Decision Support Systems: Concepts and Resources for Managers

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 2002 - 251 pages
1 Review

For MIS specialists and nonspecialists alike, teacher and consultant Dan Power provides a readable, comprehensive, understandable guide to the concepts and applications of decision support systems. Not only does his book help enhance your DSS design and development capabilities, it also shows how DSS can buttress organization goals and the impact DSS have throughout organizations and at all levels of management. Power defines DSS broadly: interactive computer-based systems and subsystems that help people use computer communications, data, documents, knowledge, and models to solve problems and make decisions. He focuses his book on practical applications, but also includes important and relevant empirical research and underlying theory. His book thus provides enough concrete detail to help grasp the essentials of DSS, but it also gives advanced tips and suggestions to DSS specialists too. For people trained in fields outside the information sciences, Power's book is especially valuable. It gives them the knowledge they need to work with their MIS colleagues and to truly appreciate the management value of information technology overall.

Power makes clear that decision support systems differ and that managers must specify what they want, based on their needs and the purposes to which the systems will be put. They should know how to build DSS and understand the basics of networking, security, and web-based DSS. Thus, of special interest is the structure that Power uses to organize his book. In Chapter 1 he presents an expanded framework for categorizing DSS. Chapters 2-5 provide a general managerial and technical perspective on building DSS. In Chapters 7 through 11 he lays out the details and gives examples of the general types of DSS. The last chapter, Evaluating Decision Support System Projects, reviews and discusses the tools and issues associated with assessing proposals for DSS projects. The book also includes a glossary and DSS audit questions, giving it special, ongoing value to all readers.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

nice

Contents

IV
1
V
2
VI
5
VII
8
VIII
9
IX
12
X
16
XI
19
LV
115
LVI
116
LVII
120
LIX
123
LX
124
LXI
125
LXII
130
LXIII
133

XII
21
XIII
22
XIV
23
XV
26
XVI
27
XVIII
30
XIX
32
XX
34
XXI
35
XXII
37
XXIII
41
XXIV
43
XXV
48
XXVI
50
XXVII
52
XXVIII
55
XXIX
57
XXX
59
XXXI
61
XXXII
65
XXXIII
67
XXXIV
69
XXXV
71
XXXVI
72
XXXVII
73
XXXVIII
75
XXXIX
77
XL
79
XLI
81
XLII
82
XLIII
84
XLIV
87
XLV
88
XLVI
94
XLVII
97
XLVIII
102
XLIX
103
L
104
LI
105
LII
107
LIII
111
LIV
112
LXIV
134
LXV
137
LXVI
138
LXVII
141
LXVIII
142
LXIX
144
LXX
145
LXXI
147
LXXII
149
LXXIII
153
LXXIV
154
LXXVI
157
LXXVII
158
LXXVIII
161
LXXIX
165
LXXX
167
LXXXI
169
LXXXII
171
LXXXIII
173
LXXXIV
176
LXXXVI
179
LXXXVII
180
LXXXVIII
181
LXXXIX
184
XC
186
XCI
188
XCII
189
XCIII
191
XCIV
192
XCV
195
XCVI
196
XCVII
198
XCVIII
204
XCIX
205
C
207
CI
208
CII
211
CIII
217
CIV
221
CV
237
CVI
247
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2002)

DANIEL J. POWER is Professor of Information Systems and Management at the College of Business Administration, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls. He holds a doctorate in Business Administration from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has developed decision support software and systems, and has examined the impacts of DSS on managers in his research studies. Power has published numerous book chapters and proceedings papers and has authored more than 20 articles for the important journals of his field. He also serves as Editor of DSSResources.com, the knowledge repository about computerized systems that support decision making.

Bibliographic information