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NEW PSYCHOLOGY

BY

J. P. GORDY, Ph.D., LL.D.

HEAD OF THE PEDAGOGICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

Copyright, 1898, by Hinds & Noble

HINDS & NOBLE, Publishers

4-5-13-14 COOPER INSTITUTE, NEW YORK CITY

First edition, March, 1898. Second edition, May, 1898.
Third edition, September, 1898. Fourth edition, October, 1898.
Fifth edition, December, 1898. Sixth edition, January, 1899.

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1901 BI .665

N

PREFACE.

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That the most effective teaching is impossible without an acquaintance with the elementary principles of Psychology, is no longer a debated question. Fortunately there are many who are “born teachers.” Even they are more successful when to a "certain instinct for teaching' they have added a knowledge of Psychology. Still more helpful to a genuine success is a knowledge of the Mind to the plodding rank and file, that large body of earnest men and women teachers whose really splendid equipment for their profession is to be credited to unremitting hard work inspired by an honest ambition to win success, and sturdy determination to avail themselves of every approved

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resource.

This book has been written principally for the special benefit of that large number of progressive young teachers who have not enjoyed the benefits of a college education, but who nevertheless are striving without the aid of an instructor to make their work rational and therefore more efficient by basing it on a knowledge of the Mind. The division of the subject matter into “Lessons,” while admirably adapting the book to the special requirements of teachers' reading circles, was particularly intended by the author to supply the need of a practicable text-book for

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