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The train was late when the Boy pulled into New York. It was beyond the banquet hour by a good many minutes when he reached the hall. He put his hand on the doorknob and started to turn it, then stopped and thought, "I'll go back," but this kind of a boy never goes back, he goes in. He opened the door, and instantly, the President of the Class came striding down, holding out both hands, grasped his, and said, laughingly, "Gee, I'm glad to see you, it's a sight for sore eyes, train late?" And all the while he was talking the President had been leading the boy up to a table where one plate had been left turned down, and around that plate was a garland of Bay leaves. Then the President said, while the Boy stood as if he was in a dream, his head reeling, the floor billowing under his feet, "Now, men, fill them up! Are they all filled? Then listen! I'm not going to slop over, it's not my way, but here's to

the man whose example has made it possible for most of us to be decent, and for some of us to begin what we hope will prove to be a career helpful to all mankind: Here's to the man who refused to ride to success over duty: Here's why, here's to HIM!" They drank and sat down.

Then the President turned to the Boy and said, "You're the Guest of Honor tonight, old man, if there are any. I didn't dare write you, I knew how modest you always were, but we wanted to look at you, to let you know that the "Old Gang" understands."

The Boy bowed his head on his hands, and the hot tears trickled through them, nothing mattered any more, the fact that She had not come, and would not, all the hard things he had endured vanished from his remembrance. One thing loomed up against the horizon of his life as big as God: The fellows had understood after all.

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By ALICE STONE BLACKWELL

QUAL suffrage is at bottom a question of fair play and equity. The reasons why women should vote are the same as the reasons for having a republic rather than a monarchy. It is fair and right that the people who must obey the laws should have a voice in choosing the law-makers, and that the people who must pay the taxes should have a voice as to the amount of the tax, and the way in which the tax money shall be spent.

Except where a good reason can be shown to the contrary, everyone is entitled to be consulted in regard to his own concerns. The laws he must obey and the taxes he must pay are matters which very closely concern him, and the only legal way of being consulted in regard to them is through the ballot.

JUSTICE THE FOUNDATION Roughly stated, the fundamental principle of democracy is this: In deciding what is to be done, where everybody's interests are concerned, we take everybody's opinion, and go according to the wish of the majority. Since we cannot suit everybody, we do what will suit the largest number. That seems to be, upon the whole, the fairest way. A vote is only a written expression of opinion.

In thus taking a vote, to get at the wish of the majority, certain persons are passed over, whose opinions, for one reason or another, are thought not to be worth counting. These persons are children, aliens, idiots, lunatics, criminals and women. There are good and obvious reasons for making all these exceptions but the last. Is there any good reason why no direct account should be taken of the opinions of women?

A GROWING CAUSE

There is a growing belief that no sound reason can be given. The

trend toward woman suffrage visible in almost every part of the civilized world, and the movement of events is all one way.

Ninety years ago, women could not vote anywhere, except at municipal elections in Sweden and a few other places in Europe.

In the forty years 1830 to 1870, women were given full suffrage in Wyoming, municipal suffrage in England, Victoria, Finland and New South Wales, and school suffrage in Kentucky, Kansas and Ontario.

In the twenty years 1870 to 1890, women were given municipal suffrage in Kansas, Scotland, New Zealand, South and West Australia, Tasmania, Iceland, Ontario, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Quebec, British Columbia and the Northwest Territory; school suffrage in Michigan Minnesota, Colorado, New Hampshire, Oregon, Massachusetts, New York, Vermont, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Montana, Arizona, Oklahoma and New Jersey and full suffrage in the Isle of Man. In Montana, taxpaying women were given a vote upon all questions submitted to the taxpayers.

In the twenty years 1890 to 1910, women were given full suffrage in Colorado, Idaho, Utah, Finland, Norway, New Zealand, South and West Australia, Tasmania, Queensland, Victoria and New South Wales; municipal suffrage in Ireland, Denmark and the Province of Vorarlberg (Austrian Tyrol); and school suffrage in Illinois, Connecticut, Ohio, Delaware and Wisconsin. In Iowa and Kansas women were given a vote on bonding propositions, and in Minnesota a vote for library trustees.

In Louisiana, in Michigan, and in all the towns and villages of New York State, tax-paying women were given a vote on questions of local taxation. In France, women engaged in trade were given a vote for

Judges of the Tribunals of Commerce. In Belgium, women were given a vote for the Conseils des Prudhommes.

In the years from 1910 to 1915 inclusive, women were given full suffrage in California, Washington, Kansas, Oregon, Arizona, Montana, Nevada, Alaska, Iceland, Denmark and Bosnia*; municipal suffrage and the right to vote for President of the United States in Illinois; municipal suffrage in South Africa, in Laibach (Austria), Baroda (India), and Belize (Honduras); and school suffrage in New Mexico. Women taxpayers were given a vote upon bonding propositions in all the third-class cities of New York State. Individual cities in several different States gave women a vote upon local questions; and the Kingdom of Wurtemberg gave women engaged in agriculture a vote for members of the Chamber of Agriculture.

Years ago, when equal suffrage was much less popular than it is now, somebody asked Bishop Gilbert Haven if it were true that he had been speaking at a suffrage meeting. "Yes," answered the Bishop. "I

do not want to fall in at the rear of this reform; I prefer to march with the procession!"

There can be no doubt as to which way the procession is moving.

NEIGHBORS ADOPT IT

"The proof of the pudding is in the eating." The best evidence that equal suffrage has been found satisfactory is that it spreads steadily from state to state. With the exception of Illinois, the enfranchised States lie in a solid block, all bordering upon one another, and now occupying almost the whole western half of the United States. If equal suffrage had caused general unhappiness in the first state which tried it-if it had led to one tenth part of the horrible consequences which

*Full suffrage is used in this article as meaning the right to vote for the highest elective offices. In Bosnia and some other places there is a property qualification

are predicted from it-the people right across the border could not have failed to know it, and they would not have followed the example.

CALIFORNIA DEFEATS REPEAL

Another proof that it works well is that it is not repealed anywhere. The late Justice Brewer of the U. S. Supreme Court said this showed decisively that the majority of the people were satisfied with it. An unsuccessful attempt was made to repeal it in California in 1912, under the initiative and referendum. One of the printed circulars sent out by the California anti-suffragists at that time can be seen at Massachusetts Suffrage Headquarters, 585 Boylston St., Boston. It appeals for help in circulating the initiative petition to have the question resubmitted. It says, in part: "Only 32,000 signatures are necessary. The expenses so far for printing, obtaining signatures, etc., amount to more than $1500. Send us $100, $50, $5 or $1. A majority of the men and a majority of the women are opposed to woman suffrage. If this be true, it will surely be repealed. Get in and help."

Both men and women were eligible to sign. There were about 1,500,000 men and women of voting age in California; yet the antis failed to get the 32,000 signatures needed to resubmit the question.

ADVERSE TESTIMONY SCARCE

For twenty years, an active AntiSuffrage Association in Massachusetts has been gathering all the adverse testimony that it could get. In all the enfranchised states put together it has not yet found a dozen respectable men who say over their Own names and addresses that suffrage has had any bad results.* FAVORABLE TESTIMONY OVERWHELMING

The personal testimonies to its good results would fill many pages.

*Unless some new testimony has come n during the last few weeks

the enfranchised states who are most distinguished for their good works, from Judge Lindsey and Jane Addams down. Judge Lindsey says, in a letter written to be used during the suffrage campaign in Oregon:

"It certainly has not made women any less womanly or any less motherly. It does not take any mother from her home duties to spend ten minutes in going to the polls, casting her ballot, and returning; and during that ten minutes she wields a power which is doing more to protect her home, and all other homes, than any other power or influence in Colorado." Judge Lindsey added: "Many good laws have been secured in Colorado through the influence of women. I have never known one evil as the result of it."

Jane Addams says there are now hardly any antis to be found in Illinois. The bill introduced in the last Illinois Legislation for the repeal of woman suffrage never got out of committees.

All the governors of the suffrage states for many years have declared that it works well. The Legislatures of California, Colorado and Wyoming

and the Federal Parliament of Australia, have passed resolutions to that effect, by a unanimous vote. If the Massachusetts Legislature passed any resolution unanimously it would be a sure proof that the resolution expressed the prevailing sentiment of Massachusetts-no matter whether the legislators were voicing their own opinion or what they believed to be the opinion of their constituents.

IDAHO JUDGES APPROVE

In Idaho, the Chief Justice and all the Justices of the Supreme Court have signed a published statement, saying in part: "The large vote cast by the women established the fact that they take a lively interest. Woman suffrage is more popular among our people than when first adopted. None of the predicted evils have come to pass. If resubmitted, it would now be adopted by a vote almost unanimous."

KANSAS FURNISHES TEST

In Kansas women had municipal suffrage for 25 years before they got the full ballot. A letter of inquiry was sent from the office of the Woman's Journal to the Chief Justice and all the Justices of the Supreme Court. All concurred in substance with Chief Justice W. A. Johnston, who wrote: "In consequence, our elections are more orderly and fair, a higher class of officers are chosen, and we have cleaner and stronger city governments." After her long experience of municipal suffrage, Kansas adopted full suffrage by a much heavier majority than any of the many states which voted on the question at about the same time. The men liked the sample, and wanted more of the goods.

MINISTERS AND EDITORS FAVOR

Mrs. Julia Ward Howe wrote to all the editors, and to all the ministers. of five leading denominations, in the oldest four suffrage states, asking whether equal suffrage worked well or ill. She got 624 answers, of which 62 were unfavorable, 46 on the fence and 516 in favor. The replies from the Episcopalian clergymen were in favor, more than two to one; from the Baptist ministers, seven to one; from the Congregationalists, about eight to one; from the Methodists, more than ten to one, and from the Presbyterians, more than eleven to one. Other circular letters of inquiry have been sent out to the enfranchised states. The editor of the New York Sun, the editor of the Christian Endeavor World, the editor of the Literary Digest and many others. Always the great preponderance of the replies is in favor.

MRS. HOWE STATES BENEFITS

"The fundamental argument for woman suffrage, of course, is its justice; and this would be enough, were there no other. But a powerful argument can also be made for it from the standpoint of expediency.

Judges of the Tribunals of Commerce. In Belgium, women were given a vote for the Conseils des Prudhommes.

In the years from 1910 to 1915 inclusive, women were given full suffrage in California, Washington, Kansas, Oregon, Arizona, Montana, Nevada, Alaska, Iceland, Denmark and Bosnia*; municipal suffrage and the right to vote for President of the United States in Illinois; municipal suffrage in South Africa, in Laibach (Austria), Baroda (India), and Belize (Honduras); and school suffrage in New Mexico. Women taxpayers were given a vote upon bonding propositions in all the third-class cities of New York State. IndividIndividual cities in several different States gave women a vote upon local questions; and the Kingdom of Wurtemberg gave women engaged in agriculture a vote for members of the Chamber of Agriculture.

Years ago, when equal suffrage was much less popular than it is now, somebody asked Bishop Gilbert Haven if it were true that he had been speaking at a suffrage meeting. "Yes," answered the Bishop. "I do not want to fall in at the rear of this reform; I prefer to march with the procession!"

There can be no doubt as to which way the procession is moving.

NEIGHBORS ADOPT IT

"The proof of the pudding is in the eating." The best evidence that equal suffrage has been found satisfactory is that it spreads steadily from state to state. With the exception of Illinois, the enfranchised States lie in a solid block, all bordering upon one another, and now occupying almost the whole western half of the United States. If equal suffrage had caused general unhappiness in the first state which tried it-if it had led to one tenth part of the horrible consequences which

*Full suffrage is used in this article as meaning the right to vote for the highest elective offices. In Bosnia and some other places there is a property qualification

are predicted from it-the people right across the border could not have failed to know it, and they would not have followed the example.

CALIFORNIA DEFEATS REPEAL

Another proof that it works well is that it is not repealed anywhere. The late Justice Brewer of the U. S. Supreme Court said this showed decisively that the majority of the people were satisfied with it. An unsuccessful attempt was made to repeal it in California in 1912, under the initiative and referendum. One of the printed circulars sent out by the California anti-suffragists at that time can be seen at Massachusetts Suffrage Headquarters, 585 Boylston St., Boston. It appeals for help in circulating the initiative petition to have the question resubmitted. It says, in part: "Only 32,000 signatures are necessary. The expenses so far for printing, obtaining signatures, etc., amount to more than $1500. Send us $100, $50, $5 or $1. A majority of the men and a majority of the women are opposed to woman suffrage. If this be true, it will surely be repealed. Get in and help."

Both men and women were eligible to sign. There were about 1,500,000 men and women of voting age in California; yet the antis failed to get the 32,000 signatures needed to resubmit the question.

ADVERSE TESTIMONY SCARCE For twenty years, an active AntiSuffrage Association in Massachusetts has been gathering all the adverse testimony that it could get. In all the enfranchised states put together it has not yet found a dozen respectable men who say over their own names and addresses that suffrage has had any bad results.* FAVORABLE TESTIMONY OVERWHELMING

The personal testimonies to its good results would fill many pages.

*Unless some new testimony has come n during the last few weeks

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