Much of the success of this building was due, naturally, to the genius and labor of the architect. Commissioned by the government of the republic, this gentleman (M. Bliault) made extended tours throughout almost every country of the world, studying what has already been done in the way of working-girls' homes. As a result, the Paris building is a real model. No space is lost, and the structure is remarkable for the light which is afforded to every corner of it. This, in fulfillment of the motto of the "Association des Cités Jardins de France," which was chiefly instrumental in building the home,-"Of all flowers the human is the kind which requires the most sun.'

This "Maison des Dames des Postes et de Téléphones" is seven stories high. In the basement is the kitchen; on the ground floor, the hall, the drawing room, the dining room, and parlor. The walls are largely of glass, and the floors of marble. On the ground floor is a beautiful "Jardin Français," decorated with a great variety of plants and

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shrubs. On each floor are eighteen separate rooms, including sleeping-rooms, pantries, bathrooms, telephone booths, and so forth. The rooms are attractively decorated, and everything in the way of fabric is washable, from curtains to walls. The rooms lighted by electricity and heated by steam, and each one opens upon a balcony. During the summer months the girls are expected to cultivate balcony gardens. Living expenses are not high. The largest room costs 35 francs ($7) per month, and the table d'hote dinner, including four courses, is never more than 16 cents.

Already the building has become a civic center for the working-girls of Paris. The telephone and postoffice girls have formed themselves into women's clubs, holding frequent meetings, at which they discuss all questions of feminine interest. They have already formed, also, classes in dressmaking and in Esperanto.

Among the founders of this excellent institution are a number of the more prominent

CORNER OF A GIRL'S ROOM IN THE PRIVATE HOTEL FOR TELEPHONE OPERATORS IN PARIS.

figures in French official and business life. manufacturer, and M. Jules Siegfried, They include M. Menier, the wealthy cocoa former Minister of Commerce.

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