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The Outlook

A-Family-Paper

New Series of The Christian Union Copyright, 1896, by The Outlook Company. Entered as second-class matter in the New York Post-Office.

The Outlook is a weekly Family Paper, containing this week forty pages. The subscription price is Three Dollars a year, payable in advance.

Postage is Prepaid by the publishers for all subscriptions in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. For all other countries in the Postal Union add $1.56 for postage. Changes of Address.-When a change of address is ordered, both the new and the old address must be given. The notice should be sent one week before the change is to take effect. Discontinuances.-If a subscriber wishes his copy of the paper discontinued at the expiration of his subscription, notice to that effect should be sent. Otherwise it is assumed that a continuance of the subscription is desired. How to Remit.-Remittances should be sent by Check, Draft, Express-Order, or Money-Order, payable to order of THE OUTLOOK COMPANY. Cash should be sent in Registered Letter. Letters should be addressed:

THE OUTLOOK,

Clinton Hall, Astor Place,
New York.

About People

-King Menelek is said to be worth over $7,000,000 in gold and jewels.

-Herr Lothair von Faber, of Nuremberg, who recently died, left $500,000 for the purpose of beautifying the city.

-The oldest living English composer is Charles Salaman, whose song "I Arise from Dreams of Thee" was published sixty years ago.

-Mme. Camille Selden, the English woman who helped nurse Heinrich Heine in his last years, and whom he called his "mouche," died recently at Orsay.

-Edwin Lord Weeks, the American artist who was appointed a Chevalier of the Legion of Honor of France recently, is a Bostonian. He is as great a traveler as a painter. He has lived in Paris for twenty years.

-A requiem in memory of Franz Liszt, who died ten years ago, was celebrated in the Catholic church at Bayreuth on July 31. Frau Cosima Wagner, his daughter, observed the anniversary by a musical soirée at the Villa Wahnfried.

-Perhaps the oldest Mormon living is Elder Lorenzo Snow, whose full title is President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-Day Saints. He is about eighty-three years old, and has been in the ministry of the Mormon Church for fifty years.

-A curious example of the vicissitudes of fortune is that of the late Mr. Pattison, who recently died at Rockhampton, in Queensland. He was a butcher, who struck gold, became very rich, went into politics, was made Postmaster-General, lost his money, and returned to his butcher-shop again, dying a poor man.

-A search is to be made at the ancient church of St. Mary, in Gravesend, England, for the remains of Pocahontas (Mrs. Thomas Rolfe), which are supposed to lie there and not in the church where the tablet is to be erected. A movement is on foot to erect a monument to her at the place of her death.

-Rainilaiarivony, the late Malagasy exPrime Minister, left 50,000 head of cattle, 2,000 slaves, 20,000 ounces of gold dust,

$1,000,000 in the Bank of England, $75,000 worth of goods in his own house, a palace and other buildings at Antananarivo, the land

on which the French residence-general is built (for which France pays $2,400 a year), three inland farms, real estate at Tamatave, and half the profits of a gold-mine concession made to an English company.

-The following story is told in the Dumfries (Scotland) "Standard" of Mr. Robert Wallace, the Radical member for Edinburgh:

The editor of a local paper once asked the Doctor -by which appellation Mr. Wallace continues to be addressed in the North-if he would kindly furnish an article on a "light theological topic." The Doctor responded with one bearing the title "The Relations between the Presbyterian Churches and Modern Thought." When set up, the article made forty

columns, and it became a puzzle to editor and printer how to get rid of it. They began by using it in pieces, and whenever the printer said to the editor, "We've got no leader," the reply was, "Eh, mon, just sneck off about a column and a quarter o' Wallace." In this way the contribution is being used, first working down from the beginning, then upwards from the end. And, as the story goes, "they are at it still."

-Some pleasant reminiscences of the late Professor Newton, of Yale, are recounted by a writer in the Waterbury "American :"

He was almost wholly mathematical. He thought in equations and he looked in curves. At a dancing party once given at his house, he came in unexpectedly upon the dancers, with that bland smile on his face which will never be forgotten by any one who has seen it, to show the young people the algebraic formulæ of the curves they were executing as they tripped through the measures of the waltz or the polka, or danced the figures of the lancers. He predicted that the time would come when a lady wishing a wall-paper would consult some such mathematical authority as himself, who would give her a little equation which she could take down to some wall-paper maker and have it worked out in an entirely novel design.

He was taking a walk one day with the late Stuart Phelps (brother of "Gates Ajar"), and, as usual, branched off into an abstruse mathematical problem. Mr. Phelps paid little attention to its intricacies, which no one but a Professor Newton could

follow; but when the Professor ended by saying, "Which, you see, gives us X," politely asked, thinking something was expected, "Does it ?" The Professor, in great consternation, said, "Doesn't it?" and like lightning ran over in his mind the calculations of which he had been discoursing. In less

time than it takes to tell it, he slapped Mr. Phelps on the back with great excitement, exclaiming : "You are right, Mr. Phelps, you are right. It does not give us X, it gives us Y," and immediately obtained for Mr. Phelps a mathematical tutorship. That gentleman probably knew less about mathematics (he was a distinguished psychologist) than almost any other man who ever obtained a degree at Yale. He used to tell this story on himself with great gusto.

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492

for The Outlook, made to hold compactly and conveniently twenty-six numbers, will be sent by mail on receipt of sixty cents. THE OUTLOOK CO. NEW YORK

SUBSCRIBERS' WANTS

Want advertisements of thirty words or less will be published under this heading at one dollar a week. Four cents a week is charged for each word in excess of thirty.

YOUNG LADIES wishing to attend Brooklyn schools may find board and home comforts at Mrs. A. Amrath's private house, 525 Lafayette Ave. Motherly care and training given to younger children. German taught if desired. Refers to Rev. John W. Chadwick.

COMPANION.-An educated and refined lady of middle age desires a position as companion. No objection to traveling. Highest references. Address Miss E. M., 104 Prospect Street, Binghamton, N. Y.

YALE UNIVERSITY.-For rent near Yale University, several first-class houses; two of them furnished. Also smaller rents in half-house and flats. Address JOHN T. SLOAN, New Haven, Conn.

REFINED LADY desires a matron's position by Oct. 1, or would act as managing housekeeper where help is kept; good references. Address "C. Y.," care Nickerson & Co., 31 Broadway, New York City.

A PLEASANT VILLAGE HOME and satisfactory instruction for two or three children in the family of a retired clergyman. Best of references given. Address P. O. Box 21, Saybrook, Conn.

A LADY, educated and refined, living in healthful location m the South, would like four or six young ladies in her family for study of modern languages and music: exceptional opportunity; references. "P.," No. 1,802, care of The Outlook.

A TIMELY BOOK

AN ESSAY ON THE

New York City

EDUCATIONAL

New York City

PRESENT DISTRIBUTION SCHERMERHORN'S TEACHERS' AGENCY Misses Whitfield and Bliss Boarding

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BERKELEY SCHOOL

IN THE UNITED STATES
By CHARLES B. SPAHR, Ph.D., Associate
Editor of The Outlook. 12mo, 184
pp. Appendices, Index. (Vol. XII.
in Crowell's Library of Economics playground-the Berkeley Oval-Oval Cottage, Manual

and Politics.) $1.50.

Dr. Spahr's book is concise and logical; it appeals to the reason and deserves to be read by all thoughtful men. It cannot fail to have a powerful influence on the thought of the time.

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The above are for sale by all booksellers, or will be sent, postpaid, upon receipt of price, by

the publishers,

(Combining city and country life), New York
City. Besides the day school thirty-five boarding pupils
are received, in two separate buildings, under seven
resident teachers, securing the most complete home life.
Fire-proof school house, armory, gymnasium, ten-acre

Training, and Military Drill fully presented in the regis
ter for '96. 250 boys have been prepared for the leading
colleges. JOHN S. WHITE, LL.D., Head Master.

NEW YORK 120 Broad-("Dwight Method"
LAW SCHOOL S York City.
way, New
of Instruction
LL.B. in two years. Graduate course, one year. High
standards. Largest Law School east of Michigan. Send
for catalogue.
GEORGE CHASE, Dean.

Miss S. D. Doremus

BOARDING and DAY SCHOOL for GIRLS
REOPENS OCTOBER 1ST.
735 Madison Avenue, New York.

RS. ELLIMAN'S KINDERGARTEN AND
MELEMENTARY CLASS opens Oct. 1st.
Training-class for kindergartners. One year's course.
Practice work. Class limited. 1786 Broadway, N. Y. City.

The Misses Ely's School for Girls

RIVERSIDE drive

85th and 86th Streets, New York

TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR OF

MISS GIBBONS' SCHOOL |
New York City, 55 West 47th St. Mrs. SARAH H.
EMERSON, Principal. Primary and Advanced Classes.
taken. Reopens Sept. 30, 1896.

THOMAS Y. Crowell & Co. Preparation for all Colleges. A few boarding scholars

New York and Boston

THE PLYMOUTH HYMNAL

EDITED BY

LYMAN ABBOTT

WITH THE CO-OPERATION OF

Herbert Vaughan Abbott and Charles H. Morse
Read what the Pastor of the Oldest
Church in Maine says:
The oldest church in this commonwealth
welcomes to its service this modern contribu-
tion to sacred song, and is pleased to find the
essential faith of the fathers voiced in the

noblest tunes and uttered in the choicest hymns
of yesterday and to-day. The editor has ad-
mirably succeeded in bringing "things new
and old" out of the lyric treasures of the
Church universal. M. J. ALLEN,

Minister of the First Parish, York, Me.

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The Misses Graham (Misses Green

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS (established 1816).
New location. 176 West 72d Street, Sherman Square.
NEW YORK

Cate accepted by Smith, Vassar, and Wellesley

LASSICAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.-Certifi

EDITH H. GREGORY, ELIZABETH P. GETTY, Principals.

Day School for Girls, 41 West 124th Street, Mount Morris Park, New York City. Reopens October 1st.

California

POMONA COLLEGE, Claremont, Cal.-Full

courses leading to degrees of B.A., B.L., 3.S. Degrees recognized by University of California and other similar graduate schools. Thirty-five miles from Los Angeles. An Academic course Preparatory school preparing for all institutions connected with the College. Address C. G. BALDWIN, President.

Canada

ONTARIO LADIES' COLLEGE
Whitby, Ontario.-Pronounced by Minister of Edu-
cation "the best equipped college for women in Canada.
The sanitary arrangements are perfect. Steam heating,
electric lighting, new Pipe Organ, &c. Apply for Calen-
dar to
Rev. J. J. HARE, Ph.D., Prin.

Connecticut

Brookfield Center, Fairfield Co., Conn.

The Curtis School for Young Boys A strong life in school and out, full of normal activities and healthy conditions. A clean moral atmosphere, a loyalty, a high purpose-full of help for your boy's manhood. Home life; single rooms. $500. 22d year. A book full of suggestion. FREDERICK S CURTIS.

The Housatonic Valley Institute Cornwall,

Among the Berkshire Hills of Northwestern Connecticut.
Home School for boys. Classical, Scientific, Business,
Preparatory Courses. Thirteenth year.
H. B. MacFarland, S. B., L. W. Arnold, A.B., Principals.

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Resident pupils. 2034 Fifth Avenue, New York City Woodside Seminary Tom City ad

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dary grades, respectively, and for the work of supervision LYME, CONN. Home School for Little Boys, Care
organization. Send for circular of information and
WALTER L. HERVEY, President.

Bulletin.

ful training and watchful oversight in pleasant, healthful country home. Entire charge throughout the year if desired. Address Miss A. N. GRIFFIN.

Union Theological Seminary Mrs. and Miss Cady's

700 Park Avenue, New York

The next term will begin Wednesday, September 23,
1896.
The Faculty will meet in the President's room at 9:30
A.M., receiving applications for admission.

Rooms will be drawn at 2 P.M.

The opening address will be delivered by
PRESIDENT HASTINGS

in the Adams Chapel, Thursday, Sept. 24th, at 4 P.M.
E. M KINGSLEY, Secy.

University
Law School

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dental fee Address for catalogue, REGISTRAR,

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University, Washington Square, East, or Professor Miss Baird's Institute for Girls

I. F. RUSSELL, 120 Broadway, N. Y. City.

160-162 West 74th Street, New York

THE VELTIN SCHOOL
Reopen's October 5th. School for Girls. College Prepa.
ration. Fire-proof School Building.

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Connecticut

THOROUGH EDUCATION

IN A COUNTRY HOME NORFOLK, CONN.-$600. Among the Berkshires, a pleasant, accessible home for 6 boys, to be opened Sept. 29, by Mr. Henry N. Dickinson (Amherst) and Mrs. Dickinson (Mt. Holyoke). Seven years' experience. The Norfolk Library. The Eldridge Gymnasium. Outdoor life and hard study in abundance, but skillfully adapted and directed. A hearty interest in every boy. Thorough preparation for any college. Mr. Dickinson will be glad to give references and answer inquiries. Address HENRY N. DICKINSON, Norfolk, Conn.

"What we do.

we do well."

Betts Academy,

Each

Stamford, Conn. Home life and the individual are the keynotes at this school. boy is taught how to study-how to think and reason for himself, and is trained in observation and research.

Preparation for any Technical School or University, and a liberal, practical training to those not intending to enter college.

On September 21st New building, modern conventhe old bell will ring iences. Large, beautiful grounds in our 58th year. adapted for athletics and out-door sports of all seasons. Illustrated catalogue on applicaPersonal inspection preferred. (One hour from New York.) WM. J. BETTS, M.A. (Yale), Principal.

tion.

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Rockford College for Women

Fall Term Opens Wed., Sept. 16, 1896

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Michigan

STUDY

Journalism

AT HOME.

Reporting, Editing, all branches of newspaper and literary work taught. Students everywhere. Takes

BY MAIL. only your spare time. Practi

cal work from the start. Im

proved methods. Best results. Catalogue FREE. THE SPRAGUE CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM, No. 17 Telephone Building, Detroit, Mich.

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Boston University Law School IVY HALL JERSEY.-Home and

New Hall, Ashburton Place,
Boston, Mass.

Opens Oct. 7.

18 Newbury St., Boston, Mass. Miss Frances V. Emerson's School for Girls College Preparatory, Regular and Advanced Courses.

THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL A select, private school for girls. Best preparation for college. Many courses not leading to college. Comforts of home. Mr. ARTHUR GILMAN is the Director, Cambridge, Mass.

PROSPECT HILL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
GREENFIELD, MASS.

A thorough education with good home influence.
Established 1869.

Miss IDA F. FOSTER,

Miss CAROLINE R. CLARK,

Principals.

LOWELL, ROGERS HALL

BRIDGETON. NEW College Preparatory School for Young Ladies. Certificate admits to Smith. Established 1861. Mrs. J. ALLEN MAXWELL, Principal.

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A Home School for Girls and Young Women. Certificate Young Ladies' Seminary

admits to Smith and Wellesley. Reopens October first. Terms, $750. References: Mrs. Alice Freeman Palmer, Mrs. Frederic T. Greenhalge. For further particulars address Mrs. E. P. UNDERHILL, M.A., Príncipal.

MONTVALE, MASS.

Preparation for College. Seminary Course. Post-Graduate Studies. Art, Music, Oratory. For catalogue apply to the Misses SEWALL, Principals.

PEDDIE INSTITUTE Hightstown, N. J.
Prepares for College,
Art. Both sexes. 29th year opens Sept.
Address

Classical and Science Courses. Excellent Preparatory Ashley Hall Home School Teaching Business, Courses in German, French, Music

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ATTRACTIVE LIFE CALLING An unequaled opportunity for some of our best men and women in the new profession"-lay Sunday-school and Missionary work. The School for Christian Workers, Springfield, Mass., should enter 100 leaders Sept. 9th in order to begin to fill the demand. New: Ladies' Home. recognized practical missionary instructor, decision by trustees to place Institution on highest educational basis and secure as president a leader among college and seminary presidents. Arouse your friends and send for catalog.

Windsor Hall School

prepares girls for Radcliffe and other colleges. Studies elective in other courses. Comfortable home. Ten miles from Boston. Dr. CHARLES H. CLARK, Principal, WABAN, MASSACHUSETTS

Miss Kimball's School for Girls Worcester,

Mass.

Thorough preparation for College. Intermediate, Academic, and Special Courses. Send for Illustrated Circular

Rev. JOSEPH E. PERRY, Ph.D., Prin.

Lakewood Heights School

" Among the Pines." THOROUGH AND ATTRACTIVE. Prepares for College, Scientific Schools, or Business. $600. JAMES W. MOREY, A.M., Principal. LAKEWOOD, N. J.

Glenwood Collegiate Institute

MATAWAN, NEW JERSEY

A thorough preparatory school. Co-educational. Moderate price. Classical, Scientific, and Special Courses. Graduates this year enter Columbia, Rutgers, and Vassar Colleges. One of its graduates is the Republican Candidate for Vice-President of the U. S. Character-building is one of the chief objects of the system of education in this institution. Address the Principal.

1

Miss Dana's School for Girls,
Morristown, New Jersey, will reopen September 23
Certificate admits to Smith, Wellesley, and Baltimore
Colleges. Music and Art. Resident native French and
German teachers. Nearness to New York affords spe-
cial advantages. Boarding pupils, $700.

Academic and College

HIGHLAND MILITARY ACADEMY, Wer MOUNT HOLLY, N. J. Preparatory School for

year. Best preparation for College, Professional or Business Lite, Healthful location. Careful selection and supervision of students. Small Classes.

JOSEPH ALDEN. SHAW. A.M., Head Master..

Girls reopens September 16. References: Gov. Griggs,
The Rev. Waldo Burnett. Apply to
Miss PARKAB

Miss HARRIMAN. A.B., Principals.

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Riverview Academy

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y.

61st year. Gives Boys a thorough preparation for College, for Business Life, and for Govt. schools. Riverview students are found in all colleges and scientific schools. The Instructors, nine of whom are resident, are men of experience in their departments. United States officer detailed at Riverview by Secretary of War. The Buildings of the school are beautifully situated on high ground overlooking the Hudson. Careful attention has been given to drainage, lighting, and ventilation. J B. BISBEE, A.M.

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New York

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R. COLTON, ISABEL D. HUBBARD, Principals. ST. JOHN'S SCHOOL

KATHARINE S. WOODWARD,

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THE HUDSON RIVER INSTITUTE

MANLIUS, N. Y. Next term begins September 16th, 1896. Apply to WM. VERBECK.

NEW YORK, Newburgh.

The Misses Mackie's School for Girls Academic and College-Preparatory. Special advantages in Art and Music. Certificate admits to Vassar and Wellesley.

One and a half hours from New York.

A Classical Seminary of high grade for boys and girls LYNDON HALL SCHOOL

Beautiful and healthful location in the Hudson River Valley. A record of forty-two years of uninterrupted successful educational work. Conservatory of Music. Art, and Elocution. 43d year begins Sept. 16. For catalogues address Rev. A. H. FLACK, A.M., Principal, Claverack, N. Y.

CANANDAIGUA, N. Y.

Granger Place School for Girls

A Collegiate Course of Study. Diplomas given. Preparatory course admits to leading colleges by certificate. Special attention given to the culture of girls who are not expecting to enter college, but desire a thorough and practical education.

For Young Ladies. 48th year. College preparation. SAMUEL WELLS BUCK, A.M., Poughkeepsie, N. Y

Rockland Institute

Nyack-on-the-Hudson, N. Y.

Through preparatory school for Young Men and Boys near N. Y. Fits for college or business. A safe Home with careful training and discipline. Superb, healthful location overlooking the Hudson. The only school with free saddle-horses and ponies for drill and recreation. Moderate rates. Ill. Catalogue of Capt. J. WILSON, A.M., Prin.

DREW LADIES' SEMINARY TEMPLE GROVE SEMINARY

CARMEL, N. Y.

31st year begins Sept. 24th. New gymnasium and music hall. "An excellent educational institution."Chauncey M. Depew. A delightful home school." Margaret Bottome. Illustrated catalogue.

JAMES M. YEAGER, D.D., Pres.

SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y. For Young Women Forty-second year begins Sept. 23d. CHARLES F. DOWD, Ph.D., Pres. Send for year-book giving details of courses to FRANKLIN B. Dowd, Asst Prin.

New York Military Academy SETAUKET SEMINARY

CORNWALL-ON-HUDSON

For boarding cadets only. Distinctively military in organization and discipline. Located on the Hudson River four miles from West Point, in a region famous for its beauty and healthfulness. For catalogue address

S. C. JONES, C.E., Superintendent.

Fort Edward Collegiate Institute

For young women and girls. A choice of six courses or special studies. 39th year Sept. 22d, 1896. $350. Illustrated catalogue. JOS: E. KING, Pres., Fort Edward, N. Y.

Setauket, Long Island. New York.-Fourth year will begin Sept. 23d, 1896. Terms, $225. Address Principal.

Tarrytown-on-Hudson, N. Y. 25 miles from N. Y.
City. 41st year begins in September. Summer term.
J. M. FURMAN, A.M., Principal.

Ohio

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COLLEGE PREPARATORY AND PRIMARY

classes; boarding and day school; both sexes; combined advantages of class work and individual instruction; earnest young people find here excellent opportunity to make up lost time. The work is thorough and practical, and the moral tone high. A spirit of earnest endeavor and of honest pride in each other's success pervades the place. The best evidence of the value of the school is to be found in the good opinion of its neighbors, patrons and pupils. Boarding pupils, $325 a year.

ARTHUR H. TOMLINSON, Principal SWARTHMORE GRAMMAR SCHOOL Swarthmore, Pa.

NEWPORT, R. I.

Rhode Island

Mount Pleasant Military Academy MR. JOHN B. DIMAN (A. M. Harvard) will open

A high-grade school for boys. Fits for college and for business. Eighty-second year. Library of 12,000 volumes. Reference: Hon. JOSEPH H. CHOATE: HAMILTON W. MABIE, L.H.D. CHARLES F. BRUSIE, A.M., ARTHUR T. EMORY, A.B., Principals. Sing Sing-on-Hudson.

HOME INSTITUTE A Boarding and Day

School for Girls. College preparation, Music, Languages, and Art. Miss M. W. METCALF, Principal, Tarrytown-on-Hudson.

a small boarding-school for boys in Newport. R. I., Oct. 1, 1896. Preparation for any college or scientific school. For circular and references address Box 455, Newport, R. I.

PROVIDENCE, R. I. FRIENDS SCHOOL FOR BOTH SEXES

Founded in 1784. Excellent home. Students from 18 States. All denominations Thorough work in English, Science, Classics, Music, and Art. Address

AUGUSTINE JONES, LL.B.

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